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2012 NBA Draft

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Wow...watching that Draft Xpress video on him when it gets to the "weaknesses" is painful. Hope Frank knows how to coach players at a junior high level cuz I think his offensive game may be around there.

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I don't agree that he was the best low post defender last year. He was probably the best shot blocker and he avoids fouls very well (which is hard to do as a shot blocker). But he was a terrible defensive rebounder and was generally bad in the games I saw (NCAA tourney plus the game against UC) when the ball wasn't near him.

Everyone talks about how important it is to have athleticism at the 5 but if he can't actually play who cares how athletic he is? He's a high risk/high reward pick and his floor is drastically lower than Deandre Jordan.

It wasn't my opinion that he was the best low post defender, it was a stat posted earlier in this thread. Honestly I'm not sure how the stat was calculated, but he graded out the best in college last season.

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He's at about 12.6 per 48 minutes (not good for a center that intends to get drafted). Note: the rest of these stats stolen directly from this article and are based on the draft express top 100 database:

For Andre Drummond and the Pistons, the numbers have to lie | Pistons by the Numbers

He was 42nd overall and 18 among centers and power forwards in total rebounds per 40 minutes. That's not good.

He was 41st overall and 30th among centers and power forwards. That's terrible.

Drummond basically skipped his senior year, where he was supposed to play at a prep school, and he played at UConn instead. He is still very much developing in all facets of his game, and Calhoun being sick last year couldn't have helped.

Once again, Monroe averaged over a full rebound less per game as a frosh than Drummond did last season and Monroe averaged a respectable 9.7 rebound for us last season after improving on a 7.5 effort the year before.

To put it in ever better perspective, Patrick Ewing averaged 7.5 REB as a frosh at G'Town and Ewing is one of the top 25 leading NBA rebounders of all-time. Was he ever the best rebounder in the league? No, there were even times he wasn't the best rebounder on his own team. But he did improve over time, and I think Drummond will as well.

Drummond and Ewing both possessed more talent than they did skill at 18/19, and Drummond will have the benefit of playing with a great 4 while he is still learning how to play. If he is lucky, he may even get to absorb some of Wallace's big man wisdom this year.

This pick was one the Pistons had to make. There are always going to be Henson-types in the draft, but 7' 280 pound centers with 40" verts only come around every so often.

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I would say the same thing about the Knight pick...although I think next year will be the real tell tale sign of how good of a pick that was.

So far I think Knight has been exactly what anyone should have expected. He scores points but isn't super efficient about it and he turns the ball over to much. And he doesn't do anything else well enough to make up for the turnovers. If he cuts the turnovers he'll be fine and if he doesn't he's going to be overrated because of his scoring and a drag to the team overall.

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It wasn't my opinion that he was the best low post defender, it was a stat posted earlier in this thread. Honestly I'm not sure how the stat was calculated, but he graded out the best in college last season.

I heard the same. It's from an ESPN stats tweet. "Of the 125 players who defended at least 75 post-up plays this season, Andre Drummond allowed the fewest points per possession."

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Drummond basically skipped his senior year, where he was supposed to play at a prep school, and he played at UConn instead. He is still very much developing in all facets of his game, and Calhoun being sick last year couldn't have helped.

Once again, Monroe averaged over a full rebound less per game as a frosh than Drummond did last season and Monroe averaged a respectable 9.7 rebound for us last season after improving on a 7.5 effort the year before.

To put it in ever better perspective, Patrick Ewing averaged 7.5 REB as a frosh at G'Town and Ewing is one of the top 25 leading NBA rebounders of all-time. Was he ever the best rebounder in the league? No, there were even times he wasn't the best rebounder on his own team. But he did improve over time, and I think Drummond will as well.

Drummond and Ewing both possessed more talent than they did skill at 18/19, and Drummond will have the benefit of playing with a great 4 while he is still learning how to play. If he is lucky, he may even get to absorb some of Wallace's big man wisdom this year.

