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Worst Ever Tigers Trade

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April 1, 2004 -- Possibly the worst day in American history. I remember it like it was yesterday...Storm clouds gathered, the temperature dropped 20 degrees and the Tigers announced they had traded Cody Ross for left-handed flame thrower Steve Colyer. A mere five years later, the economy collapses.

I remember it well. Does anybody remember this fine thread?

http://www.motownsports.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25032

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How about the one he didn't pull off: Encarnacion for Bernie Williams? Had it set and screwed it up.

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November 10, 1948: Billy Pierce was traded by the Detroit Tigers with $10,000 to the Chicago White Sox for Aaron Robinson.

:wink:

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How about the one he didn't pull off: Encarnacion for Bernie Williams? Had it set and screwed it up.
Was that Juan E. or was it Higgy?

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Was that Juan E. or was it Higgy?

He's got several like that. The actual trade you guys are talking about, which he had on a napkin, was Mike Drumright and Roberto Duran for Bernie Williams. There was also something for Todd Helton, and he nearly landed Andruw Jones for Brian L. Hunter and Todd Jones, but it was nixed by Atlanta's GM (Schuerholtz?) at the last minute.

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When it was all said and done, we traded Cecil Fielder and Travis Fryman for Matt Drews.

Randy also allegedly had Juan all set to go to NY if he could agree on a contract with the Yankees. We would have gotten.... Drew Henson. The Yanks wanted us to take Soriano but we had Damian Easley, we didn't need a 2B. We needed a 3B.

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When it was all said and done, we traded Cecil Fielder and Travis Fryman for Matt Drews.

Randy also allegedly had Juan all set to go to NY if he could agree on a contract with the Yankees. We would have gotten.... Drew Henson. The Yanks wanted us to take Soriano but we had Damian Easley, we didn't need a 2B. We needed a 3B.

I thought Fielder got traded to the Yankees for Ruben Sierra & Drews, and Fryman was traded to the Diamondbacks, before getting flipped to the Indians.

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1928 - Despite being successful in the minors, the Tigers released Carl Hubbell. He then went on to have a 15 year HOF career with the NY Giants.

:alien:

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Trading Ron LeFlore for Dan Schatzader (sp?) was pretty bad. At the time, LeFlore was a star, and Schatzy was schitty.

The worst, though, has to be the Gonzalez trade, simply because anyone with half a brain could see beforehand that it wasn't going to work out. Gonzalez was a complete stat whore in the last year of his contract, and bringing him into a ballpark which was the worst at the time for righty home run hitters was a stupid, stupid move. You knew he was going to bolt the minute he got the chance.

It doesn't matter whether or not the players we traded for him became All-Stars; you have to evaluate trades by where the players were at the time the deal was done. And JT, Kapler, Cordero and the Cat were all highly-regarded players in the winter of 2000.

That's why I don't call the Smoltz deal anywhere near the worst. At the time, Smoltz was struggling in the low minors, and Doyle Alexander was a seasoned, dependable starting pitcher -- exactly what we needed. Nobody knew he was going to win 100 games in a row like he did, but Doyle had been a very decent pitcher up to then, and getting a guy of that caliber for an unknown pitcher in the low minors was a coup.

The Gonzalez deal was the worst.

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Worst trade that wasn't a trade (personnel decision) was to return Maury Wills to the Dodgers. Make him the SS and leadoff guy in the 1960's. That may have gotten them that one more game in 1967.
1928 - Despite being successful in the minors, the Tigers released Carl Hubbell. He then went on to have a 15 year HOF career with the NY Giants.

For non trades / personnel moves, these are probably the two worst in Tiger history. The Hubbell move was the worst of the two, IMO, because Carl was the more effective player.

The Tigers released Carl because Ty Cobb forbade Carl from throwing the screwball for fear of hurting his arm sometime in 1926, and without that pitch Carl wasn't effective. When McGraw got hold of Carl, John basically recognized that Hubbell needed the screwball to be effective, and if that meant Hubbell became injured in two years, well, two years of effective pitching is better than nothing. As it turned out, King Carl had an amazing 10-year run with the screwball, and a pretty effective 5-year stretch as a spot starter after that.

