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Daniel Norris to have surgery to remove cancer

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danielnorris18 - I've been debating for months as to how or even if I should share this with people. - I'm a firm believer in the power of prayer. So now, I'm asking for prayers. - A few months ago, after I was optioned to AAA, I found out I had a growth on my thyroid. Flying back & forth from Toronto to Buffalo after pitching to have more and more tests done it was finally concluded that the growth is considered malignant.. Meaning it contained the C word.. cancer. Hearing this was alarming, yea. Weird, yea, that too. I was given the option to shut my year down & get it removed immediately. However, seeing another doctor that determined I could wait until the end of the season reassured my gut feeling. Just Keep Playing. Baseball kept me sane. Regardless of results on the field, I forgot about it when I was between the lines. Afterall, I was just trying to get the heck out of AAA. & I did. I was revived with an opportunity, a blessing from God, with the Tigers back in the Big Leagues. So yea, the power of prayer.. It got me through this season. Now that it's over it's time to get this thing out, so please keep me in your thoughts & prayers as I undergo surgery & come out 100% cancer free! As always,,, #justkeeplivin

https://instagram.com/p/9CJCkzxaX9/?taken-by=danielnorris18

Wishing you the best man.

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Whoa. That's terrible.

I assume this was known to the Tigers when they traded for him.

I have to question why he wouldn't get it removed immediately. I'm not a cancer doctor but isn't it a big risk to prolong surgery? Isn't there a danger that it can spread to other areas?

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I've always thought that but they told him there wasn't a risk so maybe the thyroid is just different.

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Just saw that...Damn. Hope the surgery takes care of it and he doesn't have any relapse. Scary, especially at his age.

Not to trivialize this at all, so I hope no one takes it this way, but I assume that this was disclosed prior to the trade, since it seems as if the Blue Jays were aware of it earlier in the season? Just curious what the protocol would be, and if it is discovered that the Tigers were unaware of this condition, would there be some penalty the Blue Jays would incur?

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It's amazing what he did this year with the problem. Shows what kind of special talent he is.

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They say if you get cancer that's the one to get. Not disclosing a cancer diagnosis would be almost fraud. No way that was hidden.

But I do wonder if a player has any obligation to tell a club if he got that diagnosed on his own? I wouldn't have to tell mine.

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They say if you get cancer that's the one to get. Not disclosing a cancer diagnosis would be almost fraud. No way that was hidden.

But I do wonder if a player has any obligation to tell a club if he got that diagnosed on his own? I wouldn't have to tell mine.

I would imagine anything health related would have to be disclosed as part of their contract.

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I would imagine anything health related would have to be disclosed as part of their contract.

I would think it's worded in a way about ability to play or report on time. Or maybe any surgery. Medical privacy laws are tight.

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I would think it's worded in a way about ability to play or report on time. Or maybe any surgery. Medical privacy laws are tight.

True enough. I'd be curious to know how this is handled.

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True enough. I'd be curious to know how this is handled.

I would think that there is some language indicating that the player has a responsibility to bring any health concerns to the attention of the team/team doctor immediately for inspection and diagnosis. I don't know if contracts could be voided if a player fails to do that (either with an injury potentially suffered on the field or something off the field like cancer). But in general, you would assume that the team wants its doctors to run whatever tests are needed anytime they are needed.

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For performance related issues yes. But if it's January and feel stomach pains they don't expect you to fly to Detroit to get it checked out. If you see a moleon your arm and an exam finds its cancerous but can be removed do they have to know about it? Or if you have oral surgery. It's just a curiosity of mine. Are you technically an employee of the club or is it considered something else?

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Whoa. That's terrible.

I assume this was known to the Tigers when they traded for him.

I have to question why he wouldn't get it removed immediately. I'm not a cancer doctor but isn't it a big risk to prolong surgery? Isn't there a danger that it can spread to other areas?

I don't necessarily think it's a huge risk with thyroid cancer. Iirc, a lot of the time they're not even 100% sure if it's malignant, but a possible malignant tumor. Delaying surgery a couple months was probably not especially risky.

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I've always thought that but they told him there wasn't a risk so maybe the thyroid is just different.