This pick was one the Pistons had to make. There are always going to be Henson-types in the draft, but 7' 280 pound centers with 40" verts only come around every so often.

Drummond spent 4 years in high school, he didn't skip his senior year he passed on spending a 5th year in high school. He's been playing basketball roughly as long as every other freshmen in the draft (though he is a bit younger as he's got an August birthday and it doesn't look like he was "redshirted" for kindergarden or first grade).

I'm not sure you can compare Ewing's time at Georgetown and college basketball today. Few freshmen even started at a high level in college in the early 80's and now very few highly talented players stay in school for multiple years at this point. Ewing stayed in school for 4 years. Would he have been a lottery pick if he had been in the draft as a freshmen?

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I heard the same. It's from an ESPN stats tweet. "Of the 125 players who defended at least 75 post-up plays this season, Andre Drummond allowed the fewest points per possession."

IC, that makes sense. Not what I'd interpret as "best low post defender" as I think of that meaning best defender that plays in the low post. But considering how many blocks the guy gets I'm not surprised he gave up few points on post plays.

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Wow...watching that Draft Xpress video on him when it gets to the "weaknesses" is painful. Hope Frank knows how to coach players at a junior high level cuz I think his offensive game may be around there.

I thought I caught them saying his free throw percentage being in the 20s or something crazy like that.

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Good interview with Drummond after being drafted. I really like his answer when asked about who he would like to emulate and why.

Drummond one on one

Thanks for sharing, really liked what he had to say.

I am excited for some pistons hoops this year.

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If it were that easy to teach everyone would do it. Guys that don't rebound in college don't typically learn to rebound in the NBA.

I highly doubt that statement is true for one year guys who are as young as Drummond. Plus Drummond was a stud on the offensive boards, he just struggled to defensive rebounds. There are a lot of tough, savvy veterans who know how to rebound the basketball in the Big East. He's still learning, but he's fine.

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I can't believe there is anyone not excited about Drummond to be quite honest. Sure, he has bust potential, sure he has things to work on, but you don't get a guy with a ceiling of Dwight Howard at #9 very often. You don't get the 2nd most talented player in the draft at 9 very often. Not to mention it fills a huge need at a positon of scarcity throughout the league.

Did someone really suggest Henson would have been a better pick? Man, I cannot fathom such a statement to be honest. Henson would have been an okay consolation pick depending how things went, but his ceiling is 3rd big man. Drummond's is superstar starting C.

Like its been said, he's raw, but he's young and not quite as raw as some have suggested. He defended post up opportunities well and also blocked a lot of shots. He was a very good offensive rebounder, he runs the floor and can finish at the rim. The UConn guards sucked at getting him the ball as well, that is pretty widely accepted by those that watch UConn.

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Drummond spent 4 years in high school, he didn't skip his senior year he passed on spending a 5th year in high school. He's been playing basketball roughly as long as every other freshmen in the draft (though he is a bit younger as he's got an August birthday and it doesn't look like he was "redshirted" for kindergarden or first grade).

I'm not sure you can compare Ewing's time at Georgetown and college basketball today. Few freshmen even started at a high level in college in the early 80's and now very few highly talented players stay in school for multiple years at this point. Ewing stayed in school for 4 years. Would he have been a lottery pick if he had been in the draft as a freshmen?

Comparing Ewing as a frosh and Drummond as a frosh is fair, IMO. For a true center, not that much has changed. The roles/expectations of the pg and pf have changed, but a true center needs the same basic skills he needed in 1981. And just by the way, a really good center prospect will almost always start as a frosh and please feel free to look it up.

Few bigs can come right out as a teen and play great, those that do are potential HOFers most likely. Ewing was a raw shot blocker without much rebounding isntict as a teen, but Thompson taught him how to play. It isn't beyond the realm of reason to think that between our staff, Monroe and Wallace that Drummond can be taught as well.

