Jump to content

Nastradamus

Mayhew and Lewand fired!

Recommended Posts

I was thinking the same thing. The woman just made the most un-Lion like move we've ever seen. She showed us that she's not messing with the margins.

Hiring someone and firing someone are two completely different things. Can you tell when your car is broken? Do you know how to fix it? (Maybe you do and that was a bad example, but the point I'm making is obvious).

Edit: Or to expand my analogy, assume you know nothing about cars other than your husband owns one. If it breaks down, do you know how to distinguish between the 6 car repair shops by your house? Obviously when it doesn't start you know its broken, but thats the first step. Likely what you do is you call your friend (or child) who knows cars and you trust their opinion. That was my point.

Edited by hardyaf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like you missed the point of what I was saying. I wasn't complaining at all. I was merely stating it is unlikely that she is making the decisions (Or hopefully unlikely she is picking the next GM). She is probably just a figurehead. See my second paragraph.

You are purely speculating. And the grounds of your speculation seem irrelevant. None of us has any way of knowing the dynamics of the decision making process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's funny you mention that because on my ride home from work Wojo & Jamie on 97.1 were talking about how they both think that former FoMoCo CEO Alan Mullay would be a good choice to help oversee the process of finding a new GM, given his success in the private sector.
I think Drew Sharp also made a similar point in the paper. It's ridiculous. For one the skills Mulally had may not even be applicable because we're not talking about a large organization. How many employees do the Lions have, besides players, coaches, and staff associated with them like trainers? A few hundred, at most? I bet it's not even that high. I live a mile from their team HQ and outside of the field house it's not that large. The team's not failing on the field because they have the wrong guy managing their IT or Sales department. It's not failing because of a bloated beauracracy or corporate infighting between executives or too much attention paid to other brands across the globe.

This is very small potatoes for a guy like him.

Speaking of Mulally..... go read American Icon. It's the greatest business book you'll ever read. Fascinating.

I'm not buying the Mullally hype, as much as I think he did a decent job at Ford. The Lions business model isn't the problem. The problem is they don't know how to identify & coach talent. They're making money. They need somebody to run the football side of things that knows what they're doing. Who that might be I have no earthly idea. I thought Millen was a good hire & I picked them to win 13 games this season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You are purely speculating. And the grounds of your speculation seem irrelevant. None of us has any way of knowing the dynamics of the decision making process.

Everyone is speculating. No one knows anything. Your speculation is just as irrelevant. Martha Ford will not be the primary person deciding who the next GM is. And if she is, it's pretty unlikely she will be able to identify the optimal person.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not buying the Mullally hype, as much as I think he did a decent job at Ford. The Lions business model isn't the problem. The problem is they don't know how to identify & coach talent. They're making money. They need somebody to run the football side of things that knows what they're doing. Who that might be I have no earthly idea. I thought Millen was a good hire & I picked them to win 13 games this season.

Think of the money they could make with a decent product. You don't flush years and years of mediocrity by hanging on to the same model.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Everyone is speculating. No one knows anything. Your speculation is just as irrelevant. Martha Ford will not be the primary person deciding who the next GM is. And if she is, it's pretty unlikely she will be able to identify the optimal person.

My speculation is just as irrelevant as yours? What speculation? I haven't speculated about anything in this thread. (Not that there is any reason for you or anyone not to speculate; that's what message boards are for.)

All I've said was that since WCF died, front office changes have come just about as quickly as one could have imagined, given that the team made the playoffs last season (with probably the best defense the franchise has ever fielded). I don't know what more Lions fans could ask for or expect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good article by Lynn Henning...

Experts agree: Quinn, Wolf should top Lions list

Ironically, a curious NFL trend could play into the Lions favor as team leaders hunt for their next general manager and personnel head.

It has to do with the national landscape. And with a pro football marketplace experts regard as being uncommonly thin in blue-chip candidates for a job that most directly affects a NFL club’s fortunes.

The very fact the pool appears small but still holds potentially bright GMs could become a Lions edge, experts argue.

Two possible remedies for a nearly 60-year championship drought in Detroit are among scouts and front-office contenders the Lions could interview in the coming weeks or, perhaps months, following Thursday’s firings of president Tom Lewand and general manager Martin Mayhew.

Bob Quinn, 39, the Patriots director of pro scouting, is considered a future GM whose skills at grading talent is part of New England’s regular seat among the NFL elite.

Likewise, Eliot Wolf, 33, director of player personnel for the Packers is another bright light whose eye for players and whose lifelong exposure to Green Bay’s culture makes him all but certain at some stage to snag a GM’s job and perhaps begin building a brand of roster in the Packers’ image.

