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The Bluhm Memorial Detroit Tigers Hall of Fame

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GEORGE MULLIN

Pitcher, 1902-1913

"Wabash George"

georgemullin1915.jpg

--Class of 1915--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 7/4/1880

Died - 1/7/1944

Biography:

Geography may have been the reason why George Mullin became one of the greatest pitchers in Detroit Tigers history. Mullin, who signed a contract with the Tigers and Brooklyn Dodgers, decided on the Tigers because Detroit was closer to his home in Indiana. "Wabash" George became one of the winningest pitcher in Tigers history, capturing 209 victories. Mullin was a 20-game winner five times in his career and tossed over 300 innings six times. In 1909 he posted a career-best 29 wins. He was 3-3 during Detroit’s three World Series appearances between 1907 and 1909, and never posted an ERA higher than 2.12 ERA during any of those series. On July 4, 1912 he celebrated his 32nd birthday by firing the first no-hitter in Detroit history. Mullin was inducted into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 1962.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1902 21 DET AL 13 16 35 30 25 0 4 0 260.0 282 155 106 4 95 78 7 13 1152 3.67 99 1.450
1903 22 DET AL 19 15 41 36 31 6 5 2 320.7 284 128 80 4 106 170 8 6 0 2.25 129 1.216
1904 23 DET AL 17 23 45 44 42 7 1 0 382.3 345 154 102 1 131 161 10 8 1597 2.40 106 1.245
1905 24 DET AL 21 21 44 41 35 1 2 0 347.7 303 149 97 4 138 168 9 6 1473 2.51 109 1.268
1906 25 DET AL 21 18 40 40 35 2 0 0 330.0 315 139 102 3 108 123 15 11 1408 2.78 100 1.282
1907 26 DET AL 20 20 46 42 35 5 4 3 357.3 346 153 103 1 106 146 15 6 1493 2.59 100 1.265
1908 27 DET AL 17 13 39 30 26 1 8 0 290.7 301 142 100 1 71 121 7 12 1232 3.10 78 1.280
1909 28 DET AL 29 8 40 35 29 3 5 1 303.7 258 96 75 1 78 124 8 5 1232 2.22 113 1.106
1910 29 DET AL 21 12 38 32 27 5 6 0 289.0 260 125 92 7 102 98 14 4 1181 2.87 91 1.253
1911 30 DET AL 18 10 30 29 25 2 1 0 234.3 245 99 80 7 61 87 12 5 995 3.07 113 1.306
1912 31 DET AL 12 17 30 29 22 2 0 0 226.0 214 112 89 3 92 88 9 3 968 3.54 92 1.354
1913 32 DET AL 1 6 7 7 4 0 0 0 52.3 53 28 16 1 18 16 2 1 228 2.75 106 1.357

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 12 1902 1913 209 179 .539 2.76 435 395 36 336 34 6 3394.0 3206 1480 1042 37 1106 1380 102

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1902 21 DET AL 40 120 20 39 4 3 0 11 1 8 .325 .367 .408 113 49 1 0
1903 22 DET AL 46 126 11 35 9 1 1 12 1 2 .278 .295 .389 106 49 4 1
1904 23 DET AL 53 155 14 45 10 2 0 8 1 10 .290 .337 .381 130 59 3 1
1905 24 DET AL 47 135 15 35 4 0 0 12 4 12 .259 .320 .289 93 39 3 0
1906 25 DET AL 50 142 13 32 6 4 0 6 2 4 .225 .247 .324 76 46 1 0
1907 26 DET AL 70 157 16 34 5 3 0 13 2 12 .217 .276 .287 77 45 0 1
1908 27 DET AL 55 125 13 32 2 2 1 8 2 7 .256 .306 .328 102 41 3 2
1909 28 DET AL 53 126 13 27 7 0 0 17 2 13 .214 .288 .270 73 34 2 0
1910 29 DET AL 50 129 15 33 6 2 1 11 1 8 .256 .299 .357 99 46 0 0
1911 30 DET AL 40 98 4 28 7 2 0 5 1 10 .286 .352 .398 105 39 1 0
1912 31 DET AL 38 90 13 25 5 1 0 12 0 17 .278 .393 .356 117 32 2 0
1913 32 DET AL 12 20 1 7 0 0 0 1 0 4 1 .350 .458 .350 138 7 0 0

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 12 1902 1913 554 1423 148 372 65 20 3 116 107 1 .261 .315 .342 17 0 99

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SAM CRAWFORD

Right Fielder, 1903-1917

"Wahoo Sam"

samcrawford1920.jpg

--Class of 1920--

Bats - Left

Throws - Left

Born - 4/18/1880

Died - 6/15/1968

Biography:

