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DennisDubay

Deep Frying a turkey.

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Question for all you cooks. Who here has deep fryed a turkey? We are having Thanksgiving dinner at our house this year, and in an effort to stay outside away from the family, I'd like to deep fry a turkey. Is it difficult? What types of instruments of frying do I need to purchase? Should I up my life insurance and property insurance? Have Firefighters on stand by?

Seriously, is it worth the trouble? I've never ate a deep fryed turkey before.

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It is worth the trouble. The biggest danger is that once you eat fried turkey you'll never want the other kind again.

Get a turkey frying kit from a camping place or sporting goods store. The key thing is to measure the oil properly. Put the turkey in the pot as you would if you were cooking it then pour water in it and mark somehow. That's your level. People will fill the thing with oil, then when they put the turkey in, they forget that whole "displacement" thing they learned in elementary science class. Not good with hot oil. That's how fires get started.

Look around on the net for other tips. I want to get a kit for my birthday.

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If you don't burn it, it's delicious. The trick is to maintain the temperature at 350 or 375 degrees (I forget which), because the peanut oil will get much hotter than that if not maintained with a thermometer. If someone is allergic to peanuts, get a different oil with a very high flash point or the oil will burn. Do it out of doors. Make sure the fryer is on a level surface. Put cardboard around the fryer, but not underneath the legs (see level surface direction above). Have a fire extinguisher handy, for the worst case scenario. Have some kitty litter or oil-dry ready, for oil spills. And last, but not least -- put the turkey in the fryer pot, fill the fryer pot with water to the level needed to submerge the bird completely, remove the bird, and then mark the water line. Now you know how much oil to use.

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Ob:

Do you have any recommendations on a frying kit? Kits' you've used in the past?

The kits are basically a propane burner on a stand with an enormous stock pot that sets on it. As with all propane burning devices, I recommend the Coleman brand, but all that I've seen are essentially similar.

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The kits are basically a propane burner on a stand with an enormous stock pot that sets on it. As with all propane burning devices, I recommend the Coleman brand, but all that I've seen are essentially similar.

Thanks Shabba.

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i love deep fried Turkey... i bought my dad a deep fryer setup and he never uses it

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my dear departed friend "Litte Ron" used to say.

1. Thaw the bird, frozen does not do well with HOT oil.

2. Lower VERY slowly, even if it takes two people.

3. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMM Enjoy.

God Bless Ron, see ya on the other side.

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If you are careful it is wonderful.

If you are not careful your house will burn down.

It is easy to be careful - just get the right amount of oil!

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I repeat an earlier comment...thaw the bird! Deep frying is not a neat process Cook outside where you can place cardboard or a lot of paper. Buy a small bird. You are not going to put a 26# bird in your fryer.

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I repeat an earlier comment...thaw the bird! Deep frying is not a neat process Cook outside where you can place cardboard or a lot of paper. Buy a small bird. You are not going to put a 26# bird in your fryer.

Wasn't planning on a 26 pounder! It's usually a Turkey and Ham in these parts, so a 12 pounder will be the carcass of choice, I imagine.

But good tip, Sir Huey.

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We do this up north all the time. Outstanding taste.

Buy the spice injector kit for the bird as well.

I have a spice injector that we use when we bake the turkey. Pretty good instrument of taste for cheap.

Any good ideas on spices? I'd like some type of bacon spice, myself. Turkey and Bacon .. a flavor meant to be? :)

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When I work with fowl, I like to use cinnamon, allspice, sage, mace and I wish I knew whaT OTHERS AS MY KITCHEN IS STREWN OVER THREE ROOMS NOW. I'm not yelling, just misusing my laptop. Apple slices and celery tied inside also add to flavor..

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huey, that's a great point about thawing it. I forgot to say that. If you don't, then the extra moisture causes problems.

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I've been an Alton Brown fan for years and when it comes to turkey (which is probably my favorite food), he's got the best recipe I've come across.

Regardless of your cooking method (deep frying or oven), the real key to a moist turkey is brining. Seriously. I've been doing this for something like six years. Moist and flavorful. Can't miss.

Here is Brown's roast turkey recipe. Just follow the brining steps and then cook the bird however you prefer.

And if you really want to impress, try this recipe as an accent. It's become the most popular item on my Thanksgiving dinner table. I didn't make it one year and guests got mad. Really mad. I couldn't believe it. (Oddly enough, the same people that were skeptical about trying it have become its biggest proponents.) The sauce can be made a couple days ahead of time and reheated on Turkey Day too.

Both of these recipes stem from an episode of Good Eats that's due to air on November 8th. It's DVR-worthy for anyone interested in taking their Thanksgiving to the next level.

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1. Thaw the bird, frozen does not do well with HOT oil.

Or, buy it fresh, and avoid freezer burn and the injections. But, this is a most important safety tip, nonetheless.

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