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study: 1 in 25 death cases likely innocent

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Science and law have led to the exoneration of hundreds of criminal defendants in recent decades, but big questions remain: How many other innocent defendants are locked up? How many are wrongly executed?

About one in 25 people imprisoned under a death sentence is likely innocent, according to a new statistical study appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And that means it is all but certain that at least several of the 1,320 defendants executed since 1977 were innocent, the study says.

From 1973 to 2004, 1.6 percent of those sentenced to death in the U.S. — 138 prisoners — were exonerated and released because of innocence.

But the great majority of innocent people who are sentenced to death are never identified and freed, says professor Samuel Gross of the University of Michigan Law School, the study's lead author.

Study: 1 in 25 death cases likely innocent

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Studies Say Death Penalty Deters Crime says that the death penalty is a deterrent.

and this says it isn't

No credible evidence on whether death penalty deters, experts say - The Denver Post

I think this would be a good use of big data analytics as well.

or maybe some common sense, real world experience?

Randy Workman saw intimate details of the death penalty that are kept from the public eye in the United States. As the warden of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester he handpicked secret executioners, walked people to their deaths and saw the process of obtaining lethal injection drugs. He participated in 32 executions during various jobs in more than two decades working for the corrections department before retiring in 2012.

. . .

Based on those experiences, Workman said he has come to believe that the threat of execution does not prevent people from committing murder.

“I can tell you the people that I’ve executed, when they committed crimes, they didn’t, wasn’t thinking about the death penalty and a lot of them were high, or a lot of them in the generation of people we’re dealing with today don’t have a lot of forethought about the end result,” he said.

Oklahoma former prison warden: death penalty does not help families | World news | theguardian.com

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One of the things you hear in criminology classes.... pickpockets pickpocketed people who were at a public execution of a pick pocketer.

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whilst reading up on the Manson family murders of Tate/Labianca today...came away wondering how much better off the World was that that group was still around.

I know criminals don't think like nation states. Rational Actor Model doesn't necessarily apply. The same can be said of nation states sometimes too. Sometimes Adolph really doesn't care that you've been nice to him.

The same sick mind that can kill will be less than impressed by the death penalty. That said, the purging of the herd of those curr dogs has a value.

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The same sick mind that can kill will be less than impressed by the death penalty. That said, the purging of the herd of those curr dogs has a value.

Yes, that's a basic feature of criminal corrections - incapacitation from committing more crimes. It happens w/ prison all the time, don't need death penalty to do it.

Or is the value you're speaking of something else?

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Yes, that's a basic feature of criminal corrections - incapacitation from committing more crimes. It happens w/ prison all the time, don't need death penalty to do it.

Well, if there is a group of non-criminals I wouldn't want my daughter to marry...at the top of that list would be prison guards. So, more prisons and more warehoused inmates create more prison guards.

As for the deterrent, I do think the execution of deserters in wartime has a powerful focusing effect on the mind.

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Well, if there is a group of non-criminals I wouldn't want my daughter to marry...at the top of that list would be prison guards. So, more prisons and more warehoused inmates create more prison guards.

As for the deterrent, I do think the execution of deserters in wartime has a powerful focusing effect on the mind.

death row is an inmate warehouse as well

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whilst reading up on the Manson family murders of Tate/Labianca today...came away wondering how much better off the World was that that group was still around.

I know criminals don't think like nation states. Rational Actor Model doesn't necessarily apply. The same can be said of nation states sometimes too. Sometimes Adolph really doesn't care that you've been nice to him.

The same sick mind that can kill will be less than impressed by the death penalty. That said, the purging of the herd of those curr dogs has a value.

besides their celebrity status (thank you media, and public fascination with depravity) i don't see how the manson family being alive in prison makes or breaks anyone's day. "purging" them sounds like something charlie would say.

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besides their celebrity status (thank you media, and public fascination with depravity) i don't see how the manson family being alive in prison makes or breaks anyone's day. "purging" them sounds like something charlie would say.