Pirated from the National League’s Cincinnati club, the Tigers got one of the most feared sluggers of the deadball era in 1903. Nicknamed "Wahoo" for the Nebraska town he was born in, Sam Crawford’s lethal bat puts him atop the list of Major League Baseball’s all-time triples hitters with 312 during his career. He reached double-digits in three-baggers for 17 consecutive seasons and had 250 during his time as a Tiger. Often overshadowed once Ty Cobb joined the Tigers, the two provided Detroit with the most potent 1-2 punch in baseball. They also were an effective duo when they worked together on double-steals, with Cobb on third base and Crawford on first. While considered a good fielder, Crawford's power remained legendary. One story suggests that Cleveland built a 40-foot right field wall at League Park to stop Crawford from hitting home runs at their park. It didn’t work as Crawford hit one over it the very next season. Cobb himself campaigned for Crawford's induction into Cooperstown, and "Wahoo Sam" was finally inducted in 1957. A year later he went into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1903 23 DET AL 137 550 88 184 23 25 4 89 18 25 .335 .366 .489 158 269 25 2
1904 24 DET AL 150 562 49 143 22 16 2 73 20 44 .254 .309 .361 114 203 11 0
1905 25 DET AL 154 575 73 171 38 10 6 75 22 50 .297 .357 .430 148 247 3 3
1906 26 DET AL 145 563 65 166 25 16 2 72 24 38 .295 .341 .407 131 229 8 1
1907 27 DET AL 144 582 102 188 34 17 4 81 18 37 .323 .366 .460 159 268 11 2
1908 28 DET AL 152 591 102 184 33 16 7 80 15 37 .311 .355 .457 159 270 23 3
1909 29 DET AL 156 589 83 185 35 14 6 97 30 47 .314 .366 .452 153 266 25 1
1910 30 DET AL 154 588 83 170 26 19 5 120 20 37 .289 .332 .423 130 249 24 1
1911 31 DET AL 146 574 109 217 36 14 7 115 37 61 .378 .438 .526 163 302 13 0
1912 32 DET AL 149 581 81 189 30 21 4 109 41 42 .325 .373 .470 143 273 19 2
1913 33 DET AL 153 609 78 193 32 23 9 83 13 52 28 .317 .371 .489 152 298 10 0
1914 34 DET AL 157 582 74 183 22 26 8 104 25 16 69 31 .314 .388 .483 158 281 22 1
1915 35 DET AL 156 612 81 183 31 19 4 112 24 14 66 29 .299 .367 .431 134 264 16 0
1916 36 DET AL 100 322 41 92 11 13 0 42 10 37 10 .286 .359 .401 124 129 9 0
1917 37 DET AL 61 104 6 18 4 0 2 12 0 4 6 .173 .204 .269 44 28 4 0

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 15 1903 1917 2114 7984 1115 2466 402 249 70 1264 646 104 .309 .362 .448 317 30 144

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BILL DONOVAN

Pitcher, 1903-1918

"Wild Bill"

billdonovan1920.jpg

--Class of 1920--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 10/13/1876

Died - 12/9/1923

Biography:

Tiger owner Frank Navin always kept two photographs near him, of his two favorite players. One of those pictures was of "Wild Bill" Donovan. "Yes, there was a pitcher. What a heart," said Navin. And from all indications, Navin was 100 percent accurate in his assessment. Donovan, whose nickname came from a combination of some early wildness in his career, from his wild running on the basepaths, and from his fiery nature during that got him into more than one scuffle, won 141 games with the Tigers while losing just 96. He posted a 25-4 mark during the Tigers’ 1907 pennant-winning season and was a combined 51-18 during the 1907-09 seasons. He struggled in World Series action (just as the team did), posting a 1-4 mark in postseason play. Donovan left the Tigers in 1915 to be a player-manager for the Yankees, but returned in 1918 to end his career in Detroit. He posted a 2.49 ERA during his tenure with the Tigers.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1903 26 DET AL 17 16 35 34 34 4 1 0 307.0 247 104 78 3 95 187 5 7 1231 2.29 127 1.114
1904 27 DET AL 17 16 34 34 30 3 0 0 293.0 251 111 80 5 94 137 11 11 1205 2.46 104 1.177
1905 28 DET AL 18 15 34 32 27 5 2 0 280.7 236 111 81 2 101 135 10 4 1173 2.60 105 1.201
1906 29 DET AL 9 15 25 25 22 0 0 0 211.7 221 92 74 4 72 85 8 2 923 3.15 88 1.384
1907 30 DET AL 25 4 32 28 27 3 4 1 271.0 222 96 66 3 82 123 8 2 1103 2.19 118 1.122
1908 31 DET AL 18 7 29 28 25 6 1 0 242.7 210 78 56 2 53 141 6 3 997 2.08 116 1.084
1909 32 DET AL 8 7 21 17 13 4 4 2 140.3 121 50 36 0 60 76 6 4 595 2.31 109 1.290
1910 33 DET AL 17 7 26 23 20 3 3 0 206.7 184 74 56 4 61 107 7 2 849 2.44 107 1.185
1911 34 DET AL 10 9 20 19 15 1 1 0 168.3 160 83 62 4 64 81 3 3 726 3.31 105 1.331
1912 35 DET AL 1 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 10.0 5 2 1 0 2 6 1 0 37 0.90 363 0.700
1918 41 DET AL 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 6.0 5 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 23 1.50 177 1.000

