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RedRamage

How much longer do we wait for Castellanos?

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The Royals showed a lot of patience with Moustakis, and eventually it paid off. Perhaps the same will hold true for Nick.

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Nah, to me Machado is destined to be a Ramon Santiago. Nothing wrong with that. Teams need a multi-positional infielder and he could have a long career doing that. But I don't see him as an everyday third baseman. Unless he wants to change his name to Manny.......

Machado does not have the skill set for 3rd, definitely for short. He is much more like Iglasias than he is Santiago.

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I still it would have been very interesting to see how his career may have progressed if he had been able to be full time super-sub player. 2004 was his best year offensively except for power (but still his career best OPS). And to have a guy on the bench who can could step into any position on the field and be at least an average defender and at least be an average hitter... that would be an amazing tool to have.

Obviously there no telling if his offensive would have maintained the level it did in 2004 if he was a super-sub player, but if it had... that would be a very interesting player to have. Sort of an "anti-DH" player: Pencil the 2004-Inge in at spot 7 or 8 or 9 in the lineup, and then his position just rotates around the field. First base, Second base, SS, etc. Which ever position he plays in the field, that guy is the DH for that day giving each starter a regular 1/2 day off without any drop off in offense and not a significant (if any) drop off in defense.

Now, this is an "Utopian" situation of course with lots of problems: 1.) Not everyone can DH successfully... some players can't handle not being in the field. 2.) Injuries to starts would likely press an player like this into a start roll, at least temporarily. 3.) Perhaps most importantly: A player like this isn't viewed as being of the same caliber as a starter. This means most players would not accept a role like this very willingly.

Still... it's an interesting idea.

I agree, it'd be pretty neat to see a player like this. Not sure that we will ever such a creature.

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I don't know his career numbers but Aurelio Rodriguez was one of my favs at 3rd.

Aurelio was an average talent overall who had one HOF level skill, his arm. So he was always fun to watch even if he wasn't contributing that much overall. I guess he must not have been able to throw a breaking ball otherwise he should have tried pitching.

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I remember going to a Tiger game when Aurelio was playing. He made an unbelievable play that night. Batter bounced one off the plate, looked almost like a pop up. He turned his back, short hopped it, and fired a bullet to first. Close but out. Incredible.

After the game we were sitting at a street light, and he pulled up beside us. I said to my buddy, that's Aurelio. The windows were down so I said "hell of a play tonight." He laughed and talked to us until the light changed. One of the coolest things ever.

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Aurelio was so good at moving to his right, backhanding the ball and firing a seed to 1st...shame he couldn't hit that same slider Nick seems to struggle with.

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Brandon Inge became a much more effective player than the majority -> vast majority of guys who made it to the show, all of whom are all phenomenal baseball players. Well maybe not Eddie Gaedel.

He quite possibly had the 2nd best career at 3rd base in a Tiger uniform (behind George Kell).

I didn't care for the Brandon Inge show in general and I found his popularity among the segment of his fans to be nauseating at times, but I would say was a really good player who exceeded expectations.

Yes, seen in the proper light, Inge had a really good career with the Tigers.

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Rodriguez and Brinkman certainly covered the left side quite well.

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I keep wondering why they can't get Bull Durham to join the MLB club as the hitting coach. He seems to really help those who work with him. Then again, there are those who say that hitting coaches don't matter.

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How would any of us know whether a hitting coach is doing a good job? We don't even get to watch them in action. With the manager, at least we see all the decisions he makes right in front of us even if we don't necessarily have all the information he has. We have very little to go on in evaluating hitting coaches, so I don't even bother trying.

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How would any of us know whether a hitting coach is doing a good job? We don't even get to watch them in action. With the manager, at least we see all the decisions he makes right in front of us even if we don't necessarily have all the information he has. We have very little to go on in evaluating hitting coaches, so I don't even bother trying.

I seem to recall that Kevin Long had all manner of good PR and he was supposed to fix Curtis Granderson. I'm not sure you can fix some things. Still, for whatever reason Bull Durham has good PR and it does make me wonder what his reasoning is for not going to the MLB club. Has anyone got a handle on that?

