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STLTiger69

MotownSports Fan
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Everything posted by STLTiger69

  1. I really think the Tigers should just take it easy on the trade market right now and ride out 2017 to see what they have and let some bothersome things take care of themselves. The Tigers lost the division by 8 games in 2016. Pelfrey and Sanchez had 48 starts in 2016. The Tigers will not repeat that same mistake again in 2017. In 48 starts, Pelfrey and Sanchez managed to win a combined 11 games. in 46 starts, Boyd and Fulmer won 17 games. Sprinkle in Norris and a health Zimmerman to take those 48 starts from Pelfrey and Sanchez, and I think that makes the Tigers a couple more wins smarter for 2017 alone. I also really think Zimmerman will be a pretty decent pitcher for the Tigers in 2017. I think any pitcher can have a lousy year, especially if injuries are involved and turn the calendar to 2017 with a healthy Zimmerman and we will see how far a Zimmerman can help the Tigers going forward. Justin Upton has an opt out option after the 2017 season. If the Tigers trade JD Martinez this off season and Upton leaves after the 2017 season, how comfortable as a fan are you about the Tigers 2018+ chances going forward? I think another course of action would be to give both Upton and JD Martinez until just before the trade deadline in the 2017 season to see what is going on both with their careers and the Tigers organizational direction. A hot Upton or a solid JD Martinez are exactly to kind of bat you want for a playoff run. IF the Tigers are in the playoff hunt for 2017- fantastic, you got two good bats to help. If the Tigers are not in the playoff hunt near the trade deadline, dump Upton first if you can or then JD if you can't dump Upton. But let the player you trade know that that Tigers could also be one of the teams that could put in a free agent bid for them too.....wink...wink...to get them back for 2018.... Just my 2 cents anyway...
  2. I'm just not getting the "trade Iglesias" vibe in me right now. I'm not sure the Tigers could trade Iglesias away for something of similar or better value than they could simply go get in the free agent market this off season anyway. I do hope Machado turns out to be a good player, but I don't want Machado to be Sizemore 2.0 starting at shortstop for 2016 and reading stories by sportswriters all this year and the next year that Machado is only a year or two from really being a good major league player. Keep Iglesias, buy an outfielder (Or even...jeez, call Torii Hunter, tell him full time RF and move JD Martinez to LF,....done...lol....moving on) and work on another starter or two and the bullpen. That's all.....
  3. I'd take this with a grain of salt. Some baseball agents like to try and put their players name with a big spending team to try and get a larger contract with another team. I think the result is a headache for the GM who announces his team has money to spend as every sports writer and other GM will want to know if (and to what degree) that big spending GM is on every free agent. Scott Boras specifically likes to say,..."Gee, the Tigers, Red Sox and Dodgers all want my player, so you better come up with a much better offer than that to get my client" So to me, a smart GM will simply hide their money under the table until they know it's needed rather than being known as the team that was willing to give a great starting offer for a player that other teams need to beat. PS: I still do think Papa Illitch will write a big check for the right player and for the right deal even after spending to improve the team. It's just the Tigers will pick that player to pursue and not the player's agent trying to tie the Tigers to a large contract number to help themselves....