This was obviously a kid who could have benefitted from a prep year under a coach who was good with big men, but there is always a market for a kid like this in the NBA. I'm just glad he's on our side, and that we have a shot blocker to plug in next to Monroe.

And yes, Ewing would have been a lottery pick if he would have come out after his freshman year probably in the top three with James Worthy and Terry Comings, but before 'Nique and LaSalle Thompson. Ewing was a legend by the time he hit the G'town campus and he was probably the most highly-recruited player since Alcindor at that time. There is a solid chance he could have even been the #1 overall, as the Lakers could have picked him and traded him to #2 LAC or #3 Utah. To be sure, nobody questioned whether he would eventually be a better player than LaSalle Thomson--it was just a given. Thompson was a solid big, a grinder. Ewing was born to be a franchise center.

Drummond comes to us with considerably less fanfare, and with considerably less pressure on him even when comparing the two at the same age. Drummond does have all the necessary gifts to be a 14/10/3 (pts/reb/blk) center if he even hits his median potential. This year we should expect something like 8/7/2 with a ceiling of 10/9/3 his rookie campaign.

The kid has a lot to learn, but he's going into a really good situation here in Detroit. I think Macklin, at the ripe age of 26 when the season starts, could be a very important piece to us this year as Drummond continues to learn. The two give us long, wide bodies to put in the middle next to Monroe/Jerebko.

Henson's upside was, what, MAYBE Theo Ratliff? I like Theo as much as anyone, but Henson is going to get pushed all over the paint for a few years--he needs to get Kevin Willis' phone number in a bad way.

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I can't believe there is anyone not excited about Drummond to be quite honest. Sure, he has bust potential, sure he has things to work on, but you don't get a guy with a ceiling of Dwight Howard at #9 very often. You don't get the 2nd most talented player in the draft at 9 very often. Not to mention it fills a huge need at a positon of scarcity throughout the league.

Did someone really suggest Henson would have been a better pick? Man, I cannot fathom such a statement to be honest. Henson would have been an okay consolation pick depending how things went, but his ceiling is 3rd big man. Drummond's is superstar starting C.

Like its been said, he's raw, but he's young and not quite as raw as some have suggested. He defended post up opportunities well and also blocked a lot of shots. He was a very good offensive rebounder, he runs the floor and can finish at the rim. The UConn guards sucked at getting him the ball as well, that is pretty widely accepted by those that watch UConn.

Henson's ceiling is not as high as Drummond but it's higher than "3rd big man." Not sure he's the guy I'd prefer over Drummond but come on, he develops a mid range game and his ceiling is Greg Monroe. Neither guy would excite me a ton though.

Ceilings aren't everything and it's important for NBA franchises to fill holes with cheap players that play well and a players rookie contract is the best place to extract value from a role player. Even if he develops Drummond is unlikely to be a star player until the end of his rookie contract. And I'd argue his chances of developing just aren't that good (certainly not so good that his "floor" is that of an already extremely productive NBA center like DeAndre Jordan).

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He's at about 12.6 per 48 minutes (not good for a center that intends to get drafted). Note: the rest of these stats stolen directly from this article and are based on the draft express top 100 database:

For Andre Drummond and the Pistons, the numbers have to lie | Pistons by the Numbers

He was 42nd overall and 18 among centers and power forwards in total rebounds per 40 minutes. That's not good.

He was 41st overall and 30th among centers and power forwards. That's terrible.

Everyone ahead of Drummond in rebounding appears to be older, often playing significantly lesser competition. Aside from Sullinger they were all inferior to Drummond as freshmen.

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Ceilings aren't everything and it's important for NBA franchises to fill holes with cheap players that play well and a players rookie contract is the best place to extract value from a role player. Even if he develops Drummond is unlikely to be a star player until the end of his rookie contract. And I'd argue his chances of developing just aren't that good (certainly not so good that his "floor" is that of an already extremely productive NBA center like DeAndre Jordan).