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 11 1903 1918 141 96 .595 2.49 261 242 19 213 29 3 2137.3 1862 802 591 27 685 1079 109

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HUGHIE JENNINGS

Manager, 1907-1920

"Ee-Yah"

hughiejennings1920.gif

--Class of 1925--

Born - 4/2/1869

Died - 2/1/1928

Biography:

Before he became manager of the Detroit Tigers, Tiger owner Frank Navin had to convince American League President Ban Johnson that he be given permission to hire the man with such a "rowdy" image. Johnson gave in and Tiger history was made. "Ee-yah" Hughie Jennings posted a mark of 1,131-972, leading the Tigers to AL pennants from 1907-1909. As much a showman as he was an outstanding baseball mind, he is known for one of the most indelible images in Tiger history. It is one of him holding both hands high while lifting one leg in the air in the coach’s box. His trademark yell was "Ee-yah" and could be heard during many Tiger rallies. Once a great player himself, he was considered a master psychologist. He was one of few that got along with Ty Cobb. He quickly realized Cobb knew more about the game than he’d ever learn, so he gave him free reign during games. And while some resented the special treatment, he still held his authority. He was one of the first managers to fine players, one day taking $50 from Claude Rossman for hitting a home run. He was supposed to bunt. Jennings was inducted into Baseball’s Hall of Fame in 1945.

Managerial Record:

[B]Year	League    	Team	Age	G	W	L	WP	Finish	Champs[/B]
1907 American Lg Detroit 38 153 92 58 .613 1 AL
1908 American Lg Detroit 39 154 90 63 .588 1 AL
1909 American Lg Detroit 40 158 98 54 .645 1 AL
1910 American Lg Detroit 41 155 86 68 .558 3
1911 American Lg Detroit 42 154 89 65 .578 2
1912 American Lg Detroit 43 154 69 84 .451 6
1913 American Lg Detroit 44 153 66 87 .431 6
1914 American Lg Detroit 45 157 80 73 .523 4
1915 American Lg Detroit 46 156 100 54 .649 2
1916 American Lg Detroit 47 155 87 67 .565 3
1917 American Lg Detroit 48 155 78 75 .510 4
1918 American Lg Detroit 49 128 55 71 .437 7
1919 American Lg Detroit 50 140 80 60 .571 4
1920 American Lg Detroit 51 155 61 93 .396 7

[B]YR From To G W L WP BstFin WstFin PostSsn Pennts WrldSer[/B]
TOTALS 14 1907 1920 2127 1131 972 .538 1 7 3 3 0

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BOBBY VEACH

Left Fielder, 1912-1923

veach.jpg

--Class of 1925--

Bats - Left

Throws - Right

Born - 6/29/1888

Died - 8/7/1945

Biography:

