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Armando Galarraga named Player of the Week

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I thought this was worthy of its own thread, but if it's deemed not appropriate please delete it.

Armando Galarraga of the Detroit Tigers named Bank of America Presents the American League Player of the Week

Detroit Tigers right-hander Armando Galarraga has been named Bank of America Presents the American League Player of the Week for the period ending June 6th. Bank of America, the Official Bank of Major League Baseball, is the presenting sponsor of the American League and National League Player of the Week Awards, which reflect Bank of America's long-standing tradition of promoting and recognizing higher standards of accomplishment.

On June 2nd, Galarraga lost a bid for a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning, on a play that was ruled an infield hit by Cleveland's Jason Donald. Instead, the 28-year-old native of Caracas, Venezuela ended the day with his first-ever complete game and shutout in the three-strikeout performance. In an emotional and difficult circumstance, Galarraga's remarkable display of grace and exemplary sportsmanship equaled his greatness on the mound. For both performances, Armando has been awarded the first weekly honor of his career. Prior to Detroit's 3-0 victory on Wednesday, Galarraga had not limited a team to just one hit since July 22, 2009, when he held the mark through 7.1 innings. On Wednesday, Galarraga joined Mike Mussina (2001 vs. Red Sox) and Pedro Martinez (1995 vs. Padres) as the only three pitchers in the past 20 years to have retired at least 26 consecutive batters in a game without completing the perfecto. The last Tigers pitcher to lose a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning was Milt Wilcox against the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park on April 15, 1983. Armando made history on Wednesday, becoming the first Tigers pitcher to fire a complete-game, one-hitter since Mike Maroth did so on July 16, 2004 against the New York Yankees at Comerica Park.

Other noteworthy performances included Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim outfielder Torii Hunter, who tied Major League-bests with five doubles and 10 RBI, and Boston Red Sox catcher Victor Martinez, who led the Majors with a .600 batting average and a .667 on-base percentage. Also considered was Seattle Mariners outfielder Ichiro Suzuki, who is currently the leading vote-getter at his position for the 2010 American League All-Star team, and led the A.L. with 13 hits and four stolen bases last week.

The Bank of America Presents the American League Player of the Week, Armando Galarraga, is awarded a watch courtesy of Game Time, the leader in licensed sports watches, available at MLB.com.

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He should win the Espy for Sportsman of the Year as well for the way he handled everything.

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He should win the Espy for Sportsman of the Year as well for the way he handled everything.

I totally agree.

Any word on whether or not he'll be making an appearance on The Late Show? I read somewhere that Letterman invited him to be on the show but didn't hear anything about whether or not he'd be doing it.

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I'm feeling a little perfect gamed out. I'm glad he's back on the bump Tuesday night, because it'll really feel like we've turned the page. We'll always have the memories, but it's time to get on with gettin' on.

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hopefully once bud selig is gone they will reverse it. friggin patsy

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hopefully once bud selig is gone they will reverse it. friggin patsy

It will never be reversed. The great Obama has decreed that Selig made the right call.

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It's gotten past the point where I even care about a reversal. I was hoping for it the day after but it doesn't matter anymore. It's a great story the way it is.

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Imagine if the plate ump has a small strike zone tonight and Galarraga finally loses it unleashing a stream of obscenities and firing his glove into the stands.

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Just imagine if he goes into the fifth tonight without allowing a hit. I almost hope he gives up one right away so people will stop talking about it.

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They will never reverse it. Get over it.

How about No? If past commish's can strike no hitters from the books, I don't see why a future commish, who holds the power and not from the Selig school of thought, can't award Gaga the perfecto? I'm not expecting it to happen soon, but when most of the baseball circles view this as a Perfect Game themselves, even unofficially, I think it has a great chance to eventually be overturned.

Edited by FloridaTigers

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How about No? If past commish's can strike no hitters from the books, I don't see why a future commish, who holds the power and not from the Selig school of thought, can't award Gaga the perfecto? I'm not expecting it to happen soon, but when most of the baseball circles view this as a Perfect Game themselves, even unofficially, I think it has a great chance to eventually be overturned.

I wouldn't say there is a "great" chance. Sure, it's possible...but realistically it's a pretty slight chance. There are wrong calls made every day, some are to end games, which is far more important than a perfect game. The commissioners in the past have changed certain things, but it's not like it happens very often.

I guess I wouldn't care if they changed it in five years. It's done and other with now, I'm ready to move on. We all know he threw the perfect game. The fans and players were robbed of the celebration. That is something that will never come back, whether he's given the perfecto in the future or not. It's time to focus on new things, I say..

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We all know he threw the perfect game.

This is the part that bothers me. EVERYONE KNOWS HE ACTUALLY THREW A PERFECT GAME, so how is it wrong to make sure the history books properly reflect that?

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How about No? If past commish's can strike no hitters from the books, I don't see why a future commish, who holds the power and not from the Selig school of thought, can't award Gaga the perfecto? I'm not expecting it to happen soon, but when most of the baseball circles view this as a Perfect Game themselves, even unofficially, I think it has a great chance to eventually be overturned.

Do you really not see the difference between Fay Vincent's decision on the definition of a true no-hitter and overturning an umpire's on-the-field judgment call? Do you honestly believe they are exactly the same thing?

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Here is a really good argument supporting the decision to not award the perfect game, from a writer at Baseball Reference. I've bolded what I thought was a great argument he used that had not occurred to me.