I definitely agree that ceilings aren't everything, and that good franchises get good players to step in and be role players. We aren't a good franchise yet, though, and we are rebuilding our brand. Taking a chance on a guy like Drummond is exactly what we needed to do--if you look at the conference, how many elite bigs are there? How many of them are under 25? Under 30?

You can build footwork, rebounding strategy and a post game if the kid has athletic ability. You can't teach height, wing-span and shot-blocking talent.

Drummond doesn't have to be a star for us to improve a lot, he just has to be league average to above-average. Fringe all-star would be fantastic!

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Comparing Ewing as a frosh and Drummond as a frosh is fair, IMO. For a true center, not that much has changed. The roles/expectations of the pg and pf have changed, but a true center needs the same basic skills he needed in 1981. And just by the way, a really good center prospect will almost always start as a frosh and please feel free to look it up.

Few bigs can come right out as a teen and play great, those that do are potential HOFers most likely. Ewing was a raw shot blocker without much rebounding isntict as a teen, but Thompson taught him how to play. It isn't beyond the realm of reason to think that between our staff, Monroe and Wallace that Drummond can be taught as well.

This was obviously a kid who could have benefitted from a prep year under a coach who was good with big men, but there is always a market for a kid like this in the NBA. I'm just glad he's on our side, and that we have a shot blocker to plug in next to Monroe.

And yes, Ewing would have been a lottery pick if he would have come out after his freshman year probably in the top three with James Worthy and Terry Comings, but before 'Nique and LaSalle Thompson. Ewing was a legend by the time he hit the G'town campus and he was probably the most highly-recruited player since Alcindor at that time. There is a solid chance he could have even been the #1 overall, as the Lakers could have picked him and traded him to #2 LAC or #3 Utah. To be sure, nobody questioned whether he would eventually be a better player than LaSalle Thomson--it was just a given. Thompson was a solid big, a grinder. Ewing was born to be a franchise center.

Drummond comes to us with considerably less fanfare, and with considerably less pressure on him even when comparing the two at the same age. Drummond does have all the necessary gifts to be a 14/10/3 (pts/reb/blk) center if he even hits his median potential. This year we should expect something like 8/7/2 with a ceiling of 10/9/3 his rookie campaign.

The kid has a lot to learn, but he's going into a really good situation here in Detroit. I think Macklin, at the ripe age of 26 when the season starts, could be a very important piece to us this year as Drummond continues to learn. The two give us long, wide bodies to put in the middle next to Monroe/Jerebko.

Henson's upside was, what, MAYBE Theo Ratliff? I like Theo as much as anyone, but Henson is going to get pushed all over the paint for a few years--he needs to get Kevin Willis' phone number in a bad way.

Yes, Drummond could have used a prep year. That doesn't mean he skipped a year of high school, it means he could have used an extra year of high school, big difference there.

My point is, a guy like Ewing stayed for four years in college. He was competing against other guys that were highly talent that stayed for four years. Which 4th year player (or 3rd year player) in college basketball last year was comparable to the guys Ewing was playing against in the Big East? The competitive environment of college basketball was completely different in the early to mid 80's. Yes, elite centers started then but few non-elite freshmen played and saw the kinds of minutes they see now (and please feel free to look it up). The point isn't that Ewing wasn't any good (not sure he'd have been as highly drafted as you suggest, but he was highly sought after pretty early in his college career so maybe. Still high school players at the time were much less likely to consider going pro), it's that Ewing was playing against much more experienced and talented competition relative to Drummond.

If Drummond can average 8 points a game next year I'll be very happy and very surprised. It's worth noting that he barely averaged those points and rebounds numbers in college (10.4/7.6/2.7 were his college averages).

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I definitely agree that ceilings aren't everything, and that good franchises get good players to step in and be role players. We aren't a good franchise yet, though, and we are rebuilding our brand. Taking a chance on a guy like Drummond is exactly what we needed to do--if you look at the conference, how many elite bigs are there? How many of them are under 25? Under 30?