Several former NFL general managers praised Wolf, son of retired Packers championship architect Ron Wolf, whose Super Bowl teams were built around Brett Favre then stretched into the Aaron Rodgers era, all because of an organization’s long-term skill at designing balanced, mostly home-grown rosters.

Those same GMs requested anonymity because of sensitivity to clubs and colleagues with whom they still work.

But another NFL personnel standout, Gil Brandt, who helped construct a yesteryear Cowboys dynasty, and who regularly is consulted by NFL and college teams, said Friday the Lions would be smart to hand their franchise keys to Quinn.

“I think he’s Secretariat,” said Brandt, an analyst for NFL.com who who compared Quinn with the Triple Crown thoroughbred winner from 1973.

“There’s nobody close to this guy as far as knowledge and ability to evaluate. He understands analytics, he understands the salary cap, and this guy, to me, is a superior evaluator of people and players.”

Quinn has been with the Patriots in a stream of scouting posts since 2000. He has undergrad and graduate degrees from Connecticut.

Wolf, likewise, has dazzled because of personnel wits that remind people of his dad. What Wolf and Quinn bring, say the GMs who were interviewed along with Brandt, is familiarity with the “ways” a successful franchise operates. It is methodology as well as philosophy, they say, that becomes a difference-maker in personnel assessment.

When she announced Thursday the exits of Lewand and Mayhew, Lions owner Martha Firestone Ford made clear Detroit would dig deeply into the national market to find a personnel general with insight and the skills to build consistent playoff-grade teams.

The absence of such mastery, or in some cases even base competence, has been blamed for decades of struggles and frustrations fairly unique to the Lions and alien to teams such as the Packers and Patriots.

Why there appears to be such a dearth of Grade A talent competing for a GM’s job in the supposedly dreamy NFL is in one sense mystifying but is no surprise to the GMs interviewed and to Brandt.

“It’s a hard job, it’s so multi-faceted,” Brandt said. “What we did 20 years ago was one percent of what we do now in a NFL front office. What we did 10 years ago is 15 percent of what we do today.”

One of the former GMs who chose not to be identified agreed with Brandt. The problem, he said, is NFL personnel jobs have become specialized, virtually from the point of entry.

It was common in earlier decades for front-office types to have worked in college and in pro scouting, they say, to have had input on contracts, to have worked on matters with the league office. There was resume diversity.

This is separate from a new era that arrived in 1994: the NFL salary cap. It is not that the cap is overwhelmingly difficult to process, said one of the NFL GMs, but that too few scouts with front-office credentials are being sufficiently exposed to it early enough in their careers.

Departments have gotten larger within NFL franchises. Responsibility for the salary cap and its intricacies often are designated, as is the case with so many football disciplines, to select people or carriers.

That can make skills integration difficult, if not all but non-existent, within many NFL organizations.

The best remedy there, said all the men interviewed, is to look at people who have been exposed continually to ongoing success and methods. In other words, at men who have been crafted throughout their careers by winning regimes and by the machinations that have made Super Bowls an occasional, if not regular, stop for teams such as the Packers and Patriots.

There are few concerns about the Lions, said the former GMs, even with their dark history.

It is because the Lions long have been renowned for resources: facilities, budgets, not to mention a fan base with 80-year NFL roots that is starved for any semblance of a title contender.

Any anxiety on the part of candidates, the GMs said, would center on ownership. Is there a line of succession established beyond Martha Firestone Ford? Will the franchise remain in family hands? Will it be sold? Who will be in charge?

Those questions, of course, figure to be answered once a formal interview process begins. The Lions at that time will be seeking their own answers, with their primary question shared by Detroit’s football community:

What person can turn a strife-weary franchise into a respected team and winner?

lynn.henning@detroitnews.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All these articles, like Henning's above, prognosticating about who the Lions should hire is the most exciting thing to happen this season. Who would have thought you could enjoy the search for a new General Manager this much. I guess as a Lions fan, since this type of process is foreign to us all, its got the zeal of being new and exciting. Gosh I hope Martha doesn't screw it all up and temper my excitement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be happy with "not Sheldon White" or anyone else associated with the franchise under Mr. Millen or Mr. Mayhew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm getting pretty sold on Quinn. I like him and Decosta the most based on what I've heard. From a winning organization is the biggest key though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm getting pretty sold on Quinn. I like him and Decosta the most based on what I've heard. From a winning organization is the biggest key though.

I'm really excited about Eric DeCosta from the Ravens. Trouble is, every article I've read and interviews I've seen with him, make it sound like he's a surefire replacement for Ozzie Newsome. It sounds like his family and life are entrenched in Baltimore and it would take a huge effort and vast amount of money to pry him away from Baltimore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been saying this for years, but you always assured me that Mayhew was already that guy. Not surprising that you would make it seem so easy.