  4. I'll take a swipe at an answer. First, if you think about it, a LOT of games feature run scoring opportunities for the other team in the 7th or 8th inning, and even more games feature the better part of the oppositions lineup due up in the 7th or 8th inning too. So if your going to use your shut down closer in those circumstances, you'd probably be using them a lot. And speaking of using them a lot, many closers already pitch in as many as 60-70+ games. Mark Melancon in 2015 pitched in 78 games and Jeurys Familia 76 games. So I'm pretty sure that using your closer against theoretical better part of the oppositions lineup would just add to the innings and appearances. Secondly, the "we can still win this" If your middle relief gives up the lead- and then if your team does not come back, you can rest your closer for that game and use him tomorrow. Where if you burn your closer in the 7th inning and your middle reliever loses the game in the 9th, you've used your best and 2nd best, and you still have a game to try and win tomorrow too. Third, Strategery. If your the Red Sox and your one run behind and you've decided to give David Ortiz the day off, with the understanding that his bat would be available for a pinch hitting duty, when would you use him? Against the closer in the 7th or 8th inning or against the set up guy in the 9th? My hunch is teams would be pretty thrilled to hold back pinch hitters until the 9th to face your second best reliever than feel obligated to sub out in the 7th or 8th inning against your best. Fourth: Who saves the savior? What happens when your closer gets in trouble in the 7th or 8th? Do you summon your second best reliever to bail him out or see if your closer can get out of the 7th inning by giving up 3 runs or less? If it's a save situation, these things tend to settle themselves. If Benoit gives up a 3 run homer to lose the game in the 9th inning, then he didn't need saving, the games over. If it's the 7th inning and your closer Benoit just gave up the lead, do you go get him and put in your second best? Call out Zach Miner to finish the inning and hope things don't get worse? Lastly, in that same vein; closers often do worse in non-save situations than save situations. If it's not heart pounding, adrenaline pumping, crowd on their feet stomping and clapping, a lot of closers are simply not themselves... My 2 cents worth anyway....
  5. To me, what also really set the 1984 team apart from the 2006-2013 teams was the mustaches... I think the Tiger's organizationally should consider more strongly the impact mustaches make when they are drafting players too,....(lol)
  6. Avila clearly means the Tigers are going to spend closer to $378-400 million instead...
  7. There are some questions that science just does not need to ever answer....
  8. Did MLB run out of other relievers the Tigers could trade/sign instead?
  9. It's nothing that a better defense, more productive offense and stronger pitching couldn't fix...
  10. I had my Gene Lamont jersey all cleaned and pressed and ready to wear,......and now I feel so betrayed!
  11. For what it's worth, a bit more perspective. I agree, throwing a 100 mph fastball followed by a 91 mph fastball would be a great way to mess with a hitters timing, but that's not what Rondon did in the two separate appearances, one being a save situation and one non-save situation. Rondon's save situation showed a fastball that varied only between 97 and 100 mph. 4 pitches at 100 mph 5 pitches at 99 mph 7 pitches at 98 mph 1 fastball at 97 mph So the majority of Rondon's pitchers were between 98 and 99 mph in the save situation (PS, his slider was clocked at 87, 89 and 90 mph) Rondon's non save fastball varied between 96 to 91 mph and featured: 1 pitch at 96 mph (to get the last out of the inning) 1 pitch at 94 mph 4 pitchers at 93 mph 4 pitches at 92 mph 1 pitch 91 mph And in the non-save situation, Rondon's majority of pitches were between 93 and 92 mph.... (PS: His change up was clocked at 90 mph and his slider was clocked at 80 mph and 82 mph). So there was no 100 mph to 91 mph. It was a high of 96 mph and a low of 91 mph in the non save situation for his fastball. In the save situation, Rondon didn't throw a single fastball below 97 mph.
  12. Here's more of what I found. Rondon's last save appearance against the Twins on September 15th. Check out his pitches: Danny Santana (all fastballs are 4 seam) 1st pitch 100 mph fastball (ball) 2nd pitch 98 mph fastball (called strike) 3rd pitch 99 mph fastball (called strike) 4th pitch 100 mph fastball (foul) 5th pitch 99 mph fastball (ball) 6th pitch 99 mph fastball (ground out to pitcher) Aaron Hicks: 1st pitch 98 mph fastball (ball) 2nd pitch 98 mph fastball (called strike) 3rd pitch 98 mph fastball (foul) 4th pitch 97 mph fastball (popup, SS out) Brian Dozier 1st pitch 100 mph fastball (ball) 2nd pitch 99 mph fastball (ball) 3rd pitch 98 mph fastball (ball) 4th pitch 98 mph fastball (called strike) 5th pitch 99 mph fastball (ball- walk) Joe Mauer Catchers indifference, Brain Dozier to second base 1st pitch 98 mph fastball (strike) 2nd pitch 100 mph fastball (Mauer doubles, Dozier scores) (After a coaching visit) Miguel Sano batting: 1st pitch 87 mph slider (called strike) 2nd pitch 89 mph slider (swinging strike) 3rd pitch 90 mph slider (swinging strike- Sano strikes out). Hmmmmm....... PS: Tip of the hat to Shelton to giving a good tip where to start on this!!!!