You can build footwork, rebounding strategy and a post game if the kid has athletic ability. You can't teach height, wing-span and shot-blocking talent.

Drummond doesn't have to be a star for us to improve a lot, he just has to be league average to above-average. Fringe all-star would be fantastic!

If we only need league average Henson was the correct pick (if it's him or Drummond). Drummond is the pick if we have to have someone to be a star, IMO.

I think teaching those things is quite a bit harder than you suggest (and no more difficult that teaching shot blocking). Height, wing span and leaping ability can't be taught but they also only have value if combined with the things that have to be taught and aren't easy to teach.

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I think Macklin, at the ripe age of 26 when the season starts, could be a very important piece to us this year as Drummond continues to learn. The two give us long, wide bodies to put in the middle next to Monroe/Jerebko.

Macklin did not get an offer from us. He'll report to summer league but is an unrestricted free agent.

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Yes, Drummond could have used a prep year. That doesn't mean he skipped a year of high school, it means he could have used an extra year of high school, big difference there.

My point is, a guy like Ewing stayed for four years in college. He was competing against other guys that were highly talent that stayed for four years. Which 4th year player (or 3rd year player) in college basketball last year was comparable to the guys Ewing was playing against in the Big East? The competitive environment of college basketball was completely different in the early to mid 80's. Yes, elite centers started then but few non-elite freshmen played and saw the kinds of minutes they see now (and please feel free to look it up). The point isn't that Ewing wasn't any good (not sure he'd have been as highly drafted as you suggest, but he was highly sought after pretty early in his college career so maybe. Still high school players at the time were much less likely to consider going pro), it's that Ewing was playing against much more experienced and talented competition relative to Drummond.

If Drummond can average 8 points a game next year I'll be very happy and very surprised. It's worth noting that he barely averaged those points and rebounds numbers in college (10.4/7.6/2.7 were his college averages).

Sure college isn't filled with great junior and senior bigs, but it wasn't like Ewing played against Sampson, Perkins and Olajuwon every game, either. Fact is, elite centers just don't come around these days. Years ago, a guy like Durant . . .well, that was Akeem Olajuwon (pre-H). Olajuwon, by his prime, had all the skills to play SF but he played C because it was both expected and that was where he helped the team most. Teams are designed differently now, and guys like Durant all want to be wings and shoot from 25 ft out. If Durant wanted to, he would be the best center in the game. Argue all you want, it is just how I see it.

Center is now the basketball equivollent of playing offensive line. It is thankless dirty work and you are expected to live off the scraps the wings or shooting pg's don't want. Who's the best C in the league right now? Howard, and it isn't really close. Take a look at this:

Howard, Bynum and Chandler were voted 1-3rd team all-nba centers this season.

How does that stack up from a decade ago where you would see Shaq, J. O'Neal, B. Wallace, Mutombo. Go back another five, and you'll see Zo, Olajuwon, and The Admrial added to that. I remember when to pick the all-nba centers, you had to choose from: Ewing, Shaq, Zo, Mutombo, Robinson, and Olajuwon. Put all of them in their primes and Howard is better than only Deke IMO. A guy like Kevin Duckworth is probably equal to Bynum today, and Duckworth was fortunate to make the two AS teams he was on. And Chandler? I can't think of any point in time over the 80's or 90's where he would have made any All-NBA team.

The very top big man talent does not play center anymore. Starting with maybe Kemp, then Webber and Sheed and continuing with the likes of Garnett, Nowitzki and Duncan, this breed of bigs refused to just play the pivot. Since they've come into their prime, you've just seen Howard emerge as an elite center. Calling the likes of Chandler and Bynum elite makes me want to vomit--both are highly-flawed centers, and would be average stacked up about 15 years ago.

Drummond is a major get these days. He's not a big that wants to be a wing, he doesn't want to jack up threes--he's a center. That is exactly what we needed, a big that can do some dirty work.

