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Galarraga throws perfect game

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I will always consider it a 28-out perfect game for Galarraga.

I will also always believe Joyce had predetermined that if it was close ..he was going to call the runner safe.  Whether it was a "Detroit Tiger" thing or a "Venezuelan" (racist) thing ..I do not know. 

And still ..to this day ..no matter how hard I try ..I remain unable to convince myself that such a highly regarded 24-year (at the time) veteran umpire could so spiritedly miss that call.

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3 minutes ago, Tigrrfan said:

I will always consider it a 28-out perfect game for Galarraga.

I will also always believe Joyce had predetermined that if it was close ..he was going to call the runner safe.  Whether it was a "Detroit Tiger" thing or a "Venezuelan" (racist) thing ..I do not know. 

And still ..to this day ..no matter how hard I try ..I remain unable to convince myself that such a highly regarded 24-year (at the time) veteran umpire could so spiritedly miss that call.

I'm not sure what that motivation was but he did seem to have predetermined something in his head. I used to ump high school and sometimes your instincts just take over and call what you see.

Other times you see one thing, think about how badly you want the call to go the other way, then make a call without really thinking and its wrong. Im thinking of times when a 14 year old kid has thrown 15 straight balls and then one is finally kind of close to the strikezone...

Not exactly the last out of a perfect game but mistakes can be made. 

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17 hours ago, gmoney said:

Actually, had Joyce not messed up the call, Galarraga wouldn't be known by hardly anyone outside of Detroit.  He'd be just another mediocre pitcher to throw a perfect game that no one remembered.  

It really sucks for Galarraga though.

 

I forget when it was, but maybe the next season, Galarraga was perfect through 5 or 6 innings.

Exactly.  Dallas Braden threw a perfect game on Mother's Day in 2010.  Braden lost his mother to cancer and was raised by his grandmother, who was at the game and celebrated his perfection on the field with him in a nice Hollywood sort of moment.  But that game doesn't get the Hollywood treatment.  Galarraga does.  

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On ‎9‎/‎30‎/‎2019 at 6:09 PM, Tigrrfan said:

I will always consider it a 28-out perfect game for Galarraga.

I will also always believe Joyce had predetermined that if it was close ..he was going to call the runner safe.  Whether it was a "Detroit Tiger" thing or a "Venezuelan" (racist) thing ..I do not know. 

And still ..to this day ..no matter how hard I try ..I remain unable to convince myself that such a highly regarded 24-year (at the time) veteran umpire could so spiritedly miss that call.

Come on.  He just blew the call.

It happens once in a great while, just like a fielder dropping an easy pop up.

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a race thing?  Give me a break.  I think he just froze... maybe his mind said out but his body said safe... it was a tense situation.  If it was intentional then he wouldn't have reacted the way he did...  He was crying in the umpires room.  Thta wasn't because he "got caught" in his smear attempt. He knew he blew the call and felt horrible about it.  

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Oblong said:

a race thing?  Give me a break.  I think he just froze... maybe his mind said out but his body said safe... it was a tense situation.  If it was intentional then he wouldn't have reacted the way he did...  He was crying in the umpires room.  Thta wasn't because he "got caught" in his smear attempt. He knew he blew the call and felt horrible about it.  

 

 

I agree--nothing sinister.  Just a bad moment.

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15 minutes ago, Oblong said:

a race thing?  Give me a break.  I think he just froze... maybe his mind said out but his body said safe... it was a tense situation.  If it was intentional then he wouldn't have reacted the way he did...  He was crying in the umpires room.  Thta wasn't because he "got caught" in his smear attempt. He knew he blew the call and felt horrible about it.  

He was also very emotional about it the next day at home plate when Galarraga delivered the game ball.

I think the most important thing in all of this is the grace that Galarraga showed. He didn't throw a fit. He simply turned and smiled. He was publicly a class act throughout the entire event.

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Correct on all counts.

And as a parent of young sons just starting playing sports, including baseball, at the time, man, what a great example he set for my sons.  I will always appreciate him for that fact alone.

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2 hours ago, Biff Mayhem said:

I think the most important thing in all of this is the grace that Galarraga showed. He didn't throw a fit. He simply turned and smiled. He was publicly a class act throughout the entire event.

Yes .. absolutely a class act all the way.  

Everybody ..and I mean EVERYBODY ..except JJ knew that runner was out.  Nobody needs tell me I may be way off my rocker.  It surely isn't the first time.  Just that the safe call ..the actual 'motion' of it all ..is still so vivid in my mind.  

