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Just started "The Machine" about the '75 Reds by Joe Posnanski.

Am also in the middle of "The Age of Wonder" by Richard Holmes - very good read if you enjoy scientific/exploration history. This one covers a thread from Joseph Banks, through Herschel, Davy, to Charles Darwin. BST might like this especially.

...and eagerly awaiting the latest Jeff Shaara's historical war novel:

"No Less Than Victory" - his 3rd WWII book, this one from the Battle of the Bulge until the VE day.

I also am in the middle of "The Machine"

Pretty good stuff.

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In the last year, I have read mostly books by Orson Scott Card. I have read:

Ender's Game

Speaker for the Dead

Xenocide

Children of the Mind

Ender's shadow

Shadow of the Hegemon

They were all pretty good. Ender's Game was great.

I have recently bought new copies of a couple classics by Dumas, but have been consumed with my preliminary exams and likely will not have the time to read anything not related to chemistry or engineering until January.

Awesome books. I read them when I was high school and I loved them. Ender's Game is one of my favorite books of all-time, I read it in 7th grade. As for the Bean series (shadow books), you should read Shadow Puppets and Shadow of the Giant, they are both really good books too.

As for Speaker for the Dead and Xenocide, I thought they were both a little slow, but I loved the whole series overall.

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As for Speaker for the Dead and Xenocide, I thought they were both a little slow, but I loved the whole series overall.

I agree. I think I got kind of Carded out by that time.

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I read lots and lots of SF in the 50's, 60's, and 70's, but by about 1980 I stopped reading it much. It seemed at the time as if fantasy had taken over the SF genre, and I don't like fantasy.

About 2 years ago, I decided to get back into SF, and used the Hugo and Nebula awards as a resource for finding authors. Any recommendations from SF readers out there will be appreciated.

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If you want to get into a really good, really long, ongoing space opera, check out the Honor Harrington series by David Weber.

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I love the long series type of book but sometimes you get cheated.

Robert Jordan carried the "Wheel of Time" series out so long that he died before he got to finish it. Even though they have another author finishing the series, I feel cheated.

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I read lots and lots of SF in the 50's, 60's, and 70's, but by about 1980 I stopped reading it much. It seemed at the time as if fantasy had taken over the SF genre, and I don't like fantasy.

About 2 years ago, I decided to get back into SF, and used the Hugo and Nebula awards as a resource for finding authors. Any recommendations from SF readers out there will be appreciated.

My main suggestion would be Philip K. Dick but I imagine you have read him already.

The Man in the High Castle was a novel I enjoyed, set in an America where the Axis won WWII. The Penultimate Truth is another good one. His Do Androids Dream of Electric Sleep? inspired the movie Blade Runner. His book A Scanner Darkly was recently made into a movie with Keanu Reaves and Winona Ryder.

Valis was also rather good but you'd really have to be a fan to go through it.. it's largely autobiographical, about his paranoid schizophrenia and complicated religious beliefs.

I've been told that The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch is a really good book as well and have been meaning to read my copy of Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said.

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I just finished the book "Love is a Mix Tape" by Rob Sheffield, a contributing editor for Rolling Stone. It's the story of how he grew up loving music, how he met his wife, how she died and how he used music to mourn and celebrate her. Sentimental without being sappy. Loved it.

I read this a few months ago and found his song lists for his tapes very fascinating and nostalgic. The lists reminded me of mix tapes I used to make back in HS and mix CDs I used to make in college. Some of the stories behind them were also very touching, particularly the ones about his departed wife.

I've been sort of all over the map this year. I started it by reading The Revolution: A Manifesto by Ron Paul and The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History by Thomas Woods. Lately, despite my initial reservations in the whole series, I decided to pick up the Harry Potter series. I'm now obsessed with them. They are much better than I thought.

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I love the long series type of book but sometimes you get cheated.

Robert Jordan carried the "Wheel of Time" series out so long that he died before he got to finish it. Even though they have another author finishing the series, I feel cheated.

I started reading these when I was in the Marine Corps. There was so much time in between books, that I would have to re read the series every time a new one came out. I decided that I was going to wait until the series was complete before I re read it again. I am still waiting. I think that I am going to have to make flowcharts or something this time around to be able to follow the multiple storylines. I wonder if they will ever converge.

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Even though they have another author finishing the series, I feel cheated.

George RR Martin is pulling the same crap. 1/2 a book since A Storm of Swords came out in 2000; and that book didn't even include most of the characters I really cared about.

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Just finished Dark of the Moon by John Sandford. This is a crime fiction novel by the author who has written a series of novels with "Prey" in the title. Those novels, like this one, feature a protagonist who works for the (I assume mythical) Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. Not sure why he changed to a new hero, but maybe he thought the guy in the Prey novels, Lucas Davenport, was getting too old.

Sandford is an accomplished writer, and his stuff is well plotted and easy to read. His dialog is breezy, sometimes witty, the characters interesting, and the novels feature the requisite amount of sex and violence. This is not serious fiction, it won't make you ponder the human condition, but it will entertain. I've read most of his stuff, and I would recommend it to anyone who likes this type of fiction.

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Just finished rereading Siddhartha by Hesse. Now working on Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Friere.

"Siddhartha", I read that a few years back and really enjoyed it. Have you read "The Alchemist" by Paulo Coelho? If not, you might find it to your liking.

