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City of Detroit and Tiger Stadium Plans

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Is there a line of investors out the door clamoring for this property? If not, in the interim, why not put it to use as a baseball field?

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Detroit Rejects Tiger Stadium Field Fix-Up Offer « CBS Detroit

The city is trying to create some major redevelopment project on this site.

You've heard of the perfect being the enemy of the good? This is the 'you are so unlikely to ever get the perfect anytime in your present lifetime that to even still consider it perfect you must be surpassingly ignorant" being the enemy of the good.

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You've heard of the perfect being the enemy of the good? This is the 'you are so unlikely to ever get the perfect anytime in your present lifetime that to even still consider it perfect you must be surpassingly ignorant" being the enemy of the good.

I was thinking of this while I posted this earlier but got interrupted and hit send. From listening to Terry Foster and some other African American media types with ties in the city of Detroit...there is a lot of residual dislike for Tiger Stadium among that population. It represents a lot of things they don't like. One thing being the Briggs family's hostility to blacks and they have a lot of memories of being treated badly by the old staff. There is also the resentment of folks like the Stadium preservation trust as a bunch of suburban LLBean-wearing trouble-makers.

Is that a factor? I don't know and maybe that is a bit overblown but I can bet they don't want a fetish for the old stadium prevent meaningful rennovation if it ever came.

I could also see the long arm of Mister Illitch trying to prevent other developers taking up land that he wants. Or maybe the guy who owns the old Michigan Ave train terminal is involved in keeping this delayed.

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There are plenty of other parks in the city of Detroit that could use some attention. Belle Isle was looking pretty shabby last time I was there. Tigers Stadium is gone. Build a Walmart there. Detroit needs one of those.

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The DEGC is a mess. They do a decent job with big projects (like the Book-Cadillac), but they do not understand the concept of small developments that help link neighborhoods together. Hell, when they knocked down Tiger Stadium one of the big reasons was that it would bring proposals to the table - where the hell are those now? Why not tell GM they can help maintain the park without putting any permanent structures on the site?

It just sickens me the amount of demolition of old buildings that have both legally (Lafayette Building, Statler Hotel) and illegally (Madison-Lenox Hotel...THANKS ILITCH!) occured throughout downtown. The DEGC has done a solid job of tearing apart the urban fabric that is downtown, just to see empty lots sprout weeds.

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What's the difference between abandoned buildings and vacant lots? What are they going to do with old buildings that need serious renovation?

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What's the difference between abandoned buildings and vacant lots? What are they going to do with old buildings that need serious renovation?

The Book Cadillac was an empty shell for decades and now it is a gorgeous, luxury hotel/apartment building. It was a huge part of Detroit's past and gives downtown character. The more we demolish the old buildings, the more we lose our history and unique character.

Downtown and Midtown are both at a really high rental rate of 95% or so for residential. The demand is there with a decent influx of professionals downtown and demand is going up. Instead of building new buildings (which can be nice), we should do all we can to preserve the Art Deco beauties that are quickly vanishing.

I wandered through Lafayette Gardens two days ago which is a new park on the site of the old Lafayette Building two days back. It's a decent park, but with all the development going on I was genuinely sad to think about what the site could be.

BTW - look at the Kales, Book-Cadillac, Fort Shelby, Broderick, Merchant's Row...those were all empty buildings...now they are alive and vibrant. We need to save our history.

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That's all good and well but until some new jobs keep coming in, there's going to be a peak on residential space. It won't hurt to Detroit to have some modern office space and buildings. Chicago still has a lot of its historic buildings mixed in with it's new development. I'm not sure companies really want to renovate old buildings vs. moving into modern class A office space.

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That's all good and well but until some new jobs keep coming in, there's going to be a peak on residential space. It won't hurt to Detroit to have some modern office space and buildings. Chicago still has a lot of its historic buildings mixed in with it's new development. I'm not sure companies really want to renovate old buildings vs. moving into modern class A office space.

New jobs do keep coming downtown. In the last two years plus next year downtown is gaining like 7,000 new jobs primarily from Quicken Loans and Blue Cross Blue Shield, but also a lot of other smaller companies. These organizations (DTE, Compuware, Quicken, BCBS) are offereing incentives to live downtown while the primary Midtown anchors (WSU, DMC, Henry Ford Health System) are offering incentives to live there. There is absolute and visible progress occurring and people are moving in.

Even though I disagree with this stance, I'd be fine if they built some new condos so long as they don't go knock down historic structures that are still salvageable.

Additionally, historic buildings can absolutely be class A office space. Gilbert has purchased the Chase, First National, Dime and Madison Buildings and is making them sparkling space for companies to move into.

