Jump to content
Yoda

2014-15 Off-season Thread

Recommended Posts

If typing is the preferred form of written communication, why aren't you guys petitioning your congressman to have the schools adopt the Dvorak keyboard rather than Qwerty? Dvorak is faster, results in fewer errors, and has less repetitive finger strain injuries. And most operating systems already allow people to switch over to Dvorak upon plugging in the new keyboard.

We should switch to the metric system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BetMGM Michigan $600 Risk-Free bet

BetMGM Michigan Sports Betting
Michigan online sports betting is now available! Start betting at BetMGM Michigan now and get a $600 risk-free bet bonus at their online sportsbook & casino.

Claim $600 risk-free bet at BetMGM Michigan Now

They can.

I'm still curious to see exactly what this packed elementary school curriculum consists of that there just isn't enough time to teach how to write in cursive.

I'm sure someone from the political forum can pop in with some anecdote about their niece being elementary teacher and the packed lesson plans that just don't allow for learning how to string together cursive letters.

I'm not saying they can't teach it. I'm saying it's not very important anymore and I'm not upset that a lot of schools don't teach it. If they can fit in, then fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reading?

Cursive sucks. I hated it. It's not even faster.

I hated it too and I'm glad it's not being used much anymore. If some people like it as an art form, then good for them. The only time we need it to sign our name and I can't even read most signatures anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We should switch to the metric system.

I think we should. I'm not going to campaign for it but it makes more sense than what we have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They can.

I'm still curious to see exactly what this packed elementary school curriculum consists of that there just isn't enough time to teach how to write in cursive.

I'm sure someone from the political forum can pop in with some anecdote about their niece being elementary teacher and the packed lesson plans that just don't allow for learning how to string together cursive letters.

I don't teach elementary kids, but I do teach older kids. Here's what teachers are running up against lately. This is third grade, but after a brief look through the literature, informational text, foundational skills, reading & listening, and writing strands of the state standards, it's quite a bit. Keep in mind that there are similarly stringent standards in math, and while science and history aren't quite to this level yet, they will be soon. Also keep in mind that kids need music, art, gym, computer class, recess, and lunch. And we have a whole 180 days to do this in, and most of it takes a ton of repetition to get toward anything resembling mastery for most students. Also consider that you're likely in the top 25% of parents as far as helping along your child's education.

English Language Arts Standards » Reading: Literature » Grade 3 | Common Core State Standards Initiative

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's always time, but these are kids we're talking about. Most of the point of school is to babysit.

I'm sure you learned algebra, geometry, the carbon cycle, inferential reading, and the founding of America on your own, or from your parents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They can. And if they aren't getting this in the public schools, they should. However, as schools generally are already teaching children to read and write (at public schools this may be debatable), it makes a lot of sense for them to also teach cursive since this is just the next iteration of hand writing.

Most home school programs teach cursive.

Public schools are good. At least the one I went to. You get what you put into them and luckily I learned from my parents to put a lot into it. I remember when I was teaching statistics classes and I had a lot of students from private schools who didn't seem better prepared than those who went to public schools. It depends on both the school and the individual.

Edited by tiger337

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just creating a stable environment and generally supporting one's children positively without being a pushover or overbearing probably puts a parent in the top half of parents in terms of setting up a child to succeed educationally with no other contribution.

Edited by Mr. Bigglesworth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Public schools are good. At least the one I went to. You get what you put into them and luckily I learned from my parents to put a lot into it. I remember when I was teaching statistics classes and I had a lot of students from private schools who didn't seem better prepared than those who went to public schools. It depends on both the school and the individual.

I am an engineer and I was really fortunate because I had excellent math teachers in high school (all 4 years) and the physics teacher was pretty solid as well. The chemistry teacher was retiring and checked out emotionally. History was ok. English was ok.

I personally doubt too many students, private school or otherwise, received as good a mathematics education as I had entering college. I lucked out in that regard, given my interest in the subject and future major / career choice.

