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Things that put a smile on your face.... (keep it clean!)

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I have not. I have had fairly decent tenants. Knock on wood. But I tell them to wipe up standing water. Don't let water sit on the floor.

I had a house that had a fairly significant amount of water on it for about a half hour. Washer water level sensor went out and overfilled. We guess it was about a half hour and we mopped it up and everything was fine.

Maybe I've been lucky with the products I've purchased, but they seem to go together really tight. I don't overspend on the floors. Mostly Lowes or Home Depot.

Have I been lucky?

I'm not sure, to be honest. Just fact checking some stuff that I have been told by others. Do you treat laminate at all after its installed? Seems that any bit of the uncoated joint would be susceptible to water damage.

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My brother in law built their house outside Raleigh, NC about 15 years ago. He was the primary contractor, spent a big part of his early life on boats. He came from a family of oystermen. He put hardwood floors thru out the house, used 7 coats of whatever they used on boats. Walking oon his floors was like trying to cross an ice rink

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I'm not sure, to be honest. Just fact checking some stuff that I have been told by others. Do you treat laminate at all after its installed? Seems that any bit of the uncoated joint would be susceptible to water damage.

I did not. We had some sort of sealant and thought we'd try it. So before we left at night we put a little on a scap piece and the snap together joint seemed to swell a little. Didn't snap together as well. Is that the joint you are asking about? Or the outer edges? Outer edges not really a joint so assume you meant the snap together parts.

The reason I said not to let water get underneath is simply the manufacturer said not to let water get underneath, but also we would leave scraps outside and in the mornings the joints would be swollen presumably from dew.

I don't think there is any way to protect floors from serious water damage regardless of the flooring. I had to replace a bunch of tile where water damage had occurred. I think one could go to great lengths to protect a floor and you are probably wasting time and money. Edit... Cuz the floor is really durable under normal wear and tear and if something catastrophic happens, no extra work will make any big difference.

Edited by yeahbuddy

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I meant the snap together parts. Thank you, this has been helpful.

I agree that there is no practical way to prevent heavy water damage. Technically it could be done, if money and the EPA were not an issue.☺

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If there was foam under Huey's flooring, it was a floating floor. It would be difficult to keep water from seeping down.

What we had installed was actually an engineered hardwood with a very hard satin finish that was manufactured for commercial use. It is glued to the concrete with a special white adhesive that waterproofs from underneath and provides some protection as well between the boards because the glue works up into that gap, yet isn't visible from the top. I don't know that it would do well in a major flood situation, esp. if it sits for any period of time. But it sure has held up to wet feet, the occasional dog accident or spill, etc. It really still looks new, even though it's in a heavy traffic area and is around ten years old.

I like it so well that I'm planning to use the same product installed horizontally as the backsplash in my kitchen remodel.

Edited by Melody

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If there was foam under Huey's flooring, it was a floating floor. It would be difficult to keep water from seeping down.

What we had installed was actually an engineered hardwood with a very hard satin finish that was manufactured for commercial use. It is glued to the concrete with a special white adhesive that waterproofs from underneath and provides some protection as well between the boards because the glue works up into that gap. I don't know that it would do well in a major flood situation, esp. if it sits for any period of time. But it sure has held up to wet feet, the occasional dog accident or spill, etc. It really still looks new, even though it's in a heavy traffic area.

I like it so well that I'm planning to use the same product installed horizontally as the backsplash in my kitchen remodel.

It is a thin high density foam. Allows the individual panels to give, thus the inability to seal. Concrete beneath.

We had the water solenoid leaking for I don't know how long under the refrigerator, a clogged sink drain which we discovered coming home after the dishwasher had dumped all the waste and rinse water on the floor and a washing machine that ran a full cycle dumping that water.

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It is a thin high density foam. Allows the individual panels to give, thus the inability to seal. Concrete beneath.

We had the water solenoid leaking for I don't know how long under the refrigerator, a clogged sink drain which we discovered coming home after the dishwasher had dumped all the waste and rinse water on the floor and a washing machine that ran a full cycle dumping that water.

Yeah. The bamboo floors we put into my daughter's room were made like that. The drain on the a/c unit got clogged and the condensation ran into her closet and under the flooring to her room. We didn't realize it until we started hearing squishing noises. What a mess!

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Today LPZEPPOLE.JPG

is St. Joseph's day, or as we Italians call it, The Feast of San Giuseppe.

