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8 or 9 Ohio State players to suspended from Sugar Bowl?


stevie-y
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Past year? Try past generation. I can't think of any other institution associated with American education that is more misguided in its basic understanding of its useful role than the NCAA. I'm hard pressed to think of any organization I'd more like to see just go away.

It's not entirely their fault, they have an impossible mission statement. The entire idea of "college amateur athletics" is belied by the reality of the billion dollar business that is college basketball and football.

So every time they police the rules -which I think are ridiculous - they are going to get slammed as hypocrites because there is so much going on outside the rules that everyone knows about, but can never prove.

I'm not defending them, I'm saying the fascination with "amateurism" is ridiculous. These guys are professionals. they just happen to be in the minor league system of college rather than in academies and reserve squads like they are in every other country in the world.

Just pay them a salary..I mean stipend..and be done with it.

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I'm an OSU alum and I'm furious OSU players would sell their Big Ten Championship rings and Pryor his "Gold Pants". These are accomplishments people should cherish for the rest of their lives. However, I didn't realize there were such harsh penalties for selling your personal property. I think it is very weird that someone cannot sell their possession, if they so choose.

The tattoo situation is completely on the players. I'm extremely confident they should have known better on this account.

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I'm an OSU alum and I'm furious OSU players would sell their Big Ten Championship rings and Pryor his "Gold Pants". These are accomplishments people should cherish for the rest of their lives. However, I didn't realize there were such harsh penalties for selling your personal property. I think it is very weird that someone cannot sell their possession, if they so choose.

The tattoo situation is completely on the players. I'm extremely confident they should have known better on this account.

Pryor is young and dumb. A deadly combination.

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Why the he'll can't you sell YOUR big ten championship ring?
I'm an OSU alum and I'm furious OSU players would sell their Big Ten Championship rings and Pryor his "Gold Pants". These are accomplishments people should cherish for the rest of their lives. However, I didn't realize there were such harsh penalties for selling your personal property. I think it is very weird that someone cannot sell their possession, if they so choose.

These are gifts they were given as a result of playing for the university. If there were no rules against selling these items then nothing would prevent a wealthy booster from giving a large cash payout to a player under the guise of purchasing memorabilia.

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These are gifts they were given as a result of playing for the university. If there were no rules against selling these items then nothing would prevent a wealthy booster from giving a large cash payout to a player under the guise of purchasing memorabilia.

True and good point. I'm sure there are OSU boosters who would pay much more for a pair of gold pants if it were common practice. It appears they all received fair market value for the items. If they had received 10K then it would be excessive. I understand the rule, but I think it is a little odd. I'm more disgusted these guys would sell their pieces of history.

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These are gifts they were given as a result of playing for the university. If there were no rules against selling these items then nothing would prevent a wealthy booster from giving a large cash payout to a player under the guise of purchasing memorabilia.

I guess I don't understand why it is that much easier to sell something received as a result for playing for the university to a wealthy booster as opposed to something else, like a car or other personal property.

I mean, if the premise is the only, or primary, reason the individual paid top dollar for an item was to put $$$ in the pocket of the student athlete, they could accomplish that just as easily by 'buying' other crap.

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I guess I don't understand why it is that much easier to sell something received as a result for playing for the university to a wealthy booster as opposed to something else, like a car or other personal property.

I mean, if the premise is the only, or primary, reason the individual paid top dollar for an item was to put $$$ in the pocket of the student athlete, they could accomplish that just as easily by 'buying' other crap.

i dont think your suppose to sell anything......this just proves my point that the fans probably value these awards alot more then the athletes.

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i dont think your suppose to sell anything......this just proves my point that the fans probably value these awards alot more then the athletes.

I don't know the rules at all.

I just was questioning the commentary that read, "These are gifts they were given as a result of playing for the university. If there were no rules against selling these items then nothing would prevent a wealthy booster from giving a large cash payout to a player under the guise of purchasing memorabilia", which suggests the issue was with selling something given as a result of playing for the university, as opposed to selling an valuable item in general.

Edited by Mr. Bigglesworth
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I guess I don't understand why it is that much easier to sell something received as a result for playing for the university to a wealthy booster as opposed to something else, like a car or other personal property.

I mean, if the premise is the only, or primary, reason the individual paid top dollar for an item was to put $$$ in the pocket of the student athlete, they could accomplish that just as easily by 'buying' other crap.

A car owned by a player is much harder to disguise as a payoff and sell.

It has an established value and title that must be registered with the state. They also almost always deteriorate in value with time. A championship ring doesn't have any paper trail and ownership doesn't have to be declared to any public or private entity. The value of a piece of memorabilia is often speculative and can increase with the future success of a player and thus the price paid by one individual over the next could vary widely.

I also believe it is against the rules for a player to sell a car or something else of value to someone with booster status.

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A car owned by a player is much harder to disguise as a payoff and sell.

It has an established value and title that must be registered with the state. They also almost always deteriorate in value with time. A championship ring doesn't have any paper trail and ownership doesn't have to be declared to any public or private entity.

Even if a car is out, other personal property (or a family member's personal property) could be sold instead that doesn't have a title / paper trial.

I also believe it is against the rules for a player to sell a car or something else of value to someone with booster status.

Which, if true, means it is irrelevant whether the sold item was received as a result for playing for the university when the item in question was sold for a large sum of money / or other significant consideration. Which was my original point.

Edited by Mr. Bigglesworth
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