Or POTUS

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I'm still shaking my head over the "botched execution" headlines. The guy died. That was the purpose of executing him, it doesn't seem they botched it to me, he died as planned. Granted it might not have been neat and tidy but I feel absolutely zero sympathy for the guy.

He shot a 17 year girl and laughed as they buried her while she was still alive. He got to live for 15 more years AFTER killing her. I'm supposed to suddenly feel sorry for him because he might have felt some pain for 40 damned minutes? He deserved every bit of the pain and lot more.

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No, you're supposed to feel sorry for our nation, not him.

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I'm still shaking my head over the "botched execution" headlines. The guy died. That was the purpose of executing him, it doesn't seem they botched it to me, he died as planned. Granted it might not have been neat and tidy but I feel absolutely zero sympathy for the guy.

He shot a 17 year girl and laughed as they buried her while she was still alive. He got to live for 15 more years AFTER killing her. I'm supposed to suddenly feel sorry for him because he might have felt some pain for 40 damned minutes? He deserved every bit of the pain and lot more.

concur

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I'm still shaking my head over the "botched execution" headlines. The guy died. That was the purpose of executing him, it doesn't seem they botched it to me, he died as planned. Granted it might not have been neat and tidy but I feel absolutely zero sympathy for the guy.

He shot a 17 year girl and laughed as they buried her while she was still alive. He got to live for 15 more years AFTER killing her. I'm supposed to suddenly feel sorry for him because he might have felt some pain for 40 damned minutes? He deserved every bit of the pain and lot more.

concur

Its good to see that the local conservatives don't seem to care about the constitution when we aren't talking about their rights to carry their steel penises around.

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Its good to see that the local conservatives don't seem to care about the constitution when we aren't talking about their rights to carry their steel penises around.

Its great is what it is.

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I would think anyone desiring him to suffer would want him in prison his whole life with no chance of parole.

Dying is the easy way out.

This is why the death penalty doesn't deter crime. Any criminal calm enough think about the possible consequences of his actions would probably claim he fears life no parole as the worse outcome. I think it has been more than adequately shown that what deters rational crime is certainty of punishment. What deters crimes of passion - in which class most murders fall into - is much less clear.

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besides their celebrity status (thank you media, and public fascination with depravity) i don't see how the manson family being alive in prison makes or breaks anyone's day. "purging" them sounds like something charlie would say.

I don't think that Sharon Tate's family would agree with you. Her sister has attended every parole hearing. I think a couple of other victims' families have as well.

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Its great is what it is.

I know right, **** the 8th amendment. Guns, Jesus and monster trucks for me!

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I know right, **** the 8th amendment. Guns, Jesus and monster trucks for me!

Monster trucks are definitely part of the Holy Trinity: all death penalty advocates know that. WWF and WWE as well.

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Monster trucks are definitely part of the Holy Trinity: all death penalty advocates know that. WWF and WWE as well.

Lol, I am glad to hear that wildlife is so important to you. I thought it was NASCAR and WWE. I learned something today. :cheeky:

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Lol, I am glad to hear that wildlife is so important to you. I thought it was NASCAR and WWE. I learned something today. :cheeky:

(I only cite WWF to show you how old school I am).

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(I only cite WWF to show you how old school I am).

Shut up, I still remember the WWF (wrastling) and I have a birthday coming up. I don't need to feel older. :)

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I know right, **** the 8th amendment. Guns, Jesus and monster trucks for me!

The difference is that I don't classify the death penalty as cruel and unusual punishment. Had the founders intended the death penalty to fall under that they could have specified it since people were being executed then too.

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The difference is that I don't classify the death penalty as cruel and unusual punishment. Had the founders intended the death penalty to fall under that they could have specified it since people were being executed then too.

One can not consider the death penalty as cruel and unusual and still delineate it from what happened to this guy. The think that it is path dependent, and not result dependent as you have suggested.

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