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11 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

I didn't mean to imply he would turtle.  I don't think he ever did.

I just think he baited and whined and fouled hard figuring it was all good because he was pursuing a win, and if someone swung at him, it was on.  He also did not like it when he got served his own medicine.

I guess my larger point is I don't know if it was strategy/gamesmanship, or just run of the mill ***holery that happened to work in his milieu and it just was who he was all the time.

i think it was general *** holery.  

still today he comes across as an arrogant ***.

i wish they would have interviewed laimbeer instead of isiah for that jordan kiss *** piece.  laimbeer wouldnt have been apologetic like isiah.  and he hasnt changed his story ten times like isiah does, trying to make everyone happy all the time.

laimbeer would have laid it out: yeah we walked out, big ******* deal?  lots of people didnt shake hands back in those days?  so ******* what?  youre still whining about people not shaking your hand and you call US bitches?

btw, i watched sixers-celtics from game 7 in 1982.  sixers won.  guess what?  they didnt shake hands.

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2 hours ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

Laimbeer was a really talented player and was a passive aggressive personality on the court.  He whined consistently at everyone about anything, and maybe that was a strategy, but I suspect it just is who he is.  I've known people like that, I'd guess most people have.  He just did it in front of people on a basketball court.

He would fight when someone got tired of putting up with him.

The idea of him coaching all those WNBA team just cracks me up because it seems so absolutely against type. I'd also note that Laimbeer was was a rich Bostoin white kid (and a smart asz'd one to boot!). It wasn't like he was ever going to be just one of the guys from the 'hood in terms of relating to other players, even on his own team. 

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He was from Chicago, wasn't he?

Oddly enough, he was probably closest to Isiah in terms of personality and attitude, though Isiah was more diplomatic.

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1 hour ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

They probably did interview Laimbeer and then they cut it out!

I don't imagine he would be an easy interview on the Bulls. Likely to give it back to the interviewer as much as answer the questions.

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2 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

He was from Chicago, wasn't he?

Family from (and born in) Boston, yes, then raised in Chicago as per is bio.

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Bill coaching a WNBA team made sense in my mind.

His domineering act never was going to fly with NBA players, I can't feature him recruiting, so college is out (plus Bobby Knight style was becoming less and acceptable there).

But he understands the game, was detailed focused and demanded it from his players. I suspect he and his teams were better prepared than most WNBA teams most nights.

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10 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

Bill coaching a WNBA team made sense in my mind.

His domineering act never was going to fly with NBA players, I can't feature him recruiting, so college is out (plus Bobby Knight style was becoming less and acceptable there).

But he understands the game, was detailed focused and demanded it from his players. I suspect he and his teams were better prepared than most WNBA teams most nights.

yeah - clearly he made it work, but it still makes me laugh.

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4 minutes ago, Gehringer_2 said:

yeah - clearly he made it work, but it still makes me laugh.

Why?

Him coaching women?

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I was watching a very early bit of the famed Pistons-Nuggets game from 1983, the one that went 186-184.  Laimbeer was offensively posting up quite a bit, much more so than I remember him doing in the latter part of his career.  It was really odd to see.

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2 hours ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

Why?

Him coaching women?

Comedy exists in the juxtapostion of contradictions? And in this case on so many possible levels. Did he even want to be coaching women? Did his success at it actually make it less likely he'd ever be hired in the NBA if that had been his original goal, that he achieved success in a second sphere possibly by being the opposite person he was in a previous success -- - just all kinds of possible ironies. 

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I don't know what his motivation was.

I suspect the end goal was to get a NBA coaching gig.  I'd guess he burned too many bridges over the years to land on someone else's NBA staff, he wasn't going to coach college, and Davidson had a team that needed a coach, so he figured it was a good a set up as any he'd get.

Entirely speculation, but that'd be my guess how it played out.

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I remember an anecdote where he got called in to run a practice for NBA draft prospects at the Palace during the time he was coaching the Shock.

He was continually correcting players, berating at least a few for lack of effort, and apparently the scouts, as well as some prospects, were rolling their eyes at him basically correcting and controlling to the most minor of details.

I'm guessing he was that way with the Shock players.

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Didn't Laimbeer leave the Shock to be an assistant coach in the NBA? After three championships in the WNBA to jump to an NBA assistant makes me think he wanted an NBA job.

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According to Wikipedia his reason for quitting the Shock was to pursue becoming a NBA coach and took a bench job with the T-Wolves.

He returned to the WNBA after the T-Wolves and has been a coach / GM since.

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9 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

According to Wikipedia his reason for quitting the Shock was to pursue becoming a NBA coach and took a bench job with the T-Wolves.

He returned to the WNBA after the T-Wolves and has been a coach / GM since.

Maybe after spending some time around today's NBA athletes he decided would rather work with the women after all. :cool:

(or maybe he was just about to get canned. You wouldn't think he needed the money, but who knows)

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26 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

Maybe women as a group are more used to dealing with demanding men than men are.

post of the day.

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I don't know much about the WNBA, but I gather the players don't make more than the coaches like the NBA and the players don't have the ability to run the show like in the NBA.

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17 hours ago, Buddha said:

i think it was general *** holery.  

still today he comes across as an arrogant ***.

i wish they would have interviewed laimbeer instead of isiah for that jordan kiss *** piece.  laimbeer wouldnt have been apologetic like isiah.  and he hasnt changed his story ten times like isiah does, trying to make everyone happy all the time.

laimbeer would have laid it out: yeah we walked out, big ******* deal?  lots of people didnt shake hands back in those days?  so ******* what?  youre still whining about people not shaking your hand and you call US bitches?

btw, i watched sixers-celtics from game 7 in 1982.  sixers won.  guess what?  they didnt shake hands.

Laimbeer did get interviewed and he was unsurprisingly unapologetic saying why would they shake their hands when the Bulls insulted their legacy and called them bad people before Game 4, he called the Bulls whiners and congratulated them on beating an aging Pistons team. In other words, Bill being Bill.

That's the main difference between Isiah and Laimbeer. It still burns Isiah to this day that he wasn't universally loved and especially in Chicago where Jordan took that from him right off the hop in his pro career whereas Laimbeer just doesn't give a ****. He did it his way and if nobody likes it, oh well that's their problem.

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BTW, you guys should check out "Film Room" on NBA TV of the 30 year anniversary of Pistons-Lakers 1988 Game 6 with Isiah, Worthy and Salley sitting down and discussing the game. That damn game still bothers me.

It was great stuff especially the Laimbeer "foul" on Kareem and the back and forth they had of no foul vs. foul. They also told some behind the scenes stories about the treatment of Isiah's injury, parties, Laimbeer actually coming into the Lakers locker room afterwards with Isiah after the loss. It was a fun interaction.

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