No, its not. It really depends on the sort of cancer he has. There are 3 kinds. There are also variances of these kinds. I have the slow growing one and needed two thyroid surgeries to have the cancer removed. Even now I still have cancer and it spread into my lymph node, so all bets are off.

Long story short if anyone has thyroid cancer do not take it lightly, get it removed ASAP. It is also a "real" cancer, you may need multiple surgeries, and radiation treatment.

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I don't necessarily think it's a huge risk with thyroid cancer. Iirc, a lot of the time they're not even 100% sure if it's malignant, but a possible malignant tumor. Delaying surgery a couple months was probably not especially risky.

You realize this is a potential fatal situation? Also biopsys are often wrong, which apparently frequently happens. If it is the aggressive sort of cancer, its a huge deal. Even if it is not, it can go South in a hurry.

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No, its not. It really depends on the sort of cancer he has. There are 3 kinds. There are also variances of these kinds. I have the slow growing one and needed two thyroid surgeries to have the cancer removed. Even now I still have cancer and it spread into my lymph node, so all bets are off.

Long story short if anyone has thyroid cancer do not take it lightly, get it removed ASAP. It is also a "real" cancer, you may need multiple surgeries, and radiation treatment.

Damn, sorry to hear that.

Any guess as to why they would tell him that it's fine and he can wait til the offseason?

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Damn, sorry to hear that.

Any guess as to why they would tell him that it's fine and he can wait til the offseason?

Thank you

From what I can infer the first doctor wanted to do the surgery ASAP. He got a second opinion, and they said he could wait. Likely the second doctor found it to be papillary, which means it is the slow growing cancer. It probably is a small growth, as well. Papillary cancer can be in thyroid for years and never spread. However, the biopsy could be wrong (mine stated I had no cancer, I had 2 pounds removed) and it could be another form. They won't know 100% until after it is removed and tested. If it is fluid filled that biopsy is really inaccurate until they have it removed.

I'd guess they are unsure if it is cancerous is because there are certain markers they look for when they do the biopsy. I would guess his came back elevated but only slightly. Hopefully he doesn't have a variance of papillary cancer with some follicular properties because that could go bad quickly, which is why he should not have waited.

More than likely he will have the surgery and be fine in a couple of weeks, but it was a needless risk. he might need some Radiation treatment to make sure all the thyroid cancer cells are dead, but that shouldn't affect him any, long term. If you ever get thyroid cancer and I pray no one does, please don't wait.

Edited by MAROTH4MVP

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I had my thyroid out in two separate operations. I had a softball sized benign growth and half of my thryorid out in 2008 and a large potato sized growth and the other half out in 2010. For some reason, the first surgeon didn't tell me there was a second growth when he did the first operation for the softball in 2008. The CAT scan showed it was there...he didn't even biopsy it. I didn't even know the second growth was there until my speech and breathing changed in 2010 (raspy voice and a wheeze). That's when the fun really began. IIRC...Most thyroid cancers are easier to deal with...high 90's cure rate with very few side effects long term. If it's going to kill you..it's going to kill you quickly (high 90's mortality with 18-24 months) and there isn't much you can do about that.

For me, the struggle was dealing with not having a thyroid. You have to slowly walk your thyroid lvels up..You can't just take a lot of thyroid all at once. I struggled for a year to get back to normal. My MD sent me to an endocrinologist who put me on Armour thyroid instead of a synthetic. Apparently...a certain number of people don't process the synthetic optimally...even if the blood levels look ok. Hell...for all I know it was mental. My biggest concern for Norris is dealing with not having a thyroid (assuming he has a complete thyroidectomy) and the potential issues with his parathyroid gland. The parathyroid controls calcium levels. If your body loses that...you have to carry around Tums for the rest of your life because suddenly running out of calcium is a very very big issue.

Waiting for the surgery is less of an issue in my mind....if it's a slow growth tumor waiting a few months to take it out shouldn't be a problem. Hell, it took them four months to get my softball taken out.

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The chances of his parathyroid being an issue is almost nothing.

Cancer is very serious. It is true most thyroid cancers are "easy" to deal with. But a lot aren't. It's a completely different ball game than growths that are not cancerous.

Since he probably has cancer, he will more than likely be prescribed a high enough level of replacement hormone that it won't be an issue.

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