  13. Thanks, I did a little checking, On Monday night the Tigers put Rondon in the 9th inning in a non-save situation when the Tigers were losing 3-2 (After replacing Wilson who had pitched in the 8th). Rondon did retire the side, but here is what he did: Mike Ott: 1st pitch 90 mph changeup (ball) 2nd pitch 91 mph 4 seam fastball (ball) 3rd pitch 93 mph 4 seam fastball (called strike) 4th pitch 92 mph 4 seam fastball (ground out to 3rd) Gordon Beckham 1st pitch 80 mph slider (called strike) 2nd pitch 92 mph 4 seam fastball (ball) 3rd pitch 93 mph 4 seam (Foul ball) 4th pitch 81 mph slider (ball) 5th pitch 94 mph 4 seam fastball (ball) 6th pitch 93 mph fastball (Fly's out to RF) Rob Brantly 1st pitch 93 mph 4 seam fastball (ball) 2nd pitch 92 mph 4 seam fastball (foul) 3rd pitch 92 mph 4 seam fastball (foul) 4th pitch 82 mph slider (ball) 5th pitch 96 mph fastball (grounds out to 1B) Hmmm.......
  14. I'm still sort of fuzzy on what Rondon did (or didn't do) in this....
  15. Rondon's probably too lazy to fill out the paperwork to get the player's union involved anyway...
  16. I tend to agree with you, but I could also see a contract where it would be with a 3rd "option year" with a buyout or something kooky like that. Also I think Avila has a swing custom made for Fenway Park too.... That 28 foot difference down the right field line between CoPa and Fenway might indeed be career saving for someone's son....
  17. Sorry, I though you meant Avila gave good results with that bat, not just looked "good" while making an out and crippling his team offensively. Totally my mistake then,....
  18. I'm not thinking he'll do better than 2-3 years at say $3-$5M per. But that's better than 1 year at $1M to $2M the Tigers would probably give to a back up catcher anyway. I have a feeling like Boston or possibly Texas might want to be more generous when looking for catching options than the Tigers will be...
  19. Alex and his agent agent will likely be looking for a not so cheap deal to be a starting catcher for another team with guaranteed money for several years before he would consider resigning with the Tigers for a "cheap one year deal" where it looks like Alex would be destine to playing the back up roll for one year and then bye. And Alex's "always good bat" is hitting .167 with a .632 OPS for 2015. Avila's OPS has been dropping every year: 2011 .895 2012 .736 2013 .693 2014 .686 2015 .632 If you want Avila back because he's a good defensive catcher, good at pitch framing, a good game caller, has the best beard on the team, has the coolest father/GM in the game today,...ok,...I'm in. But not because he "always has a good bat",....meh,...not so much.
  20. Also another quick thought about talent evaluation and the draft. The SF Giants are praised because they drafted Madison Bumgarner with the 10th pick of the 2007 draft. But that is partially because 9 other teams DIDN'T draft Bumganer before the Giants did. TB drafted David Price #1, KC picked Mike Moustakas #2, Cubs picked Josh Vitters #3, Pirates picked Daniel Moskos #4, Orioles Matt Wieters #5,Nationals Ross Detwiler #6 Brewers Matt LaPorta #7 , Rockies Casey Weathers #8, Diamondbacks Jarrod Parker #9 and again, Giants Madison Bumgarner #10. For what it is worth, the Giants could have had Bumgarner as their 10th best player that they wanted going into the draft. If Moskos or Vitters would have been still available, SF might have simply selected Moskos or Vitters instead and waited to see if Bumgarner would have made it to the second round. But as fate and luck would have it, the Cubs and Pirates would be the victims in that 2007 first round and take Moskos and Vitters off the draft board so SF could take Bumgarner instead. (PS, the Tigers drafted Rick Porcello with their 27th pick in 2007). To be honest, the Tigers can scout and rate players better than most teams, but if other teams are taking the top players in front of you, it makes things a bit harder to compensate for....