Ewing was obviously a much better player than Drummond on every level, but that is reflective of the state of today's game. Basketball, from the point of being a big, isn't what it was in Ewing's day, The Admiral's day or Shaq's day. If it is true that Drummond wasn't playing against the kind of talent Ewing was, then it is also true for Anthony Davis.

My Ewing comparison was to show that it takes more than just a freshman season to make a big man in most every case save a HOF player, which exceptions like Garnett and Howard certainly are. If we can hope he ends up as productive as Bynum, maybe that's a better comparison.

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Macklin did not get an offer from us. He'll report to summer league but is an unrestricted free agent.

I'm sure they are waiting to for the roster to settle in. It is quite possible that Big Ben takes the role of mentor and Macklin is the odd man out. We'll see. I'm hoping I can get a press pass to get in to see some summer league.

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If we only need league average Henson was the correct pick (if it's him or Drummond). Drummond is the pick if we have to have someone to be a star, IMO.

I think teaching those things is quite a bit harder than you suggest (and no more difficult that teaching shot blocking). Height, wing span and leaping ability can't be taught but they also only have value if combined with the things that have to be taught and aren't easy to teach.

Henson is as unproven as Drummond, and isn't any more of a garauntee.

Feel free to show me examples of players who have been taught shot blocking. It is probably close to 100% than all of the even above-average shot blockers, statistically, had above-average shot-blocking numbers in college (if they played) and high school.

It is similar to distributing the ball in some ways, either you have the gift or you don't to a large extent. There are examples, like Wilt Chamberlain leading the NBA in assists one year, where traditional non-distributors do break out for big numbers, though. You can usually attach this to that player attracting overt defensive attention and finding his wide-open teammate who has benefitted from said scorer being double-teamed.

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Henson is as unproven as Drummond, and isn't any more of a garauntee.

Feel free to show me examples of players who have been taught shot blocking. It is probably close to 100% than all of the even above-average shot blockers, statistically, had above-average shot-blocking numbers in college (if they played) and high school.

It is similar to distributing the ball in some ways, either you have the gift or you don't to a large extent. There are examples, like Wilt Chamberlain leading the NBA in assists one year, where traditional non-distributors do break out for big numbers, though. You can usually attach this to that player attracting overt defensive attention and finding his wide-open teammate who has benefitted from said scorer being double-teamed.

I didn't realize you were asking for a guarantee. I certain I never made any kind of guarantee. Henson is more likely to be league average (not a guarantee) and more likely to get there sooner than Drummond. Drummond is a major project with a ton of potential. I don't think that is a particularly controversial statement nor do I think it is controversial to state that Henson was a better basketball player last year than Drummond was.

It is also close to 100% that above average NBA rebounders had above average rebounding numbers in college and high school (assuming they played). I guess this depends on what you mean by average and such, but even Drummond, who has terrible rebounding numbers for an NBA lottery pick at center, had above average rebounding numbers compared to the rest of college basketball. Feel free to bring up counter examples. That doesn't imply that rebounding is the same as height or wing span though. You actually can't teach those things. You can teach rebounding and passing and shot blocking, it's just very hard to do (because things like height and wing span help shot blockers and rebounders).

Put it another way, most guys that are 7' 270 lbs and can jump a mile in the air (or whatever Drummond's vertical is) don't need to be taught how to rebound, because when you are 7' 270 lbs rebounding is much, much easier and you've been doing it your entire basketball career.

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Sure college isn't filled with great junior and senior bigs, but it wasn't like Ewing played against Sampson, Perkins and Olajuwon every game, either. Fact is, elite centers just don't come around these days. Years ago, a guy like Durant . . .well, that was Akeem Olajuwon (pre-H). Olajuwon, by his prime, had all the skills to play SF but he played C because it was both expected and that was where he helped the team most. Teams are designed differently now, and guys like Durant all want to be wings and shoot from 25 ft out. If Durant wanted to, he would be the best center in the game. Argue all you want, it is just how I see it.

