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Yoda

2014-15 Off-season Thread

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Side note pet peeve- I'm noticing so many more typos and misspellings in online articles from very prominent newspapers and writers. Just awful.

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Not to get Casimir all upset with this comparison

There was no baseball yesterday. There is no baseball today. There will not be baseball tomorrow. This is upsetting enough.

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Side note pet peeve- I'm noticing so many more typos and misspellings in online articles from very prominent newspapers and writers. Just awful.

Yup. I see it in more professional emails lately too. I'd chalk up 99% of it to people moving from PC/Laptops to tablets and overly relying on autocorrect.

That article did a pretty good job of getting me excited for the season. It's a bummer in the short term that we didn't get Scherzer, but if (and this is a big if) the Tigers can be healthier in 2015 than they were last year I wouldn't be surprised if they turn out better than they were last season. I think they'll be more fun to watch at least.

Can the season hurry up and start? I'm growing impatient.

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I hate to go into a season depending on so many injury recoveries, but there it is. The guys who are recovering will be better than any other options if they recover, so you really have no choice but to ride it out hoping they do.

If they don't you are screwed, but then, you can always get screwed by new injuries anyway, so what's the diff?

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I wonder if spelling is progressively getting worse with each generation because it is stressed less / deemed less important paired with spell check on computers, starting with my generation (I am 40).

I wonder that, in no small part, because I remember I was tasked with a director to review an intern's senior project paper about 10 years ago. He was 50 then, I was 30. He thought her spelling was abhorrent. I thought is was bad, though not embarrassingly so.

We talked about it during or review, and he was saying how when he was in school they really stressed spelling and the basic assumption was if you couldn't spell well you were thought of as a dummy. Spelling was stressed, but it wasn't that big a deal when I went to school. The intern admitted that they spent relatively little time on spelling when she was in school, which I didn't forget. Now that I have kids (5th and 7th grade), I see that seems to be true.

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I wonder if spelling is progressively getting worse with each generation because it is stressed less / deemed less important paired with spell check on computers, starting with my generation (I am 40).

I wonder that, in no small part, because I remember I was tasked with a director to review an intern's senior project paper about 10 years ago. He was 50 then, I was 30. He thought her spelling was abhorrent. I thought is was bad, though not embarrassingly so.

We talked about it during or review, and he was saying how when he was in school they really stressed spelling and the basic assumption was if you couldn't spell well you were thought of as a dummy. Spelling was stressed, but it wasn't that big a deal when I went to school. The intern admitted that they spent relatively little time on spelling when she was in school, which I didn't forget. Now that I have kids (5th and 7th grade), I see that seems to be true.

The thing with spelling and penmanship for me is, when I write something I want to be understood. I don't want people so distracted trying to decipher poor handwriting and misspelled words that they aren't absorbing what I'm trying to convey. It was a lesson that I unfortunately didn't learn until half way through college, but I'm glad it finally sunk in.

I think it makes a difference in working with others.

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The thing with spelling and penmanship for me is, when I write something I want to be understood. I don't want people so distracted trying to decipher poor handwriting and misspelled words that they aren't absorbing what I'm trying to convey. It was a lesson that I unfortunately didn't learn until half way through college, but I'm glad it finally sunk in.

I think it makes a difference in working with others.

I don't disagree - I just think the focus at schools have changed.

Another example:

My sons sign their names. They are 12 and 10. Many, if not most of their classmates don't sign their name because they don't know cursive, because cursive isn't being taught much now.

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I don't disagree - I just think the focus at schools have changed.

Another example:

My sons sign their names. They are 12 and 10. Many, if not most of their classmates don't sign their name because they don't know cursive, because cursive isn't being taught much now.

I think I read somewhere that most states have removed cursive from their curriculum. I personally don't see much use for it any more.

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I was a good speller in school, but terrible at cursive. One day, we had a spelling test which had to be done in cursive. I knew how to spell every word, but the teacher could not understand my writing and decided that there were 16 misspellings. She made me write every misspelled word 25 times. So, I did that in the same crappy hand writing I used on the test. I'm not sure what lesson was learned there.