Mr. Boudreau, Mr. Henningfeld and Mr. Peters, you knocked it out of the park. Good job.

Edited by Mr. Bigglesworth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just creating a stable environment and supporting one's children positively without being a pushover or overbearing probably puts a parent in the top half of parents by itself.

I'm working two jobs now: substitute teaching and at a group home for 16-17 year old kids. Sometimes I sub AP seniors from 7:30am-3:00pm, then go right to the other job from 3:15pm until midnight. It's some pretty stark difference in the apparent level of parents having given a crap about their kids. I had a chat with this awesome junior one time whose parents had just taken him on a tour of the best colleges in California, then went and picked up one of my charges at the group home from school and had a chat about how she was raped by her father.

I was bummed all last summer because I couldn't find a conveniently-located full-time teaching gig, but I'm so glad I ended up where I am this year, because it's providing me with very valuable perspective on the variety of kids that I'll be responsible for teaching when I eventually land a full-time gig.

So if you think public school is just babysitting, and you're also a non-negligent parent, do teachers and the other students a favor and get your kid out of there. It's way easier to teach in a classroom full of fewer and collective less cynical people. And apparently you can do the job better on your own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is half- frightening / half-disheartening to me to see how some parents are to their kid regarding youth athletics.

The least negative thing I can say is some of these kids would be much better off if there parent weren't around. Athletically, emotionally, mentally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend of mine works in a group home and he has some great stories. And by great I mean in the literal sense, not in the "that's friggin' awesome dude" sense. But it was also sad at times. One guy was the victim of an accident and received a ton of money. Left him with the mind of a 7 year old but his family made out like bandits. They send this guy to live at this home so they don't have to bother with him except for every other weekend. He said they have a 5000 sq foot gated house. He sits and watches Nickelodean all day in the group home. My buddy said he leads a Walking Dead discussion with the guys in the home who can watch it. He loves the job and is fortunate to be in a good one that pays well. He takes it seriously... he's not just there to babysit. he wants to help them.

My youngest son will never be independent and right now we say we're not sending him to live in one but who knows, he may reach a point where he wants to and there may be one worthy of him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eno Sarris, predicting some breakout sluggers for 2015, on Castellanos

Castellanos peaked as Baseball America's 21st-best prospect after the 2012 season, and that's good for second-best in this group. Scouts have always loved his hit tool, although that is something that has shown better in his batting average on balls in play in the minors than in his contact rates. Last season, Castellanos followed suit with below-average contact rates but good outcomes when he did make contact. The .326 BABIP was above average, and the .135 ISO was right on average. But despite weighted offense that was below league average, pitchers were more careful with him in the second half. Steamer likes the 22-year-old for a modest increase in power output (.144 projected ISO), but should we like his sweet swing more?

Breakout sluggers, predicted by fastballs | FOX Sports

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am an engineer and I was really fortunate because I had excellent math teachers in high school (all 4 years) and the physics teacher was pretty solid as well. The chemistry teacher was retiring and checked out emotionally. History was ok. English was ok.

I personally doubt too many students, private school or otherwise, received as good a mathematics education as I had entering college. I lucked out in that regard, given my interest in the subject and future major / career choice.

Mr. Boudreau, Mr. Henningfeld and Mr. Peters, you knocked it out of the park. Good job.

I had a mix of good and bad teachers in high school. The good ones tended to be in Math and English, so I was well prepared in those areas. I didn't get as much out of other subjects such as history and political science. My school was actually one of the best in the state for math. All schools have strengths and weaknesses I suppose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Eno Sarris, predicting some breakout sluggers for 2015, on Castellanos

Breakout sluggers, predicted by fastballs | FOX Sports

Interesting article. It does make sense that young hitters who don't see a lot of fastballs would be looked upon favorably. Pitchers don't want to waste non-fastballs on young hitters who can be retired with fastballs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I say kids are babysit, as a couple posters alluded to, I'm talking about the age when cursive is taught. Like kindergarten and 1st grade, where there's literally nap time and recess time. Not later on when you're moving from class to class.