Center is now the basketball equivollent of playing offensive line. It is thankless dirty work and you are expected to live off the scraps the wings or shooting pg's don't want. Who's the best C in the league right now? Howard, and it isn't really close. Take a look at this:

Howard, Bynum and Chandler were voted 1-3rd team all-nba centers this season.

How does that stack up from a decade ago where you would see Shaq, J. O'Neal, B. Wallace, Mutombo. Go back another five, and you'll see Zo, Olajuwon, and The Admrial added to that. I remember when to pick the all-nba centers, you had to choose from: Ewing, Shaq, Zo, Mutombo, Robinson, and Olajuwon. Put all of them in their primes and Howard is better than only Deke IMO. A guy like Kevin Duckworth is probably equal to Bynum today, and Duckworth was fortunate to make the two AS teams he was on. And Chandler? I can't think of any point in time over the 80's or 90's where he would have made any All-NBA team.

The very top big man talent does not play center anymore. Starting with maybe Kemp, then Webber and Sheed and continuing with the likes of Garnett, Nowitzki and Duncan, this breed of bigs refused to just play the pivot. Since they've come into their prime, you've just seen Howard emerge as an elite center. Calling the likes of Chandler and Bynum elite makes me want to vomit--both are highly-flawed centers, and would be average stacked up about 15 years ago.

Drummond is a major get these days. He's not a big that wants to be a wing, he doesn't want to jack up threes--he's a center. That is exactly what we needed, a big that can do some dirty work.

Ewing was obviously a much better player than Drummond on every level, but that is reflective of the state of today's game. Basketball, from the point of being a big, isn't what it was in Ewing's day, The Admiral's day or Shaq's day. If it is true that Drummond wasn't playing against the kind of talent Ewing was, then it is also true for Anthony Davis.

My Ewing comparison was to show that it takes more than just a freshman season to make a big man in most every case save a HOF player, which exceptions like Garnett and Howard certainly are. If we can hope he ends up as productive as Bynum, maybe that's a better comparison.

I'm not really clear on what your point is here. On one hand, I claimed that comparing Ewings rebounds to Drummonds wasn't a good comparison because the competition was vastly different. You seem to agree with that and you agree that Ewing was better on every level. So do we agree that Ewing was a better rebounder at a similar stage of development as Drummond but played in a different era so the stats aren't necessarily reflective of that?

The Anthony Davis comparison is weird though. I never compared Davis' stats to Ewing's and why would I. I can compare them to Drummond since they played against a similar level of competition. Drummond's numbers don't look good compared to players right now. I don't think comparing college stats to college stats from 1983 is valid given the difference in the way the game has changed at that level.

If so I don't really disagree with anything else you've said about the state of basketball. Basketball has changed dramatically since then. There are more guys with height that can play wing positions than in the past and there is less emphasis on having athletes play center (partly because it's a waste of their talents. Sure, maybe Durant could be the best center in the league but he's already at that level at the 3 (ok Lebron is better, but Lebron could probably be a better center as well). But Drummond isn't a center because he wants to be a grinder (and neither is Howard). He's a center because he's not capable of anything else. He's an exceptional athlete for a center, but he doesn't have the handle or the shot (hell he can't even make 30% of his free throws right now) to play any wing position or even the PF position offensively. And defensively he's good at defending players in the post and being a help defender but he isn't good enough to be a one on one defender with even a good wing in the NBA.

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Quite honestly, I expect Drummond to look as lost as Darko his first year. The key will be for the Pistons to keep giving him playing time instead of letting him ride the pine because he is not ready. I don't know if Darko would have panned out had the Pistons handled him different but we didn't do him any favors. I don't really see the same issues occurring with Drummond because we are in rebuilding mode now but I thought it was worth mentioning because it is so important he plays 15-20 minutes a game next year.

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