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DTroppens

Ty Tyson broadcasts

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dt35456884 asked me about Ty Tyson broadcasts in another thread.

Without looking like I'm trying to do some advertising this is the easiest way for me to help everyone out for a very cheap price...

http://www.billsparks.com/Sports/Baseball/index.html

That website gets you to Billsparks radio baseball games. With the four MP3 set you get 78 games if I counted it right for a very cheap price.

However, if you jsutwwant to get disk one you will get two Tyson games at the start of that disk. One is the 9-20-34 game. It's kind of funny because he's the loudspeaker to the audience. But what I find interesting is you could listen to him today and he wouldn't stick out as being pathetic. He does an adequate job even at today's standards by himself as a pioneer in 1934. The fact he did it from 1927 until 1953 suggests how much people enjoyed his broadcasts as well. Ty Tyson was just as and maybe more of a celebrity to Detroit homes than Ernie Harwell. Certainly he was the only avenue to hear games for many people. From what I can hear he wasn't a homer. He was deliberate (kind of like Paul Carey) and a man of economic words. When the Tigers went to the World Series in 1934 Tyston was going to be prohibited to do any of the games but Tiger fans were outraged and 600,000 letters of protest came into his office. Landis allowed him to do the games on WWJ. In 1935 he was added to the NBC staff.

He may or may not be on more of those MP3 CDs but he's certainly on the first two. Give it a listen if you get a shot. The guy that owns the company isn't young in his years. You may want to get them before it's too late, to be blunt about it.

Also:

MLBs best has that game on audio.

A few other places sell it like Baseball direct.

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In the book Voices of Summer by Curt Smith, he ranks the greatest radio men in baseball history. The way he graded them is sketchy at best, but he gave it a whirl I guess. The guy also wrote a book about stadiums a few years back. I really wouldn't suggest any book to anyone unless they had about 30 others already. They are not fun reading becuase he essentially is out to impress people with his grasp of the English language (I've never read anyone that used the word thrice so many times). So often you find yourself in a fog wondering if he knows what he is even talking about (especially in his stadium book as the announcer one is better).

He has very few of the "pioneers" ranked very high and has Tyson only at 97th.

Here's what he said

Longevity: 7 (20 years)

Continuuity 9 (because with Tigers so long).

Network: 2 World Series 1935-36.

Kudos: 3 an annual award is given in his name.

Language: 6 slow - I put him at par with Carey here.

Popularity: 10 (he made it generational," Harwell said.

Persona: 8

Voice: 4 dry (No dryer than Bob Uecker and he also worked alone. Nothing to balance)

Knowledge: 9

Misc: 7 earliest reg season game existing.

Maybe being a pioneer in Detroit broadcast sports radio should've been worth more than a 7 in Misc or Kudos? I don't know. Maybe becoming the first TV voice meant something as well? I don't know. Maybe his longevity was hurt because by the time they started doing Tiger games in 1927, he was already 39. Doing it until 1953 suggests he was pretty darn good.

But again, I'm not going to rip the guy for his ratings. Doing that is a thankless job. And he did one thing right. He has Harwell No. 3. :classic:

P.S. He also did U-M football for a time.

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Winkepedia's post

Edwin L. "Ty" Tyson (May 11, 1888 – December 12, 1968) was an American sports broadcaster and radio play-by-play announcer. Born in Tyron, Pennsylvania, he attended Penn State University and was hired by WWJ radio station. In 1924, Ty Tyson called the first University of Michigan football game on radio. In 1927, he called the first Detroit Tigers radio broadcast from Navin Field. On Tigers broadcasts, Ty Tyson was joined by Harry Heilmann, who would later replace Tyson in 1943.

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GuyIncognito,

There are quite a few Kell games I had no clue existed there as well.

I have never gotten that 1934 World Series game. Until about a year ago (probably a bit longer than that) I never saw it offered anywhere. Now I see it offered. I'm going to have to think about getting that one soon from someone.

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Not to mention the earliest Ernie Harwell game I've come across so far: the 1958 All-Star Game in Baltimore (back when he was an Orioles broadcaster).

Ernie calls a Ted Williams hit in '58

Ernie did the TV coverage of the 1951 Shot Heard Around the World.

I don't know if a copy exists of that, but..

This link has the radio feed (if you have access) - Harwell did part of the post-game interviewing as well.

http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/baseballs_best/mlb_bb_gamepage.jsp?story_page=bb_51reg_100351_bknnyg

Go to about the 9:30 mark for Harwell & Hodges post game interviews. Not the best quality sound.

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I have tried to figure out games with Brooklyn that Ernie would've done but I have not been successful.

Ernie always talks about the shot. There is no footage of his call.

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I have tried to figure out games with Brooklyn that Ernie would've done but I have not been successful.

Ernie's first broadcast with the Dodgers came on August 4, 1948. He remained with them until the end of the 1949 season.

It would be great to hear Harwell and Red Barber working together. Unfortunately, I don't believe any of Ernie's games from that era were recorded for posterity.

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I wish Tyson's call of Goose Goslin's single to win the '35 Series was around somewhere - it must have been electric. Or newsreel video (like exists for Game 7 of the '34 Series). Or some great photos of the moment maybe?

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I wish Tyson's call of Goose Goslin's single to win the '35 Series was around somewhere - it must have been electric. Or newsreel video (like exists for Game 7 of the '34 Series). Or some great photos of the moment maybe?

People fall in love with Game #5 of the 1968 World Series or Game #7 of the 1968 World Series and love to say one of those two games is probably the top Tigers moment of all time.

I can't believe that's true. In 1935 the Tigers had lost four World Series and the city was stuck in the middle of a depression. This area needed something to feel good about (just as in 1968) and the Tigers win in the bottom of the ninth on what people like to call a walk off single these days (I really hate that term walk off) at home in front of 48,000+ fans and a ton of people clinging to everything about the game in a variety of ways. Sorry baby boomers, but it's hard to see how Game #6 of the 1935 World Series isn't No. 1.

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Sorry baby boomers, but it's hard to see how Game #6 of the 1935 World Series isn't No. 1.

Totally agree. Must have been quite the scene. Courtesy of the Detroit News, no game photos but of the celebratory aftermath that day and the next:

29.jpg

30.jpg

31.jpg

32.jpg

33.jpg

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