I guess I shouldn't talk, school was all about sitting in an uncomfortable desk for 6 hours a day 180 days a year 12 years out of my life. Most of that spent being bored by stuff said on the 2nd-nth days that I learned on the 1st day.

The best thing about college was being able to skip class if I didn't need it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When I say kids are babysit, as a couple posters alluded to, I'm talking about the age when cursive is taught. Like kindergarten and 1st grade, where there's literally nap time and recess time. Not later on when you're moving from class to class.

.

If I remember correctly, I was not taught cursive until third and fourth grade. In kindergarten, we did a lot of counting, alphabet reciting and coloring. No nap time though! We were always doing something.

I didn't share your learning experience. Learning was always hard work for me. I got frustrated more often than bored.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If I remember correctly, I was not taught cursive until third and fourth grade. In kindergarten, we did a lot of counting, alphabet reciting and coloring. No nap time though! We were always doing something.

I didn't share your learning experience. Learning was always hard work for me. I got frustrated more often than bored.

I don't remember doing cursive till 3rd grade. I also don't remember naps in kindergarten. I also think recess is important because kids can learn social skills and need time to release energy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't teach elementary kids, but I do teach older kids. Here's what teachers are running up against lately. This is third grade, but after a brief look through the literature, informational text, foundational skills, reading & listening, and writing strands of the state standards, it's quite a bit. Keep in mind that there are similarly stringent standards in math, and while science and history aren't quite to this level yet, they will be soon. Also keep in mind that kids need music, art, gym, computer class, recess, and lunch. And we have a whole 180 days to do this in, and most of it takes a ton of repetition to get toward anything resembling mastery for most students. Also consider that you're likely in the top 25% of parents as far as helping along your child's education.

English Language Arts Standards » Reading: Literature » Grade 3 | Common Core State Standards Initiative

Yes, thank you. This is what I was looking for, though I can't really decipher that webpage.

I may be underestimating the amount of time that would need to be spent each day to teach how to write and read cursive. Like you said, these things require repetition.

I'm just having a hard time buying that there isn't enough space in a curriculum for third graders to include cursive, or that eliminating it would create a tangible surplus where a third grader could be taught something more than they were already being taught.

Learning the actual letters seems like it would take a modicum of effort and time. The actual writing of the letters and words would take a lot of practice, but these kids have to write quite a bit, so folding that into other exercises seems like an easy solution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If I remember correctly, I was not taught cursive until third and fourth grade. In kindergarten, we did a lot of counting, alphabet reciting and coloring. No nap time though! We were always doing something.

I didn't share your learning experience. Learning was always hard work for me. I got frustrated more often than bored.

Maybe it was later for us too, I don't remember. It probably was, I'm now remembering for a couple years we had to write all papers in cursive. This is probably when I first started to despise writing.

One awesome thing some school(s)? are doing around here is teaching a foreign language from elementary up through middle school or whatever, when people most easily learn that. Kids are ending up being fluent and doing homework for HS kids many years older than them. I would have killed for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Michigan Sports Betting Offer

Michigan launched online sports betting and casino apps on Friday, January 22, 2021. We have selected the top Michigan sportsbooks and casinos that offer excellent bonus offers. Terms and conditions apply.

BetRivers Michigan - Get a 100% up to $250 deposit bonus at their online sportsbook & casino.

Click Here to claim $250 deposit bonus at BetRivers Michigan For Signing Up Now

FanDuel Michigan - Get a $1,000 risk-free bet at FanDuel Michigan on your first bet.

Click Here to claim $1,000 Risk-Free Bet at FanDuel Michigan

BetMGM Michigan - Get a $600 risk-free bet at the BetMGM online casino & sportsbook

Click Here to claim $600 risk-free bet at BetMGM Michigan

   


×
×
  • Create New...