Bobby Veach started his professional baseball career as a pitcher, but he ended it as one of the greatest outfielders in Detroit Tigers history. Often overshadowed by the other great Tiger outfielders that surrounded him during his era, he still imposed his own fear in opposing pitchers. A .300 hitter in nine of his 12 seasons, he was a great power hitter who occasionally led the American League in doubles and triples. He also led the league in RBIs three times, and the Tigers, six times. He had great speed that served him well in left field and on the base paths. He also was noted for having a strong throwing arm. Veach recorded the first cycle in Tigers history when he went 6-for-6 in a 12-inning game against the Boston Red Sox. Veach’s relationship with Ty Cobb was icy, and it isn’t difficult to understand why. In order to "motivate" the easy-going Kentuckian, Cobb once ordered Harry Heilmann to heckle Veach mercilessly from the on-deck circle. After the season was over, Cobb was supposed to tell Veach about the plan. He never did. Veach and Heilmann never reconciled. An avid hunter, Veach used to hunt with Fowlerville resident Charlie Gehringer, planting the seeds for Gehringer’s career as a Tiger great.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1912 24 DET AL 23 79 8 27 5 1 0 15 2 5 .342 .388 .430 137 34 3 1
1913 25 DET AL 137 491 54 132 22 10 0 64 22 53 31 .269 .346 .354 106 174 15 5
1914 26 DET AL 149 531 56 146 19 14 1 72 20 20 50 29 .275 .341 .369 111 196 22 3
1915 27 DET AL 152 569 81 178 40 10 3 112 16 19 68 43 .313 .390 .434 142 247 18 4
1916 28 DET AL 150 566 92 173 33 15 3 91 24 15 52 41 .306 .367 .433 136 245 24 3
1917 29 DET AL 154 571 79 182 31 12 8 103 21 61 44 .319 .393 .457 159 261 25 9
1918 30 DET AL 127 499 59 139 21 13 3 78 21 35 23 .279 .331 .391 121 195 17 4
1919 31 DET AL 139 538 87 191 45 17 3 101 19 33 33 .355 .398 .519 158 279 22 5
1920 32 DET AL 154 612 92 188 39 15 11 113 11 7 36 22 .307 .353 .474 119 290 15 7
1921 33 DET AL 150 612 110 207 43 13 16 128 14 10 48 31 .338 .387 .529 133 324 27 1
1922 34 DET AL 155 618 96 202 34 13 9 126 9 1 42 27 .327 .377 .468 122 289 36 8
1923 35 DET AL 114 293 45 94 13 3 2 39 10 3 29 21 .321 .388 .406 111 119 14 3

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 12 1912 1923 1604 5979 859 1859 345 136 59 1042 512 345 .311 .370 .444 189 75 130

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ED KILLIAN

Pitcher, 1904-1910

"Twilight Ed"

edkillian.jpg

--Class of 1925--

Bats - Left

Throws - Left

Born - 11/12/1876

Died - 7/18/1928

Biography:

"Twilight" Ed Killian was a vital starting lefty for each of the Tigers’ first three pennant winning seasons in 1907-1909. His best season was in 1907, when Killian posted a 25-13 mark and a 1.78 earned run average. He also won both games of a doubleheader during that season. He earned his nickname "Twilight" because he pitched in a great number of extra-inning games. Killian also became known for another thing – his ability to avoid giving up the gopher ball. Playing his entire Tiger career during the deadball era, he once pitched 1,001 straight innings without allowing a single four-bagger. Killian didn’t get along with Ty Cobb, totally ignoring him during Cobb's rookie campaign. When he didn’t ignore him, the result was normally turmoil. One time Killian reportedly smashed all of Cobb’s bats. He also was known to throw at Cobb’s ankles during batting practice, claiming – as Cobb would recall in later years – that the pitch got away from him.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1904 27 DET AL 14 20 40 34 32 4 6 1 331.7 293 118 90 0 93 124 17 6 1364 2.44 104 1.164
1905 28 DET AL 23 14 39 37 33 8 2 0 313.3 263 108 79 0 102 110 13 4 0 2.27 120 1.165
1906 29 DET AL 10 6 21 16 14 0 5 2 149.7 165 71 57 0 54 47 5 4 0 3.43 81 1.463
1907 30 DET AL 25 13 41 34 29 3 7 1 314.0 286 103 62 2 91 96 13 2 1302 1.78 146 1.201
1908 31 DET AL 12 9 27 23 15 0 4 1 180.7 170 78 60 3 53 47 8 1 736 2.99 81 1.234
1909 32 DET AL 11 9 25 19 14 3 4 1 173.3 150 45 33 1 49 54 6 4 691 1.71 147 1.148
1910 33 DET AL 4 3 11 9 5 1 1 0 74.0 75 38 25 2 27 20 6 1 313 3.04 86 1.378

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 7 1904 1910 99 74 .572 2.38 204 172 29 142 19 6 1536.7 1402 561 406 8 469 498 109

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TY COBB

Center Fielder, 1905-1926

Manager, 1921-1926

"The Georgia Peach"

tycobb.jpg

--Class of 1930--

Bats - Left

Throws - Right

Born - 12/18/1886

Died - 7/17/1961

Biography:

