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Corky

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Thought I'd share one of my favorite Youtube channels. 

Rick Beato is a producer, musician, and teacher. He has a ton of videos breaking down theory, recording techniques, etc. If you have a question about something, chances are her answers it here. And if not, he does a lot of live Q&A also. 

One series he does is called "What Makes This Song Great?" where he picks a song and breaks down each instrument, goes over theory, gives random facts, etc. They're usually around 15 minutes long. Pretty fun to watch. 

https://www.youtube.com/user/pegzch/videos

 

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On 12/28/2018 at 9:10 AM, Euphdude said:

The young mind is a beautiful thing.

Our musical director at church has that sort of talent. Plays at least 7 instruments. 

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On 12/27/2018 at 11:00 PM, Yoda said:

As an aside, the stuff his kid does creeps me the **** out. 

 

Pretty impressive what a human can do. Went to grade school and Jr High with a kid that had some of this, but it was pulling teeth to get him to do a demo so it was hard to know exactly what he could do when he was willing. Just fooling around with us friends he could give you the note or chord on the piano with his back turned but he pretty much refused to show off for any teacher in school that asked him. Sad/funny thing is I think he became a fundamentalist preacher rather than sticking with music.

 

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A needlessly random rant: 

On the subject of flats and sharps, why do they both exist when it comes to the names of notes? For instance, D sharp is the same damn note as E flat. Why do they both exist? Just get rid of the flats. A, A sharp, B, C, C sharp, D, D sharp, E, F, F sharp, G, G sharp. That's all we need. I can't fathom how the guy creating this system didn't just nix one of them. 

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22 minutes ago, Yoda said:

A needlessly random rant: 

On the subject of flats and sharps, why do they both exist when it comes to the names of notes? For instance, D sharp is the same damn note as E flat. Why do they both exist? Just get rid of the flats. A, A sharp, B, C, C sharp, D, D sharp, E, F, F sharp, G, G sharp. That's all we need. I can't fathom how the guy creating this system didn't just nix one of them. 

Maybe it's so you don't have the same named note twice in any scale? (or alternately, so every note name appears once and only once in every scale). For instance, if you did away with sharps, there were be two 'G's and no F in the key of G major - you'd have both G and G flat instead of F sharp and G. Or with no flats in the Key of Fmaj it would go F, G, A, A#,C,D,E.  IDK - which is weirder - having two notation types or having all the scales have a different set of base notes?

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13 hours ago, Yoda said:

A needlessly random rant: 

On the subject of flats and sharps, why do they both exist when it comes to the names of notes? For instance, D sharp is the same damn note as E flat. Why do they both exist? Just get rid of the flats. A, A sharp, B, C, C sharp, D, D sharp, E, F, F sharp, G, G sharp. That's all we need. I can't fathom how the guy creating this system didn't just nix one of them. 

 

I think it's because it's all relative to context of the key you are playing in.    Take for example, the C major scale.   C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C.    If you wanted to convert that to the natural minor, you flatten the 3rd, 6th and 7th degrees of the scale.  It becomes C-D-Eb-F-G-Ab-Bb-C. So, take for example the third degree of the scale, the E gets flattened and becomes an Eb.   The Eb replaces the E in the scale.  It's not replacing D, therefore we are not sharpening the D, we are flattening the E.

At least that's how I've always thought of it.  sharps and flats are relative to the notes they are replacing.

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It’s also relative to the instrument being played. A# and B flat may sound the same on a guitar, piano or other “modern.” Instruments but there is a subtle difference between the two on say a viola or violin or even a trombone 

I realize it’s a pain for trust me as I tend to switch from a b flat tenor sax to an e flat alto on a regular bases. Same music at times different keys anything above four flats or sharps drives me nuts at time.

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1 hour ago, CMRivdog said:

It’s also relative to the instrument being played. A# and B flat may sound the same on a guitar, piano or other “modern.” Instruments but there is a subtle difference between the two on say a viola or violin or even a trombone 

I realize it’s a pain for trust me as I tend to switch from a b flat tenor sax to an e flat alto on a regular bases. Same music at times different keys anything above four flats or sharps drives me nuts at time.

In at least one sense, it has been instrument technology that has driven the whole tuning system. The old string instruments you could do pretty much what ever you wanted to with tuning, but once they started building pipe organs in Europe, they had to have a system that could play all the keys on a single chromatic system - you can't change the pipes between numbers! So the  tuning system we use  was lobbied for and popularized by guys like JS Bach.