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I was a good speller in school, but terrible at cursive. One day, we had a spelling test which had to be done in cursive. I knew how to spell every word, but the teacher could not understand my writing and decided that there were 16 misspellings. She made me write every misspelled word 25 times. So, I did that in the same crappy hand writing I used on the test. I'm not sure what lesson was learned there.

You learned how to deal with a world that isn't fair and for the most part, dumber than you are. Hooray real life!

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I think I read somewhere that most states have removed cursive from their curriculum. I personally don't see much use for it any more.

Wow. I had no clue it was being phased out. It's a much faster way to write but people use handwriting a lot less these days.

For some reason, I've always written in all caps. Not the same height - capitals are taller and regular letters are shorter - but for some reason when I was a kid I thought it looked cool and it just stuck. Now, with the internet, all caps means you're yelling, so it always looks like I'm yelling when I write something. I'm kind of annoyed by it but it's not worth it to change at this point. I rarely ever write things by hand.

all-caps-hand-writing.jpg

Edited by Yoda

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I write in a combination of cursive and non cursive.... really just a matter of speed. The only time I write things down is to take notes in a meeting or from a phone call and the notes from a meeting are usually written on the agenda or notice. I do have a notebook I use as well. But it's for my own consumption.

Given the limited amount of time now in schools I'd say cursive is not needed.

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I can't imagine what other types of things you could possibly teach first and second graders that would require bumping cursive from the agenda.

People need to understand how to read cursive, so you have to teach it. You also need to know how sign your name, which you can't do without teaching it.

I honestly don't know when it is taught, but what other things are there to teach kids. Reading comes practice. You can only absorb so much math and science. I suppose grammar is important, but writing and penmanship can be rolled into that.

I don't know. I just don't feel like we were being taught cursive so we could better write letters and other documents by hand. Typewriters have been around for awhile too.

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I can't remember the last time I had to read something written in cursive. I also haven't wrote in cursive since about 4th grade. I think it would be more advantageous to teach keyboarding to kids. I went through school just before everything went digital. When I was in elementary school nothing was done on computer in terms of word processing. By high school, typing classes were an elective. I was behind the curve and learned cursive that I never use.

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My son is 14 and has been in public schools in Dearborn. He was not taught cursive. He knows how to write his name and an read it if he has to but they don't enforce it to the degree that your "G" has to look perfect. They could teach them how to read an analog clock because I know lots of kids who cannot. Writing in cursive was needed because writing was how we communicated and it was pretty and probably a remnant of the ink in a jar days where you needed to keep the thing on the paper as much as possible. It's archaic. It's no different than an abicus at this point. The only people I see who write in cursive are women when they give each other birthday cards.

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Wow. I had no clue it was being phased out. It's a much faster way to write but people use handwriting a lot less these days.

For some reason, I've always written in all caps. Not the same height - capitals are taller and regular letters are shorter - but for some reason when I was a kid I thought it looked cool and it just stuck. Now, with the internet, all caps means you're yelling, so it always looks like I'm yelling when I write something. I'm kind of annoyed by it but it's not worth it to change at this point. I rarely ever write things by hand.

all-caps-hand-writing.jpg

Um, you know that you're printing and not writing, right? Just making sure.

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Cursive is an old solution for an old problem. Everyone types now. I see no reason to teach kids how to write in cursive. I didn't write in cursive from about 1997 to 2009, when I had to copy a paragraph in cursive for GRE registration. That was the most stressful part of the test.

There is all kinds of stuff I'd rather have my future incoming English students know than cursive. How about organizing ideas into a coherent argument? How about eliminating weasel words? Logical thinking? Unlearning English misconceptions, such as 'don't use "I" or "you" in formal writing,' or 'don't end your sentences with a preposition,' or 'don't split infinitives,' or 'don't use contractions in formal writing'? I could go on. Cursive is basically useless in the 21st century.

As far as handwriting goes: I saw some pretty bad handwriting from the 7th and 8th graders while student teaching, but the fact is that 98% of the important writing that anyone of their generation will do will be typed. It's way more important to teach clear thinking, which is evidenced by clear writing, than satisfying people over the age of 50 who say 'back in my day, we had to learn cursive!'

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Typing is absolutely a worthy replacement. Nobody needs and will barely ever use cursive. You don't need it to sign your name either. A signature doesn't even have to be your full name. Or your name at all, for that matter.

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