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The Book Cadillac was an empty shell for decades and now it is a gorgeous, luxury hotel/apartment building. It was a huge part of Detroit's past and gives downtown character. The more we demolish the old buildings, the more we lose our history and unique character.

Downtown and Midtown are both at a really high rental rate of 95% or so for residential. The demand is there with a decent influx of professionals downtown and demand is going up. Instead of building new buildings (which can be nice), we should do all we can to preserve the Art Deco beauties that are quickly vanishing.

I wandered through Lafayette Gardens two days ago which is a new park on the site of the old Lafayette Building two days back. It's a decent park, but with all the development going on I was genuinely sad to think about what the site could be.

BTW - look at the Kales, Book-Cadillac, Fort Shelby, Broderick, Merchant's Row...those were all empty buildings...now they are alive and vibrant. We need to save our history.

I agree with the fact that you have to preserve architecture and history. I think for a lot of people are used to glittering new things...Detroit is bad at preservation for sure.

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Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Boston etc all have great preserved architecture. They also have a lot of modern architecture. You look at a skyline photo of Chicago in 1950 and it looks totally different than today. You look at Detroit in 1950 and today and the only difference is one large building that is inexplicably set aside from the rest of downtown. It just shows a total lack of growth.

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Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Boston etc all have great preserved architecture. They also have a lot of modern architecture. You look at a skyline photo of Chicago in 1950 and it looks totally different than today. You look at Detroit in 1950 and today and the only difference is one large building that is inexplicably set aside from the rest of downtown. It just shows a total lack of growth.

Well, yeah, nobody is arguing that Detroit has grown like NY and Chicago have.

So what's your belief? We should demo all old buildings and build new glass superblocks? We become a downtown Houston? If this is what you want I absolutely, 100% disagree.

If you think we should build new buildings, while letting the older buildings sit and wait for renovation, then I think that is more reasonable (even though I'd much prefer we get all current buildings occupied before we build new).

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Chicago hasn't grown. They've lost a million people since 1950. Why would building new buildings make Detroit Houston and not Chicago? Some buildings aren't worth salvaging. Like Tiger Stadium. Sure you could make something nice out of but really what function does a 50,000 seat, 100 year old stadium have? I suggest replacing some of the old buildings that need serious repair with something modern that will attract business from other states. It's nice that Dan Gilbert is investing in these buildings, but all he's doing is moving jobs from Livonia, or wherever he was headquartered to Detroit. Firms outside of Detroit don't see Detroit as a viable option.

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Chicago hasn't grown. They've lost a million people since 1950. Why would building new buildings make Detroit Houston and not Chicago? Some buildings aren't worth salvaging. Like Tiger Stadium. Sure you could make something nice out of but really what function does a 50,000 seat, 100 year old stadium have? I suggest replacing some of the old buildings that need serious repair with something modern that will attract business from other states. It's nice that Dan Gilbert is investing in these buildings, but all he's doing is moving jobs from Livonia, or wherever he was headquartered to Detroit. Firms outside of Detroit don't see Detroit as a viable option.

You never answered my question. My reference to Houston is if you think we should knock down all our historic buildings and build 80 story glass superblocks. Chicago itself does a fantastic job of intertwining new and old.

In reference to Tiger Stadium, you'd prefer it just to sit as an empty lot with no plans? Why not leave it up until there is a solid, approved proposal to redevelop the property? In the meantime, perhaps someone would have come up with a plan to incorporate facets of the old stadium into a mixed use commercial/residential development.

BTW, Quicken is having a job fair downtown THIS Saturday where they are hiring 500 people. That's not just suburb-city movement. Those are brand spankin' new jobs downtown.

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Tiger Stadium stood for 10 years and nobody came up with a solid proposal to redevelop it. In Chicago Comiskey was turned into a parking lot within a year of new Comiskey opening. Old Yankee Stadium is already gone. IIRC old Yankee Stadium is a parking lot as well.

Like I said, knock down the ones that need serious repair and replace them with new modern buildings.

I know someone who worked at Quicken. They aren't exactly glamor jobs. Base pay is $10 an hour and you're basically a telemarketer.

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Tiger Stadium stood for 10 years and nobody came up with a solid proposal to redevelop it. In Chicago Comiskey was turned into a parking lot within a year of new Comiskey opening. Old Yankee Stadium is already gone. IIRC old Yankee Stadium is a parking lot as well.

Like I said, knock down the ones that need serious repair and replace them with new modern buildings.

