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Grandparents go home today.  Stubborn old people have to get right home, who cares if you have power or not.  

Sounds like they didn't have any flooding.  Hopefully they lucked out on damage to the house as well.  

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40 minutes ago, Melody said:

I think it's the opposite, John.  After all the destruction of multiple hurricanes in the 90s and early 2000s a lot of communities in Florida updated their building codes to require new construction to be more wind proof.   My mom and stepdad still owned their place in Key West, so I was hearing a lot of discussion about the building codes. 

That would be my guess as well.

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39 minutes ago, Melody said:

I think it's the opposite, John.  After all the destruction of multiple hurricanes in the 90s and early 2000s a lot of communities in Florida updated their building codes to require new construction to be more wind proof.   My mom and stepdad still owned their place in Key West, so I was hearing a lot of discussion about the building codes.  

I kind of put homes built in the 90's in the 'new construction' type category.  That may be the incorrect way to look at it, but I consider homes in the 50's through the early 80's and even earlier as the ones built with better materials.  My house was built in 1961 and my first home was 1950.  They are very well made IMO compared to similar homes built in the aughts and after.

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21 minutes ago, Deleterious said:

Grandparents go home today.  Stubborn old people have to get right home, who cares if you have power or not.  

Sounds like they didn't have any flooding.  Hopefully they lucked out on damage to the house as well.  

We always stick it out during power outages, if that's the only issue.  So do our neighbors who are at least a generation older than us.  It's not so bad.  I have an antique oil lamp that gives off good light, plus a couple of cheap Walmart reproductions that work just as well.  We have one of those butane catering stove burners and a vintage stovetop coffee percolator and a gas grill on the patio.  As long as I have coffee and enough light not to trip over dogs, I'm good.  LOL. 

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14 minutes ago, Melody said:

We always stick it out during power outages, if that's the only issue.  So do our neighbors who are at least a generation older than us.  It's not so bad.  I have an antique oil lamp that gives off good light, plus a couple of cheap Walmart reproductions that work just as well.  We have one of those butane catering stove burners and a vintage stovetop coffee percolator and a gas grill on the patio.  As long as I have coffee and enough light not to trip over dogs, I'm good.  LOL. 

I'm mostly still mad at them for not getting far enough out of the area.  They should have been on a plane here and just waited it out with us.

And I can't yell at my grandparents so you guys get to hear it instead.  xD

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10 minutes ago, Deleterious said:

I'm mostly still mad at them for not getting far enough out of the area.  They should have been on a plane here and just waited it out with us.

And I can't yell at my grandparents so you guys get to hear it instead.  xD

Haha!   That WWII generation gives no figs.

Edit:  Reflecting on my stepdad's grandmother, same goes for WWI generation I guess.  She and her sister were a hoot.   Had some great stories, though, about paddling a boat through the Everglades to school every day when they moved to Florida as children.  IIRC, their father worked building a railroad or something on that order, late 19th century/very early 20th.   

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43 minutes ago, Melody said:

We always stick it out during power outages, if that's the only issue.  So do our neighbors who are at least a generation older than us.  It's not so bad.  I have an antique oil lamp that gives off good light, plus a couple of cheap Walmart reproductions that work just as well.  We have one of those butane catering stove burners and a vintage stovetop coffee percolator and a gas grill on the patio.  As long as I have coffee and enough light not to trip over dogs, I'm good.  LOL. 

I'm a snowflake that can not tolerate 5 minutes without electricity.  You will have to pry my Generac out of my cold dead hands.  

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Not WWII vintage, but that is what my wife calls itchy foot. A few years ago we had the sewer system back up in the sub. I got a call from our next door neighbor about it. He had about 6 inches of water in his basement. We were in Southern Ohio when he called, I set a few speed records until my son checked it out for us.

Better to let them head back rather than worry about possible damage

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3 hours ago, Melody said:

I think it's the opposite, John.  After all the destruction of multiple hurricanes in the 90s and early 2000s a lot of communities in Florida updated their building codes to require new construction to be more wind proof.   My mom and stepdad still owned their place in Key West, so I was hearing a lot of discussion about the building codes.  