Baseball-Reference Blog » Blog Archive » The non-reversal of Jim Joyce’s call

The morning after Jim Joyce's mistaken call on what should have been the final out of a perfect game by Armando Galarraga, I posted on this blog that there was absolutely no way that Commissioner Selig would reverse or overturn Joyce's call and change the official account of the affected game.

I was so sure because in the long history of baseball, there are many such examples of questionable calls occurring in games of both much greater and much less significance, and no such call (a judgment call by an umpire) has ever been overturned. The only reversals have come after determination that the umpire incorrectly interpreted the official rules of baseball in making a game decision.

This still leaves the question of whether MLB was correct to leave the call unchanged. I feel that unequivocally this was the right decision.

My position is best summed up by Jim Bouton, who gave his opinion to the New York Times. The Times quotes Bouton as saying:

"I never believed a game was lost because of a bad call by an umpire. Games were lost because the loser didn’t build a sufficient margin to overcome the inevitable missed calls, part of any game. (Note: Players make far more mistakes than umpires)."

Bouton hit the nail on the head. Bad calls happen, including balls and strikes, fair and foul, catches and traps, tags and missed tags, bases touched and bases missed, and throws beating runners and runners beating throws. When a perfect game happens, we now know to say that not only did the pitcher and his defense perform exceptionally, but so did the umpires.

Moreover, this was not as simple a blown call by Joyce as many seem to think. Miguel Cabrera, a terrible defensive player, had no business coming off the bag to fetch a ball headed straight for second baseman Carlos Guillen. Cabrera panicked and made a bone-head move that resulted in a much tighter play at first than if he had simply retreated to the bag and allowed Guillen to field and flip the ball.

I'm not saying that this is Cabrera's fault--after all the play was still made. But the excess of moving parts and the awkward 3-1 defensive move contributed needlessly to the complexity of the play and increased the likelihood that any umpire would make a mistake.

To go back and reverse this call would be akin to tearing up all the box scores and records from the last 140 years. The 20 times that a pitcher was perfect, he overcame all obstacles including bad calls and mistakes by everyone in play. The 2010 Tigers did not overcome all obstacles. To artificially add Galarraga to this list would cheapen what was achieved before by the other pitchers. It would cheapen the Royals' victory in the 1985 World Series by implying that a very similar missed call was deemed not important enough to be reversed.

Does anybody think we should go back and reverse some of the late Eric Gregg's calls in Game 5 of the 1997 NLCS? If baseball ever decided to change old calls, I'd like to see this game erased from the record books. As the record stands, Livan Hernandez pitched a 3-hitter that included 15 strikeouts. Only, many of the strikeouts late in that game were on called strike-threes that should have been called balls. Some of these pitches were as much as 6 inches off the outside of the plate and some of them were called by Gregg before the ball was in the catcher's mitt. (That sounds like a joke based on the umpiring by Leslie Nielsen's character in 1988's The Naked Gun, but it really happened in this 1997 NLCS game.) After the game, we got what should have been mutually exclusive results: Hernandez became a legend and Gregg became a clown. How can both be true? In reality, Hernandez is a good pitcher with a good career and some great moments and Gregg was a bad umpire who didn't stick around in MLB much longer. The official record, however, has it that Hernandez was a superstar and Gregg was just another umpire.

The Braves were robbed of a chance to rally against a single-run deficit in this game by the umpiring of Eric Gregg....or were they? I doubt the Braves hitters would tell you that. They would tell you that every umpire is different and calls a different strike zone. Sometimes those strike zones differ from game to game. They would tell you that they knew that Gregg was calling outside strikes and they knew they needed to swing at those pitches or be prepared to take a strike. Is it fair? No, but nor is it unfair. It was the way it was. Perhaps Gregg got caught up in the emotion of an exciting playoff game. Perhaps this clouded his judgment. Gregg called that game like he saw it, and Joyce called his game the other night the way he saw it.

The fact of the matter is that the way these games were called is the way they shall stand forever in history. Hernandez is credited with an achievement a little bit better than what he deserves, and Galarraga is credited with something a little bit worse than what he deserves. It goes both ways. Maybe Joyce was distracted by the enormity of the moment or by Cabrera's plodding, but the fact of the matter is that the infield hit, the 3-1 fielding play, and the call by Joyce are all what happened. Those are the facts, that is reality, and it is never going to change.

Stop telling MLB to change history.

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How do you overcome all obstacles when every batter makes an out exactly? What obstacles? If there was a bad call or an error then it wouldn't have been perfect game.

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Just imagine if he goes into the fifth tonight without allowing a hit. I almost hope he gives up one right away so people will stop talking about it.

So you don't approve of my only posts in the game thread being:

29.

30.

31.

And so on until a Chicagoan reaches?

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How do you overcome all obstacles when every batter makes an out exactly? What obstacles? If there was a bad call or an error then it wouldn't have been perfect game.

I don't think that's what he means. In this case Joyce called him safe, and that presented the barrier to the perfect game. In another universe Joyce calls him out. I think his point is, **** happens and it either all breaks your way to make it happen, or it doesn't. Either way, them's the breaks and you gotta live with it. But if you're going to make special exceptions to appease the fans this time whereas you didn't make the exception there because the outcry didn't happen to be as great, then where's the integrity?

Now, people can argue all they want that there's no integrity in not turning over Joyce's call because we could all see Galarraga beat the hitter to the bag. I would counterargue that allowing all umpires' judgment calls on the field to stand after the fact, no matter how wrong they look on replay, is the highest form of integrity there can be here. Integrity is undermined when decisions are made to selectively overturn some umpires' calls while allowing others to stand. If that happened, then nobody would ever trust the game, ever again. And that might very well be the first nail in Baseball's coffin.

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