 

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On 9/30/2019 at 6:09 PM, Tigrrfan said:

I will always consider it a 28-out perfect game for Galarraga.

I will also always believe Joyce had predetermined that if it was close ..he was going to call the runner safe.  Whether it was a "Detroit Tiger" thing or a "Venezuelan" (racist) thing ..I do not know. 

And still ..to this day ..no matter how hard I try ..I remain unable to convince myself that such a highly regarded 24-year (at the time) veteran umpire could so spiritedly miss that call.

I think you are way, way out of bounds here. 

First of all - Jim Joyce was considered the best umpire by the players who get polled every year. 

Secondly - The amount of remorse that guy felt when he saw the video was undoubted.   If he had some kind of agenda he would never have reacted the way he did.  He was devastated. 

He simply blew the call.   

I always wondered if Jason Donald thought about telling him "call me out, call me out".    By his reaction, he knew he was out. 

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5 hours ago, Biff Mayhem said:

He was also very emotional about it the next day at home plate when Galarraga delivered the game ball.

I think the most important thing in all of this is the grace that Galarraga showed. He didn't throw a fit. He simply turned and smiled. He was publicly a class act throughout the entire event.

Joyce admitted he made a mistake right after the game when he had a chance to see the replay.  He was emotional once he realized his mistake.

Really, once that play was over and Leyland got back to the dugout, Galarraga and Joyce handled the situation about as well as they could, probably better than what many folks would have expected.

The one thing about Galarraga that I wonder about, was he just in shock of the whole situation or was he just the even tempered where he decided, "OK, the runner is safe and I just have to focus on the next batter now"?

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I suspect Joyce is liked by players, in part, because he is approachable and isn't an ***.

I think Bouton talked about it in Ball Four about how as long as an umpire hustles in the field and admits a mistake when they happen, the players will not get on them and respect them for that.  The players know mistakes get made.

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I mean it would definitely suck to get robbed of a perfect game and I would definitely be today upset at first but I don't think it would be something I would dwell on for weeks and months after. 

I think an athlete would be more apt to dwell on it if it was something they did wrong like maybe shake the catcher off and go with a different pitch only for that to get crushed or miss on their location etc.  but if it was something out of their control I don't think they would think much about throughout the season. 

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I also think a guy can say “well I know I did it regardless of what it says on a piece of paper.”    I did a 5K a few years ago with a goal in mind. It was a course I did several times already.  The “official” course ended up being long. I had 3.35 on my garmin and everyone else had similar. The race company even said they probably mismarked it.  So I didn’t reach my “goal” according to them but according to my pace I did so I took that as an accomplishment.  I beat it last year anyway.  

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Yeah, I think a subgroup are content with what they did independent of what the official record says.

Bouton talked about it a little Ball Four.  He had reached a point in his career that if he pitched well (complete game back then), allowed a few runs or less, he didn't care what the game outcome was, he knew he did his job and that was all he cared about.

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That was the 1969 Seattle Pilots, too, so there wasn’t that much to care about.

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On 10/2/2019 at 10:15 PM, Oblong said:

I also think a guy can say “well I know I did it regardless of what it says on a piece of paper.”    I did a 5K a few years ago with a goal in mind. It was a course I did several times already.  The “official” course ended up being long. I had 3.35 on my garmin and everyone else had similar. The race company even said they probably mismarked it.  So I didn’t reach my “goal” according to them but according to my pace I did so I took that as an accomplishment.  I beat it last year anyway.  

I once rank a 5k that was actually 3.3.  it wasn't a strong field because most of the fast guys were in the 10K at the same time.  I was in the rare position of being in first place at what I thought was the 3 mile mark based on my time - about 18 minutes.  There were two other guys running right behind me.  So I sprinted towards the the finish line which I though was right around the next corner.  When I turned the corner I saw the finish line much further down the road than I expected.  So, I kept sprinting because I had a chance to win my first race in 25 years of racing.  I barely hung on to win and nearly collapsed at the finish line.  Then I had to explain to friends how I won a 5k in a time of 19 minutes plus.   It's never easy.     

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2 hours ago, chasfh said:

That was the 1969 Seattle Pilots, too, so there wasn’t that much to care about.

Actually, he was with the Astros in a pennant chase at the time, and he got tagged for a loss.

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