Jump to content
apabruce

Book Notes?

Recommended Posts

No Danielle Steel? :glasses:

I just got through with King's "Wind Through The Keyhole".

One of the better Dark Tower books.

I also just got through with "Age of Miracles" by Karen Thompson Walker.

A story about the end of the world seen through the eyes of an eleven year old girl. My girlfriend recommended it to me so I had to read it or get stink eye for days on end.

Surprisingly, I enjoyed the heck out of it. But beware, it's about as cheerful as McCarthy's "The Road".

Edited by Antrat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BetMGM Michigan $200 Free Offer - Launching Friday (1/22)

BetMGM Michigan Sports Betting
Michigan online sports betting is launching on Friday, January 22, 2021. Pre-register at BetMGM Sportsbook & Casino and get a free $200 bonus at their online sportsbook & casino with no deposit necessary.

Claim $200 at BetMGM Michigan Now

I'm reading Chronicle right now, Bob Dylan's autobiography. The writing is pretty dry, but there are some interesting tidbits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No Danielle Steel? :glasses:

Ripping a bodice is still an unticked item on my bucket list. :silly:

But as far as reading, James Patterson is usually as trashy as I get.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you interesting in Olympics-related reading as we make our way through the final week of the Games, here are 4 books I've read on the topic over the past couple of weeks, utilizing the Kindle editions of all:

The Olympics' 50 Craziest Stories - Les Woodland

Very light read. A trivia book really. The Kindle edition was $3.99. I wouldn't pay any more than that, but given the price and that it took only 2-3 hours to read, it was fine.

The Naked Olympics: The True Story Of The Ancient Games - Tony Perottet

This one I really liked. Made it much easier for me to imagine what it was like for the ancients training, organizing, competing in, attending as spectators, partying at, and recovering from the 776BC-4th Century AD Olympics. Makes me want to go to Olympia some day and toe the starting line of the old stadium.

Inside The Olympics: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at the Politics, the Scandals and the Glory of the Games - Richard Pound

A long-time Canadian IOC member formerly in charge of revenue generating, and then head of the World Anti-Doping Agency, writes about doping, TV rights, judging, selecting host cities, sponsorships, etc. From 2004 so just a bit dated, and understandably he's more charitable towards than the IOC than I think this corrupt body deserves, but his opinions are not uncritical.

Striking Back:The 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre and Israel's Deadly Response - Aaron Klein

Very interesting book. It is really a travesty that the Opening Ceremonies' party couldn't be interrupted for one minute for a moment of silence to mark the 40th anniversary of this massacre that is fading from empty. Thankfully NBC's Bob Costas and CBC's Brian Williams, among others, made a point of mentioning it, IOC be damned. The first half of the book is about the 1972 events which no surprise paints the West German authorities as having totally bungled it. The next half is devoted to how, in the aftermath, assassination of suspected terrorists became a key component of Israeli intelligence policy for good or for bad.

Edited by lordstanley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just picked up a copy of I, Claudius by Robert Graves from the library. I've only just started it, but am already wondering what I got myself into. One of my brothers recommended it when he noticed I was reading Storming the Heavens... which is quite good, btw, if you're interested in the history of the Roman army (it's nonfiction).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got through devouring Charlie Leduff's new book "Detroit: An American Autopsy".

Holy crap. If even half of what he wrote is the truth, Detroit is in even worse shape than I had thought.

I highly recommend it.

51puxHKg6WL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently enjoying the heck out of this sci-fi novel:

51pP1iIaKYL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-66,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

I'm a sucker for alien invasion/apocalyptic novels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out 'The Passage' if you haven't already. Reading the uncut version of 'The Stand' right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Check out 'The Passage' if you haven't already. Reading the uncut version of 'The Stand' right now.

I just finished "The Twelve" by Cronin a few weeks ago. Love the series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well...I just read a book from 1997 (a little behind in my reading)...

True Crime, The Novel by Andrew Klavan...

I honestly could not put the book down and had to read into the wee hours of the night...

I think I will get some more of Klavan's books, but I doubt they could be this good...

486486.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just finished "The Twelve" by Cronin a few weeks ago. Love the series.

I just got 'The Twelve' last night, and it will be next.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently read The Corleone Family by Ed Falco. This is a prequel based on the screen plays, not the Godfather novel. The book takes place in the early to mid 1930's. Luca Brasi is the star of this book as far as I'm concerned. I'll leave it there so I don't spoil anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished "Joyland" by SK. It was kinda' "meh".

I'm in the middle of several books right now but Elizabeth Strout's "Burgess Boys" is really good.

What's everybody else reading at the moment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the past week I finished Stephen King's 11/22/63 and Peter Maas's Serpico.

I enjoyed 11/22/63 although he could have ended it around 750 pages and I was slightly disappointed in Serpico as I thought the corruption in the NYPD would have been more detailed.