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Something I read said that the major scale is supposed to contain one note from each "letter", so if you didn't have the alternatives there would be skips in the major scale.

I think that's also why sites like this have C## and F## in the D# scale

https://www.basicmusictheory.com/d-sharp-major-scale

Quote
D-sharp major scale note names
Note no. Note interval Note name
1 tonic The 1st note of the D-sharp major scale is D#
2 D#-maj-2nd The 2nd note of the D-sharp major scale is E#
3 D#-maj-3rd The 3rd note of the D-sharp major scale is F##
4 D#-perf-4th The 4th note of the D-sharp major scale is G#
5 D#-perf-5th The 5th note of the D-sharp major scale is A#
6 D#-maj-6th The 6th note of the D-sharp major scale is B#
7 D#-maj-7th The 7th note of the D-sharp major scale is C##
8 D#-perf-8th The 8th note of the D-sharp major scale is D#

 

I suspect it's all about reading music, specifically around the use of the key signatures and the shapening and flattening of notes while sight reading.  Maybe I'd understand why a bit better if I were much much better at reading music but I never do it.

 

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Scales like D# are easier to read and write for as Eb, which is the enharmonic equivalent and has three flats instead of six (I think) sharps. 

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I briefly took an introduction to improvision class at Schoolcraft. It was like trying to learn a foreign language.

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12 hours ago, CMRivdog said:

I briefly took an introduction to improvision class at Schoolcraft. It was like trying to learn a foreign language.

I've taken lessons on musical improv and they were all very heavy on theory to the point of being intimidating.  It's easiest to improv over a pentatonic scale, and even that requires a ton of practice to do well.

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On 1/1/2019 at 12:14 PM, Yoda said:

I still think we need to form a motown virtual band. 

Thats a really good idea.  Something where a bunch of us collaborate parts of a recording and upload our parts somewhere?

I haven't been a regular poster on here in many years unfortunately so I'm not sure if I'd be considered a part of the band but either way there's enough of of us here that we could collaborate online as long as everyone has a decent recording rig.

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There's an app called Acapella that I've used to record parts separately, and it's worked well.  Granted I've only used it for brass work, but I'm sure it would work well for strings and percussion as well.

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So I bought a ridiculously expensive gretsch.   I'm not sure I'm totally sold on it.  I'm not sure why.   I think one thing is that it has 11s on it, which takes some getting used to.   I'm also just not sure it's worth the money I spend on it, and I got a fab deal on it.   I've only had it for a few days and need to run it through my good amps at rehearsal, but just not sure at this point.

I kinda think that at this price point, I need to love it the moment I start paying it (that's what happened with my Guild acoustic), and I'm not sure that's happening.  It is lifer-axe type of money.  I guess the good thing is that if I return it, I've already set the precendent of wasting a **** ton of money on an axe, so the wife shouldn't object next time either.  haha

 

 

 

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On 1/5/2019 at 9:27 AM, pfife said:

So I bought a ridiculously expensive gretsch.   I'm not sure I'm totally sold on it.  I'm not sure why.   I think one thing is that it has 11s on it, which takes some getting used to.   I'm also just not sure it's worth the money I spend on it, and I got a fab deal on it.   I've only had it for a few days and need to run it through my good amps at rehearsal, but just not sure at this point.

I kinda think that at this price point, I need to love it the moment I start paying it (that's what happened with my Guild acoustic), and I'm not sure that's happening.  It is lifer-axe type of money.  I guess the good thing is that if I return it, I've already set the precendent of wasting a **** ton of money on an axe, so the wife shouldn't object next time either.  haha

 

 

 

Ouch. Ever tried a high end SG? Fantastic instruments. 

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On 12/31/2018 at 7:00 PM, CMRivdog said:

It’s also relative to the instrument being played. A# and B flat may sound the same on a guitar, piano or other “modern.” Instruments but there is a subtle difference between the two on say a viola or violin or even a trombone 

I realize it’s a pain for trust me as I tend to switch from a b flat tenor sax to an e flat alto on a regular bases. Same music at times different keys anything above four flats or sharps drives me nuts at time.

Along this line, I was just talking to an experienced choir director whose has worked a lot in pre-baroque music and I asked her about it.  She told me that in some of the earlier tuning schemes an F# and Gb are not the same note and that pre-"well-tempered" scheme choral music notes may be intended to be sung to quarter tones.

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11 hours ago, Biff Mayhem said:

Ouch. Ever tried a high end SG? Fantastic instruments. 

I'm starting to warm up to it a bit more since posting.  I think much of it is revolving around growing accustomed to 11s.

 

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