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Coronavirus: Coming to a Neighborhood Near You?

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More gov PSAs during the ball game - nobody with a mask.

4000 deaths in the last 4 days and quarter million cases this week. 

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I think socializing becomes a bigger deal in secondary school where many students participate in sports or other activities.  

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13 minutes ago, smr-nj said:

I once had a teacher practically scream in my face “I’m not your friend!”

Well, alrighty then. 😂

Just for clarification, I was a teenager, and I’m pretty certain my friends and I were being annoying/ obnoxious.  We laughed.  Eventually, teacher did, too.

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4 minutes ago, tiger337 said:

I think socializing becomes a bigger deal in secondary school where many students participate in sports or other activities.  

Right.  Which is why daughter wanted to go to a high school:  to run track, participate in band/choir and have a prom.  

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2 minutes ago, smr-nj said:

Just for clarification, I was a teenager, and I’m pretty certain my friends and I were being annoying/ obnoxious.  We laughed.  Eventually, teacher did, too.

When I think back to the teachers who were, "friends," of the kids in high school they weren't our best teachers.  

But I remember seeing a teacher in the face of a fifth grade girl (not mine) screaming like a drill sergeant.  It was shocking.

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1 hour ago, tiger337 said:

I think socializing becomes a bigger deal in secondary school where many students participate in sports or other activities.  

What is being suggested is at Kindergarten (and pre-school), a fairly significant part of the learning experience is for the student to learn how to behave appropriately in a group setting as well as how to interact positively and develop interpersonal skills.

Obviously those things can be developed in other settings, but when people speak of socializing at the say age 4-6 range, they mean developing interpersonal skills as opposed to hanging out with Sarah at the mall or joining the school's team.

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I think most studies demonstrate the most effective teachers are those who are challenging while remaining positive, fair, and objective.

Much like parenting and coaching.

It is much easier to write than execute, however. 

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6 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

What is being suggested is at Kindergarten (and pre-school), a fairly significant part of the learning experience is for the student to learn how to behave appropriately in a group setting as well as how to interact positively and develop interpersonal skills.

Obviously those things can be developed in other settings, but when people speak of socializing at the say age 4-6 range, they mean developing interpersonal skills as opposed to hanging out with Sarah at the mall or joining the school's team.

Maybe.  Not having children, this is not my area of expertise.  

It seems like all throughout school from kindergarten on up, I saw more examples of bad behavior at school than good.  I found myself often wondering why kids wanted to be jerks and why teachers yelled at students unnecessarily (and not always the jerks) .   But then I am an introvert living in a world designed by and for the benefit of extroverts.  

 

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13 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

What is being suggested is at Kindergarten (and pre-school), a fairly significant part of the learning experience is for the student to learn how to behave appropriately in a group setting as well as how to interact positively and develop interpersonal skills.

Obviously those things can be developed in other settings, but when people speak of socializing at the say age 4-6 range, they mean developing interpersonal skills as opposed to hanging out with Sarah at the mall or joining the school's team.

That IS the thing.  My kids had the opportunity to learn to not be a little savages by attending church and other activities with us and being expected to be civilized.  They also had opportunities to play with siblings and neighborhood kids and learn important lessons such as, "If you bite you might get bitten back and nobody will want to play with you."

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I was really impressed with the quality of education my sons received, FWIW, and what has been described was not the norm for them

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32 minutes ago, tiger337 said:

Maybe.  Not having children, this is not my area of expertise.  

It seems like all throughout school from kindergarten on up, I saw more examples of bad behavior at school than good.  I found myself often wondering why kids wanted to be jerks and why teachers yelled at students unnecessarily (and not always the jerks) .   But then I am an introvert living in a world designed by and for the benefit of extroverts.  

 

actually I think in the modern school environment may in many cases be too controlling to allow children to fully develop relational management skills. The experience my children had was certainly one where the staff spent their time carefully managing all aspects of student interaction, in mortal fear of any independent decision making by children. I can't criticize them that much because the reason they were afraid of student management of their own relational situations was two fold: First, that they had no safe (from their perspective) disciplinary tools for reigning in situations that might begin to deviate from desired outcomes in even the slightest way, and second, they lived in justified mortal fear that some parent would have them before disciplinary action in any case where allowing children to manage their interpersonal relationships produced any outcome that Johnny's parent didn't think would be a major contribution to his matriculation to Harvard.