  21. The compensation system only really worked when teams lost a lot of players due to free agency. The Tigers were always more focused on trying to build a better team then letting some of their better players leave so they could get comp picks back in return. The Nationals were not trying to hold a good team together and the A's were masters at figuring out if a player was about to be a free agent at the end of the year, could the A's get a better value by trading that same player during the year for prospects or get a better line on prospects if that same player refused arbitration and went elsewhere. You'll also notice that the A's and Nationals have mixed results even when they took advantage of the comp system too...
  22. That's why I mentioned the Braves. From 1991 to 2005 everybody thought their favorite team just needed to do things the way the Atlanta Braves did. I haven't heard fans or baseball pundits mentioning the way the Braves "do it" anymore as the best model. My point is that, if I could look into a crystal ball and say that just 3 of the Tigers next 6 first round draft picks will be with the MLB team and playing near all-star production, you'd think the Tigers are doing it "right" too. To your question, it is a "combination" because I don't think the Braves suddenly forgot how to draft like the braves used too and that's why they are not the same dominate team they once were. SIX YEARS AGO, the Red Soxs signed Carlos Martinez to a $140,000 contract that was voided by MLB because Martinez was a bit fuzzy about his real name and his date of birth. After a one year suspension by MLB, the St. Louis Cardinals gave Martinez a $1.5 million dollar signing bonus to sign as a minor league free agent in 2010. By way of comparison, the Tigers were paying Bobby Seay $2.5 million for 2010 season. A lot of teams passed on Martinez because that $1.5M was real money that could have been put to use building a major league roster but the Cardinals were kooky enough to bet on Mr. Martinez and see what would happen. If your not keeping up with the Cardinals, Martinez has a season ERA of 3.01 through 28 starts. Martinez has lowered his three year career ERA to 3.55. Max Scherzer is pitching this year with a 2.90 ERA, but he's costing the Nationals over $17M this year, Martinez is costing the Cardinals just $520,000 for 2015.... And to answer your question more pointedly, skill in drafting and evaluating talent is important to give an organization the best CHANCE of that prospect helping your organization. However, I personally would rather have the Tigers owned the LUCKIEST mlb scout in history, I'd rather have had names like: Carlos Martinez, Mike Piazza, Keith Hernandez, Mark Buehrle and Kenny Rogers than get names like Kasey Kike, Daniel Moskos, Billy Rowell, Barret Loux or Josh Vitters.
  23. To be honest, the Cardinals have been extremely lucky with player development the past ten years. The pitching staff has players like Jaime García, Michael Wacha, Carlos Martínez and they have also developed players like Matt Carpenter, Kolten Wong and Stephen Piscotty. To me the Cardinals are simply much better than average the past few years with player development than other teams. Matt Carpenter was drafted in the 13th round of the 2009 draft. Jamie Garcia 22nd round of 2005 draft Kolten Wong 1st round 2011 draft Stephen Piscotty 1st round 2012 draft Carlos Martínez Originally signed by the Boston Red Sox as an international free agent in 2009. MLB voided his contract for discrepancies over his name and date of birth and the Cardinals swooped in and signed him in 2010. Michael Wacha 1st round 2012 draft My point here is, not only is the Cardinals #1 draft picks represented on the Cardinals MLB roster, but so are players from the 13th round, the 22nd round and even a player the Cardinals took a chance on who was a international free agent. The Cardinals simply have been both very good and extremely lucky with their building and grooming of minor league talent. And remember, for a time, the Atlanta Braves was pretty amazing at obtaining and grooming young talent too......
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