Its celebrated by eating St. Joseph's pastries. Zeppole filled with either cannoli cream, or Italian custard. I will be celebrating.

I will.

Oh, yes I will.

Thus concludes my entry for "things that make you smile".

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Today LPZEPPOLE.JPG

is St. Joseph's day, or as we Italians call it, The Feast of San Giuseppe.

Its celebrated by eating St. Joseph's pastries. Zeppole filled with either cannoli cream, or Italian custard. I will be celebrating.

I will.

Oh, yes I will.

Thus concludes my entry for "things that make you smile".

That looks REALLY tasty.

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They are really good. My preference is for the cannoli cream, but the custard is also good.

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My brother in law built their house outside Raleigh, NC about 15 years ago. He was the primary contractor, spent a big part of his early life on boats. He came from a family of oystermen. He put hardwood floors thru out the house, used 7 coats of whatever they used on boats. Walking oon his floors was like trying to cross an ice rink

Rugs...lots and lots of rugs...and oh yeah take your shoes off.

I only put down 3 coats and have a couple close calls. Walking down the stairs with my daughter in my left arm, holding the banister with my left hand, make the turn (there are 4 stairs at the bottom that curve 90 degrees) and slip a little down a step...luckily I kept my balance, but I gave myself a moderate case of whiplash, keeping my daughter in my arms while keeping my balance, that hurt like hell for 3-4 days. The next day I ordered carpet treads to put down. I had been meaning to do it for awhile.

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If there was foam under Huey's flooring, it was a floating floor. It would be difficult to keep water from seeping down.

What we had installed was actually an engineered hardwood with a very hard satin finish that was manufactured for commercial use. It is glued to the concrete with a special white adhesive that waterproofs from underneath and provides some protection as well between the boards because the glue works up into that gap, yet isn't visible from the top. I don't know that it would do well in a major flood situation, esp. if it sits for any period of time. But it sure has held up to wet feet, the occasional dog accident or spill, etc. It really still looks new, even though it's in a heavy traffic area and is around ten years old.

I like it so well that I'm planning to use the same product installed horizontally as the backsplash in my kitchen remodel.

I had to take back a bunch of the 3/4 I bought for another living room in the house when I put down the hardwood because this room was sitting on a concrete slab. I considered using the adhesive, then balked and tried to put ply over the cement. It was some pretty dense cement because it was killing all my mason drill bits for the tapcons I was going to use. Ended up having to take back all the hardwood (they charged my 250.00 for a 'restocking' fee), the adhesive I bought (2 5 gallon drums of and that stuff is HEAVY), and the 3/4 ply I bought for the sub floor...ended up calling a carpet place to just put carpet down. The wife preferred carpet anyway, but I really wanted the hardwood through out the entire floor.

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I had to take back a bunch of the 3/4 I bought for another living room in the house when I put down the hardwood because this room was sitting on a concrete slab. I considered using the adhesive, then balked and tried to put ply over the cement. It was some pretty dense cement because it was killing all my mason drill bits for the tapcons I was going to use. Ended up having to take back all the hardwood (they charged my 250.00 for a 'restocking' fee), the adhesive I bought (2 5 gallon drums of and that stuff is HEAVY), and the 3/4 ply I bought for the sub floor...ended up calling a carpet place to just put carpet down. The wife preferred carpet anyway, but I really wanted the hardwood through out the entire floor.

Tapcon's are much easier to work with than those old masonry nails. Are you using a hammer drill? If not, that could be the cause of the bits not lasting as long.

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Tapcon's are much easier to work with than those old masonry nails. Are you using a hammer drill? If not, that could be the cause of the bits not lasting as long.

Hammer drill. I even went and got hex head ones (the tapcons after a couple holes got through) and those burned out also...the heads went flying all over the place. It was really weird. I have used them before. I was also worried about the number of holes I was going to have to make (needed about 6 4x8 pieces of plywood...x4-5 holes per) new house and I was not as sure about the construction so I worried about the cement cracking with so many holes.

If the wife did not prefer carpet I was going to make it work somehow, but I had a complete kitchen demo/remodel along with the floors and the other misc things you need to do when moving into a new house. It was a hectic 7 days of my life....and still not done. I will get to it...eventually.

A good tip for the mason drills is to keep a cup of water near by and to cool the bit after a pass. At least that is the tip I got from my carpenter friends.