This week I am reading Johnny got his gun by Dalton Trumbo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the past month and half, I have completed Bernard Cornwell's Grail Quest series - "The Archer's Tale", "Vagabond", "Heretic". Really cool historical fiction set during the Hundred Years war. Currently reading "1356", same main character, 10 years later. A new favourite author.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished Dust, the third book in the Wool trilogy. It's a really good series and each book opens up more and more of the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last two books I read were:

Quiet: The Power of Introversion in a World that Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain, and Longbourn by Jo Baker. I think the first one has been mentioned a fair amount here. The second is Pride and Prejudice from the servants' point of view. Both were very interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may have mentioned this in another thread......reading a book written by another pilot from my unit on my first tour flying hueys. We were there for about 6 months at the same time. It is not written as a novel, but it seems to be. I would recommend the book for excitement and most of us lived a little bit of what he wrote about. But not as often and without the heroics. I know or knew most of the pilots and crew he wrote about. There are some basic incorrect procedures written as miraculous, yet would have gotten the crew killed if it was attempted. Makes it hard to continue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently reading Larry Sabato's new book on JFK. It rehashes a lot of what we already know and takes a critical look at the Warren Report without subscribing to conspiracy theories. It also looks at the Kennedy legacy and how it has influenced the subsequent administrations since 1960.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got through with "Middlesex" by Jeffrey Eugenides.

Eugenides is a Former Detroiter and half this novel is set in Detroit.

This book won a Pulitzer and had gobs of rave reviews(gulp...was even an Oprah Bookclub selection), and I did enjoy the book...yet, there were some glaring errors that a Detroiter should never have made. In a diner, the owner had an autographed picture of "the great Detroit Tiger first baseman Al Kaline". This part was set in the 1950's and the only time Kaline was at first was when he got a single or a walk. That really annoyed me.

Also, in a scene from 1975, there was a car chase where the one guy was trying to get across the Ambassador bridge to get to Windsor, with their "casinos". As far as I know, I don't believe they had a casino until the 90's.

The final error (I was listening to the audiobook), the narrator kept pronouncing Gratiot as "Gray-Tea-ut" avenue.

Now, maybe this was the narrator's error and not the way Eugenides meant it to be pronounced, yet this should've been caught. Makes me wonder how much more was wrong that I didn't catch.

Again, this book was enjoyable--and very weird/funny in parts--but those mistakes "took me out of the book". But everytime I thought about stopping the book, I kept wondering about what would happen next.

So, I guess I would recommend the book based on that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just got through with "Middlesex" by Jeffrey Eugenides.

Eugenides is a Former Detroiter and half this novel is set in Detroit.

This book won a Pulitzer and had gobs of rave reviews(gulp...was even an Oprah Bookclub selection), and I did enjoy the book...yet, there were some glaring errors that a Detroiter should never have made. In a diner, the owner had an autographed picture of "the great Detroit Tiger first baseman Al Kaline". This part was set in the 1950's and the only time Kaline was at first was when he got a single or a walk. That really annoyed me.

Also, in a scene from 1975, there was a car chase where the one guy was trying to get across the Ambassador bridge to get to Windsor, with their "casinos". As far as I know, I don't believe they had a casino until the 90's.

The final error (I was listening to the audiobook), the narrator kept pronouncing Gratiot as "Gray-Tea-ut" avenue.

Now, maybe this was the narrator's error and not the way Eugenides meant it to be pronounced, yet this should've been caught. Makes me wonder how much more was wrong that I didn't catch.

Again, this book was enjoyable--and very weird/funny in parts--but those mistakes "took me out of the book". But everytime I thought about stopping the book, I kept wondering about what would happen next.

So, I guess I would recommend the book based on that.

Haha - pretty bad. Of course Al did play a little 1st in the last couple years of his career, but that sort of makes the error even worse. If the person had looked it up, they would have gotten it right, but this is an error where maybe somebody listened to one baseball game in 1973 and then thought they knew something about the team.

And again on the gampling, Windsor did have the 'Elmwood Casino' back in the 50's-70's, but there was no gambling there!

Back in the Bill Bonds days channel 7 news used to run a commercial implying the competition's newcasters were outside imports - they used a clip of a faux anchorperson saying 'Gra-tee-ot' Blvd as they read a story......So I guess 'Gratiot' is our local version of 'Shiboleth', but for west-siders the real mark was if you pronounced 'Lahser' as 'Lasher' even once you knew it wasn't spelled that way.

Edited by Gehringer_2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Michigan Sports Betting Offer

Michigan is launching online sports betting and casino apps on Friday, January 22, 2021. These top Michigan sportsbooks have pre-launch bonus offers. No deposit is required. Terms and conditions apply.

BetRivers Michigan - If you sign up at BetRivers Michigan now, you will receive $50 in free bets to use one their online sportsbook & casino

Click Here to claim $50 at BetRivers Michigan For Signing Up Now

FanDuel Michigan - If you register now before FanDuel launches in January, you will receive $100 to use at their sportsbook app & online casino.

Click Here to claim $100 at FanDuel Michigan For Registering Now

BetMGM Michigan - If you sign up early at BetMGM Michigan before launch, you will receive $200 in free bets to use at their online casino & sportsbook

Click Here to claim $200 at BetRivers Michigan For Signing Up Early

   


×
×
  • Create New...