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How would any of us know whether a hitting coach is doing a good job? We don't even get to watch them in action. With the manager, at least we see all the decisions he makes right in front of us even if we don't necessarily have all the information he has. We have very little to go on in evaluating hitting coaches, so I don't even bother trying.

I would guess that it's a pretty complex analysis to resolve because even if a coach clearly helps one guy improve, the method that helped that player maybe be of no value or at worst counterproductive for the next. There are so many ways to fail at hitting as well as so many different ways to succeed. From the sound of it it's mostly video work for slump busting in today's game - look at what you look like when you were going good and try to figure what you are doing different. Trying to actually remake hitters with big revisions of approach a la Charlie Lau seems to have been pretty much abandoned at the ML level, though just as a counter example the Tigers claim to more or less be doing exactly that with Gose, or you could interpret it as Toronto having done that and the Tigers just letting him go back to hitting in his more natural style.

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I agree, it'd be pretty neat to see a player like this. Not sure that we will ever such a creature.

2000 Shane Halter was another time that it could have worked out that way. He played every position that year.(And no, not just because of that one game... he played at least one game in every position except pitcher prior to that.)

His offense was a semi-respectable .668 for a utility guy and he was in 105 games.

Interesting side note, Halter was a favorite of mine because of his versatility. I just really started following the Tigers closely again in 2000 after not following baseball for much of the 90s so he was a guy I really liked. Of course his infamous: "I used to be the Tigers' Shortstop" line soured me on him.

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And of course, Chone Figgins was probably the most like this sort of guy we'll ever see.

In 2004, 2005, and 2006 he played every defensive positions except for 1B (which he surely could have) and catcher (which he probably couldn't have). He had an OPS of .770, .749, and .712 in those years.

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I keep wondering why they can't get Bull Durham to join the MLB club as the hitting coach. He seems to really help those who work with him. Then again, there are those who say that hitting coaches don't matter.

Just a theory, but I wonder if the problem is that the team (rightly or wrongly) feels that Major League hitters won't listen to instruction as much as minor league hitters will. If this is true, you want your best teachers in the lower levels as this will be when they are most effective at teaching.

Either that or maybe Durham isn't interested in moving? Honestly I don't know cause I've wondered the same thing myself in the past.

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How would any of us know whether a hitting coach is doing a good job? We don't even get to watch them in action. With the manager, at least we see all the decisions he makes right in front of us even if we don't necessarily have all the information he has. We have very little to go on in evaluating hitting coaches, so I don't even bother trying.

There's truth here and I don't claim to be any great baseball guru. I guess I just look at the finished product and if it's continuously bad... that sorta naturally leads a person to look at the head of that area. It reminds me a bit of the Joey Harrington era of the Lions. I remember that it seemed like no matter who they brought in as a receiver, that group of guys would have a high number of dropped passes. After a dozen different receivers all developed the "dropsies" when Harrington was throwing to them, at some point you look at Harrington and wonder if he's just now throwing a catchable ball.

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There's truth here and I don't claim to be any great baseball guru. I guess I just look at the finished product and if it's continuously bad... that sorta naturally leads a person to look at the head of that area. It reminds me a bit of the Joey Harrington era of the Lions. I remember that it seemed like no matter who they brought in as a receiver, that group of guys would have a high number of dropped passes. After a dozen different receivers all developed the "dropsies" when Harrington was throwing to them, at some point you look at Harrington and wonder if he's just now throwing a catchable ball.

Long term, maybe you can something. In this case, the Tigers have done pretty well during his tenure. They have scored 4.54 runs per game over the past calendar year which is best in the majors.

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Long term, maybe you can something. In this case, the Tigers have done pretty well during his tenure. They have scored 4.54 runs per game over the past calendar year which is best in the majors.

Where's my 6 runs?

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I think he will be fine eventually, but he still isn't able to lay off low breaking pitches that are nowhere near the strike zone. This is a pitch recognition skill he needs to hone more in Toledo, probably all this season. Find an at least average third baseman somewhere to trade for short term that doesn't require a big loss in talent. It really wouldn't take much to upgrade the position the way Nick is playing, and a wake up call to Nick might not be a bad thing.

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Excellent article. I'm glad his improvement in fielding is being recognized. Now, they just need to fix one of the worst hitters in baseball.

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