Edited by John_Brian_K

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Hammer drill. I even went and got hex head ones (the tapcons after a couple holes got through) and those burned out also...the heads went flying all over the place. It was really weird. I have used them before. I was also worried about the number of holes I was going to have to make (needed about 6 4x8 pieces of plywood...x4-5 holes per) new house and I was not as sure about the construction so I worried about the cement cracking with so many holes.

If the wife did not prefer carpet I was going to make it work somehow, but I had a complete kitchen demo/remodel along with the floors and the other misc things you need to do when moving into a new house. It was a hectic 7 days of my life....and still not done. I will get to it...eventually.

A good tip for the mason drills is to keep a cup of water near by and to cool the bit after a pass. At least that is the tip I got from my carpenter friends.

I have a special tapcon bit, which has carbide tips. They claim they are also a special diameter, but I'm not convinced that is true. I would be curious if non Tapcon bits work the same as Tapcon bits. Does that make sense?

IOW; you can buy carbide tipped mason bits at a particular diameter. Is the Tapcon bits really any different?

I don't know, but would like to. If so, they might work better. Or they might not.

As a fellow home type Bob Vila, I enjoy reading about other peoples "adventures" in re-modeling. Sometimes it doesn't go quite as planned. :-(

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I have a special tapcon bit, which has carbide tips. They claim they are also a special diameter, but I'm not convinced that is true. I would be curious if non Tapcon bits work the same as Tapcon bits. Does that make sense?

IOW; you can buy carbide tipped mason bits at a particular diameter. Is the Tapcon bits really any different?

I don't know, but would like to. If so, they might work better. Or they might not.

As a fellow home type Bob Vila, I enjoy reading about other peoples "adventures" in re-modeling. Sometimes it doesn't go quite as planned. :-(

Yeah I use the tapcon bits. They usually come with the screws. I bought extra. Still have them somewhere in the garage.

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Why not use adhesive to put down the sub floor?

Once I decided not to use the adhesive to put the 3/4 right on the cement I planned on taking it back. It was close to 200.00 for the adhesive and I was already running over budget so I was pinching pennies. Also, after putting the floor down in the dining room and the wife saying she would rather have carpet anyway I started weighing the work -v- reward. I wanted harwood, but she was happier with carpet and it is tough work putting in hardwood when the floor is already ready for it let alone putting a sub floor down before even starting.

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Yeah I use the tapcon bits. They usually come with the screws. I bought extra. Still have them somewhere in the garage.

Ok, just curious. I've run into the same thing when drilling into cinderblock. Seems there are hard spots, which is entirely possible in any concrete. I've always wondered about their bits/screws though.

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I had to take back a bunch of the 3/4 I bought for another living room in the house when I put down the hardwood because this room was sitting on a concrete slab. I considered using the adhesive, then balked and tried to put ply over the cement. It was some pretty dense cement because it was killing all my mason drill bits for the tapcons I was going to use. Ended up having to take back all the hardwood (they charged my 250.00 for a 'restocking' fee), the adhesive I bought (2 5 gallon drums of and that stuff is HEAVY), and the 3/4 ply I bought for the sub floor...ended up calling a carpet place to just put carpet down. The wife preferred carpet anyway, but I really wanted the hardwood through out the entire floor.

Yeah, you have to use the engineered wood on concrete. Our flooring was actually pretty cheap, comparatively, because it wasn't a recognizable brand that advertises in the decorating magazines. As I said, it was manufactured for commercial buildings with high traffic. We had to pay to have it installed, had to wait a while to get a crew out, and the installation was pretty expensive because the specific adhesive required an expertise that not all flooring installers have. These guys traveled quite a distance to do this job.

So worth it, though. I love those floors! Gorgeous, durable. All I ever do to them is dust mop then swish a barely damp polyfiber rag over them using a deck brush. Most of my house is tiled, and those tile floors are much more work to maintain.

When we took up the wall to wall carpet in the front room to have that wood installed I was completely grossed out by what was under it. So much dirt and dust.

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Yeah. The bamboo floors we put into my daughter's room were made like that. The drain on the a/c unit got clogged and the condensation ran into her closet and under the flooring to her room. We didn't realize it until we started hearing squishing noises. What a mess!

We had that happen two years ago iin a bedroom. Found out our new A/C did not have a high water shutdown float on it.

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