Jump to content

IdahoBert

2019 REGULAR SEASON DISCUSSION THREAD

Recommended Posts


29 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

Insert 'joke' about which kids.

All of them.    My grandson started school today, seems like he was just born yesterday.   Time flies.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Mr. Bigglesworth said:

Insert 'joke' about which kids.

Is it wrong to suggest February through October might be less stressful than the rest of the year?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Casimir said:

Is it wrong to suggest February through October might be less stressful than the rest of the year?

When he spends a lot of time traveling with the team, it's harder for  process servers  to catch up with him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, six-hopper said:

When he spends a lot of time traveling with the team, it's harder for  process servers  to catch up with him.

Yeah they wouldn't have any way to.determine what city he was in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now it’s pretty well assured that the Tigers will be the only MLB team in baseball without at least one 20 HR hitter in this “year of the home run.” The Giants are the only other team without at least one right now but they have two guys with 17 and one with 19 and one of them is bound to get to 20 eventually. It can’t all be blamed on Comerica Park either. 

I’m not sure how to look it up but given that the Tigers have been abysmal at Comerica, I’m sure the opposition has had much less trouble hitting home runs than they have. 

I know that this season at least Comerica Park is the 15th easiest park to hit a homer in.  And I know that our opponents have hit a lot more of them than we have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, IdahoBert said:

Right now it’s pretty well assured that the Tigers will be the only MLB team in baseball without at least one 20 HR hitter in this “year of the home run.” The Giants are the only other team without at least one right now but they have two guys with 17 and one with 19 and one of them is bound to get to 20 eventually. It can’t all be blamed on Comerica Park either. 

I’m not sure how to look it up but given that the Tigers have been abysmal at Comerica, I’m sure the opposition has had much less trouble hitting home runs than they have. 

I know that this season at least Comerica Park is the 10th easiest park to hit a homer in.  And I know that our opponents have hit a lot more of them than we have.

(Not counting today) Tigers have hit 47 at home, 75 on the road, have given up 112 at home, 93 on the road. That's a mere 65 HR differential at CoPa. What do you suppose Pythagoras thinks about that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, IdahoBert said:

Right now it’s pretty well assured that the Tigers will be the only MLB team in baseball without at least one 20 HR hitter in this “year of the home run.” The Giants are the only other team without at least one right now but they have two guys with 17 and one with 19 and one of them is bound to get to 20 eventually. It can’t all be blamed on Comerica Park either. 

I’m not sure how to look it up but given that the Tigers have been abysmal at Comerica, I’m sure the opposition has had much less trouble hitting home runs than they have. 

I know that this season at least Comerica Park is the 10th easiest park to hit a homer in.  And I know that our opponents have hit a lot more of them than we have.

I have often wondered about the accuracy of Park Effect calculations, because as far as I know they do not factor in the overall quality of the home team's offense and pitching.  It seems to me that if a team has a big offense and lousy pitching, that will lead to a lot of runs being scored in that team's ballpark, for reasons that are not properly (or at least not wholly) attributable to the park's dimensions and other physical and environmental characteristics.  Which may explain why Park Effect numbers seem to vary pretty widely for a lot of parks from year to year.

There is no doubt that some parks lend themselves to a lot of offense and some depress it.   But the characteristics of the team playing half its games in that park in a given year has a lot to do with the amount of offense that happens there, too.

I know that some of the various Park Effect formulas do include some adjustments, but I have never read anything about an adjustment of the basic Park Effect number for the type of team that plays in a particular park.  Anyone know if any of the formulas do take that into consideration?

By the way, as for the increase in home runs, here are some numbers that highlight it:

Just five years ago, in 2014, the team with the most home runs for the entire season hit 211 of them.  The team with the fewest hit 95.  Only one team, the leader, reached the 200-home-run mark.

This year, as of August 29, with teams having 27-30 games remaining, the top home-run team has already hit 258 jacks, and the team with the fewest home runs has 111.  Eleven teams have already hit more than 200 homers, and 13 more are on pace to reach 200.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, six-hopper said:

I have often wondered about the accuracy of Park Effect calculations, because as far as I know they do not factor in the overall quality of the home team's offense and pitching.  It seems to me that if a team has a big offense and lousy pitching, that will lead to a lot of runs being scored in that team's ballpark, for reasons that are not properly (or at least not wholly) attributable to the park's dimensions and other physical and environmental characteristics.  Which may explain why Park Effect numbers seem to vary pretty widely for a lot of parks from year to year.