This is not to be confused with the quality of education they received, but there was a world of difference between the level of agency that my generation was allowed in many aspects of our school lives and that my children were allowed.

I tend to believe having more agency (i.e. risk/consequence) helps drive the growth to responsible adulthood.

Granted it's a fine line, but I thought my children's experience was on the over managed/repressed side.

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I didn't even learn anything my first couple years because my mother (a teacher) taught me how to read and do simple arithmetic ahead of time.  So I spent my early years trying to avoid jerky students and stupid teachers.  I was one of the last to learn how to tie my shoes though. I got yelled at for that a couple of times.  

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I don't remember my teachers yelling much, if at all?

I am sure it happened, but I don't recall it.  I definitely did not like a few teachers and a decent percentage of students, but I suspect that those percentages aren't so different in any walk of life or line of work.

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I think what I regarded as yelling at the time was sometimes just a stern talking to, but there was definitely yelling too.  I remember in first grade there was this kid that used to run around his desk every time the alarm went off.  The teacher used to yell at him all the time.  I knew the kid was acting strange, but I didn't understand why he was getting yelled at.  How would you expect a kid named Kurt Gurtz to behave?  He was a good natured kid and wasn't bothering anyone.  There was this other kid that had a pencil collection which he kept in a box and would make trades with other kids.  One day a teacher yelled at him and said he was tired of his pencil box and reached in and grabbed a whole bunch of his pencils and took them.   I couldn't believe an adult would do something like that.  There were so many examples.    

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My dad taught me how to socialize and behave. He’d say “act like some-BODY” a la Fred Sanford. 

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4 minutes ago, tiger337 said:

This is how I learned to be a misanthrope!

Not a bad thing to be.

Can a misanthrope be viewed with a stanhope?

:alien:

 

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8 minutes ago, tiger337 said:

I think what I regarded as yelling at the time was sometimes just a stern talking to, but there was definitely yelling too.  I remember in first grade there was this kid that used to run around his desk every time the alarm went off.  The teacher used to yell at him all the time.  I knew the kid was acting strange, but I didn't understand why he was getting yelled at.  He was a good natured kid and wasn't bothering anyone.  There was this other kid that had a pencil collection which he kept in a box and would make trades with other kids.  One day a teacher yelled at him and said he was tired of his pencil box and reached in and grabbed a whole bunch of his pencils and took them.   I couldn't believe an adult would do something like that.  There were so many examples.    

I don't remember there being any practical limit to a school's ability to confiscate student property without recourse (which is of course quite different today!). We learned quickly not to bring anything of personal value - which was probably their intent. At least beside our baseball gloves, which were too critical to do without. 

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There are some very talented and wonderful people out there teaching elementary school.  And some very seriously disturbed people too.

I had a guy teaching when I was about 13, he used to throw chalk at people (if he thought they were talking), throw it hard. Once he threw a chalk brush, missed the guy he was throwing at, and hit a girl in the eye.  

 

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, Charles Liston said:

There are some very talented and wonderful people out there teaching elementary school.  And some very seriously disturbed people too.

I had a guy teaching when I was about 13, he used to throw chalk at people (if he thought they were talking), throw it hard. Once he threw a chalk brush, missed the guy he was throwing at, and hit a girl in the eye.  

Did he teach Latin? It would have been a few years after you were that age we had a Latin teacher in HS in Det that threw chalk board erasers at people (the old felt kind). They are pretty soft and his victims generally considered it harmless (of course if you were awake you simply caught it, but that was usually the point of it being thrown) but he caught one young lady once with an errant throw that resulted in her running out the room bawling. And I think he was Canadian. 😱

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I remember being slapped by two different teachers.  Both of them quickly followed the slap with a hug.  I was a mouthy kid.  I'm not sure if my mother knew, but I think she would have backed the teachers.

This was in a public school in Detroit.

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Many of our teachers had paddles. We knew which ones and I kept a low profile in their class. Our shop and science teachers had holes in the paddles, less wind resistance and more sting.

 

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I came up in DoDDs schools.  No yelling, as a rule.  No paddling.  They contacted our fathers at their workplace when we acted out and let me tell you, our parents got it sorted out else it was elevated to dad's superiors.    But they also weren't pissy about stuff like hair length on boys or other dress codes.  Actually stricter at the PX and commissary than at school.  

 

 

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There was no paddling at my school.  If there were was, my father would have made them regret it.  My father was a yeller at times, but would never ever hit us.  

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