Trying to finish up two books at once. "Thursday Next: First Among Sequels" by Jasper FForde (he's as close as I'll come to Dougas Adams' humorous writing, R.I.P.) and "Netherland" by Joseph O'Neill; it's taking me awhile to get through this one.

Also recently purchased "Kitchen Confidential" Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly" by Anthony Bourdain. Should be a good snark-filled read; trying not to open this one up until I have wrapped up the above two.

Of what I have read so far above, I have enjoyed them all. I'm not a book critic so if I've piqued your interest you may want to pop over to Barnes and Noble or Amazon to see what they are all about.

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"Siddhartha", I read that a few years back and really enjoyed it. Have you read "The Alchemist" by Paulo Coelho? If not, you might find it to your liking.

Trying to finish up two books at once. "Thursday Next: First Among Sequels" by Jasper FForde (he's as close as I'll come to Dougas Adams' humorous writing, R.I.P.) and "Netherland" by Joseph O'Neill; it's taking me awhile to get through this one.

Also recently purchased "Kitchen Confidential" Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly" by Anthony Bourdain. Should be a good snark-filled read; trying not to open this one up until I have wrapped up the above two.

Of what I have read so far above, I have enjoyed them all. I'm not a book critic so if I've piqued your interest you may want to pop over to Barnes and Noble or Amazon to see what they are all about.

Not read The Alchemist. I'll investigate. I just spent much of 2 days reading philosophy papers so tonight may be all TV.

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I just finished a science fiction book by Neal Asher called Gridlinked. This is Asher's first novel, with a copyright date of 2001.

Reading Asher seems like a throwback to SF from the fifties, with simple FTL travel and scores of worlds where humans flourish in a kind of wild west environment on the edge of civilized space. There aren't many cute aliens in his novels, but the few aliens he does write about are inscrutable and deadly. His villains are mostly sociopaths and there is lots and lots of mayhem.

He is a good story teller, and unlike a lot of SF writers, he doesn't spend a few hundred pages leisurely describing his universe. He gets to the plot right away, so the story progresses quickly and efficiently. I enjoy reading Asher and would recommend this novel to anyone who likes science fiction.

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Lately I've been reading quite a few Lee Child books, I've also read pretty much all the Grisham books. But I would suggest the earlier Child books, I believe they are making one of his books into a motion picture coming out next year. All of them are based off of the same character.

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Lately I've been reading quite a few Lee Child books, I've also read pretty much all the Grisham books. But I would suggest the earlier Child books, I believe they are making one of his books into a motion picture coming out next year. All of them are based off of the same character.

Yeah. My girlfriend loves the Lee Child Books.

The character is called Jack Reacher?

I'm going to start one of those soon.

I'm reading "Drood" by Dan Simmons now.

Good time of the year to catch up on reading now that Satan has prevailed in Minnesota.

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Lately I've been reading quite a few Lee Child books, I've also read pretty much all the Grisham books. But I would suggest the earlier Child books, I believe they are making one of his books into a motion picture coming out next year. All of them are based off of the same character.

Lee Child's Jack Reacher books are good reading. Pure escapist, big badass, help the little guy, loves guns and fighting, implausable hero.

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Y'know, I just picked up Fever Pitch for the first time in absolutely years last night - Nick Hornby's classic football biog about his affair with Arsenal.

Just blown away by how utterly brilliant it is - and how, in the shiny Premiership era, it's so totally different to any of the values surrounding football these days.

I have no idea if this took off in anything other than soccer circles in the States. But it's fabby :-)

In the US, it was made into a cheesy movie about baseball that I refused to see. Those who know me and who know about the movie won't be surprised by that.:wink:

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Most of the books I read are mysteries, usually by Carole Nelson Douglas, Joanna Carl, and Rita Mae Brown. RMB has been irking me lately though with way too much political commentary and some bashing of New Englanders (but I do like the info she gives on horses and fox hunting).

They're mostly books that women and/or animal lovers would like, though. Joanna Carl's especially, but I like the description of the various types of chocolate and the chocolate trivia throughout (it's set in MI, incidentally).

My favorite books of all time are Bumblebee Economics and Pesticides and the Living Landscape, so if anybody knows of any similar books I'd appreciate recommendations.

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In the US, it was made into a cheesy movie about baseball that I refused to see. Those who know me and who know about the movie won't be surprised by that.:wink:

There was a pretty cheesy British movie made from the same book (it was about soccer starring Colin Firth)

194980.jpg

I will turn in my man card now:cheeky:

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In the US, it was made into a cheesy movie about baseball that I refused to see. Those who know me and who know about the movie won't be surprised by that.:wink:
There was a pretty cheesy British movie made from the same book (it was about soccer starring Colin Firth)

194980.jpg

I will turn in my man card now:cheeky:

I think I must have seen the movie - I think they made some quite nice use of music (a touch of Van Morrison at one point iirc...)

I saw the one-man play version of it as well - actually rather good.

Hornby novels clearly suffer from being adapted too much for film. I actually picked up High Fidelity t'other day and realised, again, how much of a bloody brilliant writer he is (certainly in the early stuff).

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Most of the books I read are mysteries, usually by Carole Nelson Douglas, Joanna Carl, and Rita Mae Brown. RMB has been irking me lately though with way too much political commentary and some bashing of New Englanders (but I do like the info she gives on horses and fox hunting).

Tried any of the Walender novels - Hennig Mankel's take on Swedish detectivism. Worth a go if you can get hold of them relatively easily.

Oh, and I quite like some of the Inspector Chen stuff as well.

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