There is no doubt that some parks lend themselves to a lot of offense and some depress it.   But the characteristics of the team playing half its games in that park in a given year has a lot to do with the amount of offense that happens there, too.

I know that some of the various Park Effect formulas do include some adjustments, but I have never read anything about an adjustment of the basic Park Effect number for the type of team that plays in a particular park.  Anyone know if any of the formulas do take that into consideration?

 ((homeRS + homeRA)/(homeG)) / ((roadRS + roadRA)/(roadG))

is the formula ESPN uses(substitute Runs or HR or whichever stat). If you have a big offense and lousy pitching, that should still (more or less) cancel out on the top and the bottom. My casual impression over the years is that HR factors still tend to follow whether the park's team has a lot of HR hitters, even though it shouldn't

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Gehringer_2 said:

 ((homeRS + homeRA)/(homeG)) / ((roadRS + roadRA)/(roadG))

is the formula ESPN uses(substitute Runs or HR or whichever stat). If you have a big offense and lousy pitching, that should still (more or less) cancel out on the top and the bottom. My casual impression over the years is that HR factors still tend to follow whether the park's team has a lot of HR hitters, even though it shouldn't

Yes, dividing the home figure by the road figure should essentially cancel out the effect of the team itself and address my concern.  I've never looked that closely at the formulas and assumed that they were more simplistic, focusing only on the runs scored in a park rather than relating one team's home and road performance to assess its home park's "effect."  I should have know better, because the pocket-protector people who do sabermetric analysis tend to be pretty smart.  Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gehringer_2 said:

(Not counting today) Tigers have hit 47 at home, 75 on the road, have given up 112 at home, 93 on the road. That's a mere 65 HR differential at CoPa. What do you suppose Pythagoras thinks about that?

Pythagoras is dead. But like John Brown’s body that lies a-mouldering in the grave, his soul goes marching on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pythagoras would be rolling over in his grave if he had to watch the 2019 Tigers attempt to hit baseballs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The O's are showing slight improvement and are now 4 games ahead of Detroit, and are only 2 games behind KC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, IdahoBert said:

Right now it’s pretty well assured that the Tigers will be the only MLB team in baseball without at least one 20 HR hitter in this “year of the home run.” The Giants are the only other team without at least one right now but they have two guys with 17 and one with 19 and one of them is bound to get to 20 eventually. It can’t all be blamed on Comerica Park either. 

I’m not sure how to look it up but given that the Tigers have been abysmal at Comerica, I’m sure the opposition has had much less trouble hitting home runs than they have. 

I know that this season at least Comerica Park is the 15th easiest park to hit a homer in.  And I know that our opponents have hit a lot more of them than we have.

extend avila!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Article in mlive sure makes it sound like Gardy might be ready to retire. If I were him I'd think long and hard (that's what she said) about continuing on at the helm of this garbage team

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have the Tigers ever took on the characteristic of their ball park since Comerica was erected in 03'. It was built to support good pitching, defense and speed but the Tigers never fit that description. They had some good pitching for awhile but never much on the other two. Even now, they are terrible on defense and have little speed and no contact hitters. Just to find their m.o. is a mystery besides to accumulate as many players as posssible in the Mike I era. Now it's just a sad display of a different mix of minor league talent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Comerica Park excuse does not work because it has never played like an extreme park.   It probably adversely affects some individual players, but overall it has not suppressed offense or even home runs that much.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Champ79' said:

Have the Tigers ever took on the characteristic of their ball park since Comerica was erected in 03'. It was built to support good pitching, defense and speed but the Tigers never fit that description. They had some good pitching for awhile but never much on the other two. Even now, they are terrible on defense and have little speed and no contact hitters. Just to find their m.o. is a mystery besides to accumulate as many players as posssible in the Mike I era. Now it's just a sad display of a different mix of minor league talent.

In today's baseball, when the top teams can hit 300 home runs, and 24 of the 30 clubs have either already hit 200 or are on pace to, emphasizing speed and defense and contact-hitting is not a formula to contend.  Speed and defense and general hitting ability are nice to have, but only as complements to launching bombs, not as a substitute for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...