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Trading Ron LeFlore for Dan Schatzader (sp?) was pretty bad. At the time, LeFlore was a star, and Schatzy was schitty.
Did the Tigers know that LeFlore had some "issues" though? Maybe they were trying trying to unload him in a hurry, but that's just speculation. One must note that LeFlore was out of baseball within 3 years, due to his drug usage. And other than his 97 steals, his Montreal numbers are actually quite poor, so he only lasted one year there.

As for Schatzie, he had very good numbers in 1978 and 1979, and really his first year with the Tigers wasn't bad. But the wheels sure did come off in '81.

Also, the Tigers did manage to trade him for Larry Herndon.

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I thought Fielder got traded to the Yankees for Ruben Sierra & Drews, and Fryman was traded to the Diamondbacks, before getting flipped to the Indians.

He did. Drews was taken by AZ in the expansion draft so we traded Fryman to AZ, to get Drews back, and then Fryman was sent to Cleveland.

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Did the Tigers know that LeFlore had some "issues" though? Maybe they were trying trying to unload him in a hurry, but that's just speculation. One must note that LeFlore was out of baseball within 3 years, due to his drug usage. And other than his 97 steals, his Montreal numbers are actually quite poor, so he only lasted one year there.

As for Schatzie, he had very good numbers in 1978 and 1979, and really his first year with the Tigers wasn't bad. But the wheels sure did come off in '81.

Also, the Tigers did manage to trade him for Larry Herndon.

Good point on the degree of separation between LeFlore and Herndon. In the long run, we made it pay off.

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He did. Drews was taken by AZ in the expansion draft so we traded Fryman to AZ, to get Drews back, and then Fryman was sent to Cleveland.

Yeah, Alvarez was the centerpiece prospect in the Fryman deal I think. That deal was tough because Fryman was pretty much the only prospect the Tigers developed during the late 80s/early 90s. So if Tram, Lou and Gibson were a little before your time, the odds were pretty good Travis Fryman was your favorite player.

-Tony

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Trading Ron LeFlore for Dan Schatzader (sp?) was pretty bad. At the time, LeFlore was a star, and Schatzy was schitty.

I didn't like the trade either but Schatzy was not a bad pitcher. He was a young pitcher coming off two successful seasons when they made the trade. He had only one decent season with the Tigers. Then he went on to have a successful career as a reliever. And Leflore was not exactly a stellar performer after leaving the Tigers. It wasn't a good trade but I don't think it belongs on the list of worst ever trades.

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Worst Trade Ever:

1927: Heinie Manush and Lou Blue to St. Louis Browns, for Harry Rice, Elam Vangilder, and Chick Galloway.

Manush would have TEN MORE seasons of batting .300 or better, after leaving the Tigers. Ouch.

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Not quite as bad, but Ron LeFlore for Dan Shatzader was pretty bad.

But just think of the trade the Tigers almost pulled off prior to the 1907 season: Ty Cobb to Cleveland for Elmer Flick, straight up. Flick was a good player, but was at the tail-end of his career, while Cobb was just starting his.

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Did the Tigers know that LeFlore had some "issues" though? Maybe they were trying trying to unload him in a hurry, but that's just speculation.
LeFlore was traded from Detroit because of Sparky's rule "My way or the highway" and LeFlore was not fond of Sparky's way.

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I have to agree about the Billy Pierce for Aaron Robinson and cash as being the worst ever Tigers trade. What is forgotten is that the Tigers would have won the 1950 pennant if Robinson wouldn't have pulled his "bonehead" play.

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Worst trade that wasn't a trade (personnel decision) was to return Maury Wills to the Dodgers. Make him the SS and leadoff guy in the 1960's. That may have gotten them that one more game in 1967.

Wow. I think myself a pretty literate Tigers fan. But I had no idea that Wills had spent so much as a day in spring training in a Tigers uniform. I love this board....

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I have to agree about the Billy Pierce for Aaron Robinson and cash as being the worst ever Tigers trade. What is forgotten is that the Tigers would have won the 1950 pennant if Robinson wouldn't have pulled his "bonehead" play.

And YOU would know!!!

Since Johnny Groth was ON that team!!!

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I wonder where the Jair Jurjjens trade will end up on this list when it's all said and done? At least we got a division title out of trading Smoltz.

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I don't think I've ever seen a good reason why the Smoltz-Alexander trade was a bad one for the Tigers. It simply cannot be measured using hindsight.

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It wasn't a bad trade from the standpoint of it being a stupid thing to do. Nine out of ten general managers would make the same trade today, knowing what was known in 1987.

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