Yes, they did mentioned hurricane Andrew as a reason for the updated codes.

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3 hours ago, John_Brian_K said:

I kind of put homes built in the 90's in the 'new construction' type category.  That may be the incorrect way to look at it, but I consider homes in the 50's through the early 80's and even earlier as the ones built with better materials.  My house was built in 1961 and my first home was 1950.  They are very well made IMO compared to similar homes built in the aughts and after.

I wouldn't expect homes built in Michigan to have hurricane resistance countermeasures built into them.

So unless you were checking out homes in Florida or surrounding area, I doubt the specific point Melody is making would apply to the houses you personally looked at.

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I just read that FEMA says at least 25% of the homes in the Keys were completely destroyed.  They are estimating that all of them have at least some damage.    

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1 hour ago, Deleterious said:

This was the staging area in Georgia for power companies waiting to head into Florida.

1x3uavp69nlz.jpg

The undertaking of organizing, not only the vehicles on site there, but also where each vehicle needs to go and directions for those vehicles in terms of which get to start working immediately and which need to wait until other areas are done seems like a massive job.

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3 hours ago, Deleterious said:

This was the staging area in Georgia for power companies waiting to head into Florida.

1x3uavp69nlz.jpg

A beautiful sight!  Coincidentally, just a couple of days ago I came across photos I took three years ago of an electric repairman on a pole behind my house and another of the crew's truck after a storm took out electricity to most of the area.  It was a crew from Heart Electric of Jacksonville, Florida.    We were so appreciative of those guys.

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1 hour ago, Melody said:

A beautiful sight!  Coincidentally, just a couple of days ago I came across photos I took three years ago of an electric repairman on a pole behind my house and another of the crew's truck after a storm took out electricity to most of the area.  It was a crew from Heart Electric of Jacksonville, Florida.    We were so appreciative of those guys.

Yeah, a lot of times those guys are out there in the elements trying to get the power back on for us.  Truly under appreciated.  

The guy in that picture is from Sault Ste. Marie, Canada.  So it was an international effort.

Before the storm I saw some video taken from a car on a Florida expressway.  It was of a Los Angeles fire department truck with a trailer and two boats on it heading in to help.  

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3 hours ago, John_Brian_K said:

The undertaking of organizing, not only the vehicles on site there, but also where each vehicle needs to go and directions for those vehicles in terms of which get to start working immediately and which need to wait until other areas are done seems like a massive job.

I can barely get four couples together on the same day for dinner.  I can't imagine trying to organize huge undertakings like this.

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I just got power back a bit ago, and of course, I'm very thankful to all the trucks that came in from out of area.

Here is a video I shot sometime around the time we lost power on Saturday.  Sorry for so-so quality of the video, I really thought I was going to get whacked by a branch/tree a few times during the wind surges.  Jim Cantore I'm definitely not!

Hurricane Irma's outer band in action.  The was my first go at video with the a99ii, forgive the bad technique--I was a little worried about getting whacked by an uprooted tree!

 

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I like hearing the aftermath stories more so than all the imminent doom pre hurricane stuff.  There never seems to enough people willing to talk about the aftermath.  Those directly impacted do not have the time and probably do not want to relive it, but the volunteers or family of those affected.

Anybody on here have any stories to share about the aftermath?  How are things now?  

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On 9/16/2017 at 9:45 PM, Microline133 said:

Just received my deployment orders. I'll be in Florida supporting the response for the next month as of Tuesday. 

since oblong won't do it....stay safe! or have fun?! and thank you!

(i'm terrible at this)

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Appreciate it. As is often the case when we have multiple ongoing response actions, my plans have now changed. With Jose and Maria spinning, I'm temporarily on hold until they determine where I'm best utilized.

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2 hours ago, Deleterious said:

Sounds like Maria really did a number on Puerto Rico.  

Maria is a b***h.  The entire country without power for months?   I haven't heard a word from my friends in San Juan, but I am comforted by the low death toll.  Still ... the photos from there are terrible.

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