When they knocked it down there was NO proposal. Why knock it down if there is no proposal? What magical modern building do you know of that is going to be built there? Why not leave it up if there is no proposal to see if a new idea comes into redevelop the structure? It's not as simple and demo old building, build new building. There are economics, demand, developers involved here.

I know someone who worked at Quicken. They aren't exactly glamor jobs. Base pay is $10 an hour and you're basically a telemarketer.

Read the link below. I've heard about their banking jobs and they don't have a great reputation, but they are hiring for all types of jobs with pay of about $50k. I also know people in computer design, community outreach, PR, and buisiness intelligence there - and they all enjoy it. These new jobs are in all departments and are real, well-paying jobs.

"The company wants to hire in several areas, including mortgage banking, marketing and technology. No experience is required for the mortgage banking positions. A listing of positions is at Quicken Loans Careers .

The Web site notes that the mortgage banking positions pay an average of $45,000-$55,000 in the first year. Quicken also pays for training, offers opportunities for rewards and prizes and provides benefits such as a 401(k) match, health insurance and tuition reimbursement."

Quicken Loans seeks 500 new workers through job fair Saturday in Detroit | Detroit Free Press | freep.com

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The City of Detroit owned Tiger Stadium. It would cost too much to keep it up. There's no functional use for 50,000 seat stadium that's 100 years old and in need of serious repair. The Packard plant has been standing for over 50 years and I don't see any plans for that. No other city lets there buildings stand and decay as much as Detroit.

As for Quicken, that salary is BS. Starting salary is $20,800 a year. You work 50-60 hours and you can make 35,000-40,000 with bonuses. I know someone who worked there and got his license and went on to become a real mortgage broker. It's a good entry level job if you want to get into that field. My sister interviewed there recently. During the interview they make you do a sales call and try to sell a satellite TV package. She said it's nothing but cubicles and you're on the phone 80% of the time selling loans.

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The City of Detroit owned Tiger Stadium. It would cost too much to keep it up. There's no functional use for 50,000 seat stadium that's 100 years old and in need of serious repair. The Packard plant has been standing for over 50 years and I don't see any plans for that. No other city lets there buildings stand and decay as much as Detroit.

As for Quicken, that salary is BS. Starting salary is $20,800 a year. You work 50-60 hours and you can make 35,000-40,000 with bonuses. I know someone who worked there and got his license and went on to become a real mortgage broker. It's a good entry level job if you want to get into that field. My sister interviewed there recently. During the interview they make you do a sales call and try to sell a satellite TV package. She said it's nothing but cubicles and you're on the phone 80% of the time selling loans.

a) It's unfortunate that many people in the DEGC have your mind frame. It's helped deplete Detroit of our rich heritage.

b) You didn't even bother to read the fact that different positions are open. And where did you get the $20k is starting salary for these jobs...or is that just your Delmas-intuition speaking again?

Edited by monkeynuts

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It's unfortunate many people would rather leave derelict buildings standing and hope someone comes along with a plan. Chicago has a rich history that hasn't been depleted by their new development. Leaving all these old buildings stand that have no use is just a testament to the past glory days.

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With regards to Quicken, I'm using inside sources. Basically it's a mortgage mill and you pull applications off places like Lending Tree and call them up and sell them a mortgage. 90% of the people they hire will be mortgage bankers.

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It's unfortunate many people would rather leave derelict buildings standing and hope someone comes along with a plan. Chicago has a rich history that hasn't been depleted by their new development. Leaving all these old buildings stand that have no use is just a testament to the past glory days.

Okkkkkay. I'm done debating you on this.

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In other major cities, buildings are torn down with a plan for replacement, redevelopment, and revitalization in mind.

When Yankee Stadium was torn down, its redevelopment into a park was already in place. Same goes for Shea, etc.

Detroit is a place that is desperate for any type of development. The thinking has been, "If you clear it, they will come." Nothing could be further from the truth. They've cleared out tons of buildings and replaced them with either a) nothing or b) parking lots. Demolition, then what? Nothing.

The only party that benefits from demolition is the contractor involved.

Edited by markmeista

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In other major cities, buildings are torn down with a plan for replacement, redevelopment, and revitalization in mind.

When Yankee Stadium was torn down, its redevelopment into a park was already in place. Same goes for Shea, etc.

Detroit is a place that is desperate for any type of development. The thinking has been, "If you clear it, they will come." Nothing could be further from the truth. They've cleared out tons of buildings and replaced them with either a) nothing or b) parking lots. Demolition, then what? Nothing.

The only party that benefits from demolition is the contractor involved.

Detroit is basically Adamo Group's personal piggy bank.

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