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New grass, baby!

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I'll leave it up to the professionals. Not a doubt in my mind that Heather and the team will have the field in prime condition for opening day.

If only I could say the same about the bullpen...

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I recall the spring we had a late two day freeze during spring training. I was photographing Porcello on the back fields as he tossed to Richard Zumaya. Richard missed a ball and it glanced off my ankle. I reached to to retrieve and toss back and realize the ball has a green tint. "dye on the grass?"

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Deep snow is actually a very good insulator for lawn grass roots, might not be as bad as one might imagine.

That would be cool except I don't believe there is currently any grass. Hence the problem. It isn't about melting snow. It's about getting turf on the ground and rooted in time before it starts dying.

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Obviously the grass will get in somehow, but Heather and crew need to start a plan NOW....

Hopefully someone forwards this message to her, otherwise she might forget all about the grass.

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http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/20140303/NEWS/140309952/nhl-red-wings-to-pay-for-replacement-tigers-field-at-comerica

The National Hockey League, along with the Detroit Red Wings and Olympia Entertainment, are splitting the cost of the new grass field that will be installed at Comerica Park in time for the Detroit Tigers season opener on March 31.

The cost and how it's being apportioned among the three entities hasn't been disclosed. Olympia is the entertainment management arm of the Ilitch family's business holdings, which include the Wings and Tigers.

New natural grass fields at major league ballparks range in price from $100,000 to $250,000, turf industry insiders say.

The contract for the 103,000 square feet of Kentucky bluegrass, which will be the first full-field replacement at the 15-year-old ballpark since 2007, was awarded to Fort Morgan, Colo.-based Graff's Turf Farm.

The NHL agreed to pick up costs at Comerica Park as part of the deal it swung with Red Wings and Tigers owner Mike Ilitch to host its Winter Classic at Michigan Stadium instead of Comerica Park.

At a cost of up to $1 million, the NHL paid Kitty Hawk, N.C.-based Rink Specialists Inc. to build a temporary ice rink on Comerica Park's infield for the Hockeytown Winter Festival games at the end of December.

The Winter Festival was the downtown Detroit portion of the Winter Classic, which was played at Michigan Stadium between the Red Wings and Toronto Maple Leafs.

For the Winter Festival, all of the Comerica Park grass was removed. A woven barrier was put over the bare dirt to protect it until the sod is installed — once the snow clears. The ice rink was removed last month.

The NHL agreed to assume some of the post-event costs at Comerica.

The Tigers haven't disclosed a timeline for the new turf to be put down.

Regardless of the snow, the grass was scheduled to be installed in March to give it a month to take root before the 2014 baseball season begins.

Opening Day is March 31, when the Kansas City Royals come to Detroit.

The Tigers haven't opened a season at home this early since 2008 — which also was against the Royals (and began a seven-game losing streak to start the season).

Comerica was scheduled for all new grass last year, but the NHL's labor troubles in 2012, and subsequent cancellation of the 2013 Winter Classic, pushed the project back a year.

Depending on the thickness of the custom turf, how much is needed and how quickly it's needed to use, the cost of a baseball field ranges from $100,000 to more than $250,000, James Graff, co-owner and president of Graff's Turf Farm, told Crain's in November. At the time, Graff was bidding on the Comerica Park job. A message was left for him today.

Artificial turf typically costs $500,000 to $1 million-plus to initially install.

Twenty-eight of MLB's 30 stadiums have natural grass playing fields. Only Tropicana Field in Tampa and Rogers Centre in Toronto use artificial turf.

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So their plan is to install it this week so that it has "a month" to root?

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I wonder if it's Heather and Co who do that or if it's part of the contract with this company in Colorado?

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1. BluegrassGood ole Bluegrass is by far the most popular turf in the Majors. Bluegrass is notable for it’s lovely, bright and shiny appearance, and for it malleability when it comes to making patterns and shapes in the field. Bluegrass is also more cushiony than other turfs, so players are at less risk of harming themselves when they take a dive. One negative aspect of Bluegrass is that it takes an extremely long time to take root, sometimes as long as a year. That why in March of 2000, the Detroit Tigers fired 3 employees for walking on the precious new bluegrass floor of Comerica Park.
.

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Maybe I'll drive down there at lunch today or tomorrow and see what's going on....

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Maybe I'll drive down there at lunch today or tomorrow and see what's going on....

While you're there find Heather and remind her we need grass to play baseball. All doubts that MTS has her back will vanish.

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So their plan is to install it this week so that it has "a month" to root?

Good luck with that, I still have three feet of snow in my yard with no end in sight. Other than a brief warmup on Friday we're below freezing for the next 10 days. If Heather Z can get this grass down and rooted in the next four weeks then she should be a lock to represent the AL in the all-star game as groundskeeper.

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Mother Nature, it would appear, is no match for the Detroit Tigers.

Despite an absolutely brutal winter in Metro Detroit, the ballclub insists it is on schedule to install Comerica Park’s new playing field — 103,000 square feet of Kentucky Bluegrass — in time for the season opener, March 31 against the Kansas City Royals.

“The field will be ready for Opening Day,” Ron Colangelo, Tigers vice president of communications, told The News on Wednesday.

Heather Nabozny, the Tigers head groundskeeper, has not been available for comment over the last week. But an independent turf expert concurred with Colangelo’s comment, and is calming any fears fans might have.

“It’s not like we’re talking about frozen soil like in lawns,” said David Gilstrap, senior turf specialist at Michigan State University. “It’s done all the time.

From The Detroit News: Despite brutal winter, Tigers insist: New field 'will be ready for Opening Day' | The Detroit News

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That seems reasonable. I never had any concern. It wouldn't make sense not to have all of this figured out before hand.

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Its not much to worry about. My office is across the street from Busch stadium and late September they tore up the entire outfield and replaced it the Monday before a Tuesday night game. They had to because of a college football game they had on Saturday tore up the field. St. Louis is always replacing the outfield surface. So in theory they could lay down the sod at any point before the home opener and still be able to play on it. (they have already replaced that surface they replaced in September after after Argentina and Bosnia-H played a soccer game there in Nov..)

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Well, I'm not sure what condition the field is in. Have they been removing snow from the playing area?

If not, that a lot of snow yet to melt, along with the water it causes. Either way, if it warms up too fast in the Detroit area, we could see record flooding.

And I'm hoping for at least a fifty degree day for baseball....and that sounds like a dream. :classic:

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That seems reasonable. I never had any concern. It wouldn't make sense not to have all of this figured out before hand.

You can't figure out what you don't know will happen. It's not as if a fortune teller told them when they ripped up the turf that the worst winter ever was coming. How do you "figure this out before hand" when you don't know it's coming?

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Despite what the team mouthpiece says, I'm still a little concerned. What if it's still continuously below-zero up until opening day, and possibly beyond? Don't you have to water grass to fertilize it?

They're waiting until the 17th, what if they get another snow storm around then? That isn't very far-fetched. I know it does no good to worry about but there are plenty of reasons to not be 100% convinced that there's nothing to worry about.

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