You can talk about past arguments, or you can continue with the current one. I've eaten my crow, I am still here. Everything isn't as complicated as you always try and make it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mine... when I interview candidates Tater I tend to avoid hypothetical questions about what they would or wouldn't do, what they think, or how they'd define something (too easy for someone to talk their way into a job). I like asking about what they've done. Yours is great – I'd just restate it: Tell me about what you've done to sustain success in today's NFL, and how did your organization achieve it? They have no choice but to give me real tangible evidence of past performance, not fluff. In other words, why the f--- should I hire you? What the f--- have you ever done in the NFL? Tell me why should I even listen to your dumb ***, you f---?*

*"Lionized" interviewer

I am on the other side of the fence. I don't need to ask them what they have done. If you're interviewing someone to run an NFL team you damn well better be sure about what they have done. Tell me what you will do, and how.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lions Hire Outside Search Firm

ALLEN PARK — The Detroit Lions have taken their first major step toward assembling their new front office.

Owner Martha Firestone Ford has hired an outside search firm to help her replace fired general manager Martin Mayhew and president Tom Lewand, according to NFL Network's Gil Brandt.....

Good move by Mrs. Ford.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Titans won today. We are now the only team in football with fewer than 2 wins. We control our own destiny for the 1st pick. Here's hoping we lose out.

I like the model of having a coach with full control. I would throw the checkbook at Jon Gruden, but I would also like to see where John Harbaugh's head is at if he is out of Baltimore after this season.

It all comes down to gutting the front office, scouting department, and coaching staff after the season. Everyone goes. Having a totally new brain trust and the number 1 pick would be ideal. Then they could begin the rebuild by shipping off older players for as many picks as possible.

Stafford's future will be interesting. I don't see any QB's coming out this year that I would select number 1 overall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gruden is most likely content making big time money with ESPN with no stress. I think he is getting head coaching money doing what he is doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some guys have that competitive itch though. I wouldn't give Gruden full control. Hire a personnel expert first and foremost.

Todd Haley's a guy I think would be a great fit here in addition to Kyle Shanahan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought it would be kind of a cool way to call plays...online. Let the fans who have registered and have secure connections etc...discuss plays and strategies in real time and have them vote on plays as they happen. Have those plays communicated immediately to the QB or the MLB (or whoever has the mic on the defense)

Talk about fan interaction. Then only a small % of fans could ***** and moan about a loss. The % who voted for the other plays as opposed to the one that was ultimately picked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I always thought it would be kind of a cool way to call plays...online. Let the fans who have registered and have secure connections etc...discuss plays and strategies in real time and have them vote on plays as they happen. Have those plays communicated immediately to the QB or the MLB (or whoever has the mic on the defense)

Talk about fan interaction. Then only a small % of fans could ***** and moan about a loss. The % who voted for the other plays as opposed to the one that was ultimately picked.

Joe Lombardi was actually interviewed in the off-season and mentioned this very idea. He was saying though that it could be simplified by being multiple choice. His example is listed below . . .

A) Throw 2 yard Screen to Joique Bell

B) Throw 3 yard Screen to Joique Bell

C) HB Smash to Joique Bell

D) 20 yard Slant to Calvin Johnson

E) Just kidding about D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joe Lombardi was actually interviewed in the off-season and mentioned this very idea. He was saying though that it could be simplified by being multiple choice. His example is listed below . . .

A) Throw 2 yard Screen to Joique Bell

B) Throw 3 yard Screen to Joique Bell

C) HB Smash to Joique Bell

D) 20 yard Slant to Calvin Johnson

E) Just kidding about D

Well no wonder he failed this year. Without Bell 60% of his play book was gone and the other 40% didn't count.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I always thought it would be kind of a cool way to call plays...online. Let the fans who have registered and have secure connections etc...discuss plays and strategies in real time and have them vote on plays as they happen. Have those plays communicated immediately to the QB or the MLB (or whoever has the mic on the defense)

Talk about fan interaction. Then only a small % of fans could ***** and moan about a loss. The % who voted for the other plays as opposed to the one that was ultimately picked.

Wasn't there a minor league team that did something like this as a gimmick for a game? In reality it would be impossible to do within the standard play clock. And it wouldn't really accomplish your hopes JBK because:

1.) Most of the time it would be 60% or 70% voted for play X. So only the other 30% can complain... it would be 15% voted for play-X, 14% for play-Y, 14% for play-Z. 10% for play-A, 9% for play-B, 8% for play-C, 8% for play-D, 7% for play-E, and 15% for a dozen other plays. So when play-X fails you still have 85% of the voters complaining.

AND...

2.) Of the 15% who did vote for play-X, 60% will blame the players for failing to execute it properly, and 30% will blame the refs for missing and obvious call against the opposing team that prevented the play from working.

So you'll end up with about 10% of 15% of voters who don't complain. Maybe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...