A true genius in spikes, Ty Cobb was not only the greatest hitter but also the most competitive and most controversial character in Tiger history. "The Georgia Peach" was also the fiercest of them all. He approached every game as though he were at war, and had more enemies than friends inside his own dugout. He was a racist and a bully, but he also was the greatest hitter baseball has seen, sporting a lifetime .366 batting average which was (and is) the best in baseball history. Holder of many offensive records at one time, he is second in hits (4,189), runs scored (2,246), and triples (298). He was never better than he was between 1911 and 1913 seasons, when he batted over .400 combined during those three years. Perhaps the reason for his competitive nature had to do with the death of his father. Shot dead by his own mother, Cobb's father never approved of a career in baseball. When he finally consented, he told young Ty not to come back until he was successful. Ty apparently took that to heart, joining the Tigers via the Royston Reds soon after his father's death. He was as good on the base paths as he was at the plate, stealing 892 career bases; including as many as 54 times in which he stole home. He also hit a career record 47 inside-the-park homers. When Hughie Jennings was replaced as manager, Cobb took over that job as well. Never blessed with a strong pitching staff, his lineup was filled with many tremendous hitters. He led the Tigers to one second-place effort and two third-place efforts during his six years. Though hated and feared long after his playing career was over, he was nevertheless the top vote recipient during the inaugural National Baseball Hall of Fame elections in 1936.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1905 18 DET AL 41 150 19 36 6 0 1 15 2 10 .240 .288 .300 86 45 4 0
1906 19 DET AL 98 358 45 113 15 5 1 34 23 19 .316 .355 .394 131 141 14 3
1907 20 DET AL 150 605 97 212 28 14 5 119 49 24 .350 .380 .468 166 283 12 5
1908 21 DET AL 150 581 88 188 36 20 4 108 39 34 .324 .367 .475 169 276 14 6
1909 22 DET AL 156 573 116 216 33 10 9 107 76 48 .377 .431 .517 194 296 24 6
1910 23 DET AL 140 506 106 194 35 13 8 91 65 64 .383 .456 .551 206 279 16 4
1911 24 DET AL 146 591 147 248 47 24 8 127 83 44 .420 .467 .621 196 367 11 8
1912 25 DET AL 140 553 120 226 30 23 7 83 61 43 .409 .456 .584 200 323 8 5
1913 26 DET AL 122 428 70 167 18 16 4 67 51 58 31 .390 .467 .535 194 229 11 4
1914 27 DET AL 98 345 69 127 22 11 2 57 35 17 57 22 .368 .466 .513 190 177 6 6
1915 28 DET AL 156 563 144 208 31 13 3 99 96 38 118 43 .369 .486 .487 185 274 9 10
1916 29 DET AL 145 542 113 201 31 10 5 68 68 24 78 39 .371 .452 .493 179 267 14 2
1917 30 DET AL 152 588 107 225 44 24 6 102 55 61 34 .383 .444 .570 209 335 16 4
1918 31 DET AL 111 421 83 161 19 14 3 64 34 41 21 .382 .440 .515 193 217 9 2
1919 32 DET AL 124 497 92 191 36 13 1 70 28 38 22 .384 .429 .515 166 256 9 1
1920 33 DET AL 112 428 86 143 28 8 2 63 15 10 58 28 .334 .416 .451 131 193 7 2
1921 34 DET AL 128 507 124 197 37 16 12 101 22 15 56 19 .389 .452 .596 166 302 15 3
1922 35 DET AL 137 526 99 211 42 16 4 99 9 13 55 24 .401 .462 .565 170 297 27 4
1923 36 DET AL 145 556 103 189 40 7 6 88 9 10 66 14 .340 .413 .469 134 261 22 3
1924 37 DET AL 155 625 115 211 38 10 4 78 23 14 85 18 .338 .418 .450 125 281 15 1
1925 38 DET AL 121 415 97 157 31 12 12 102 13 9 65 12 .378 .468 .598 170 248 5 5
1926 39 DET AL 79 233 48 79 18 5 4 62 9 4 26 2 .339 .408 .511 137 119 13 1

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 22 1905 1926 2806 10591 2088 3900 665 284 111 1804 1148 329 .368 .434 .516 865 154 171

Managerial Record:

[B]Year	League    	Team	Age	G	W	L	WP	Finish	Champs[/B]
1921 American Lg Detroit 34 154 71 82 .464 6
1922 American Lg Detroit 35 155 79 75 .513 3
1923 American Lg Detroit 36 155 83 71 .539 2
1924 American Lg Detroit 37 156 86 68 .558 3
1925 American Lg Detroit 38 156 81 73 .526 4
1926 American Lg Detroit 39 157 79 75 .513 6

[B]YR From To G W L WP BstFin WstFin PostSsn Pennts WrldSer[/B]
TOTALS 6 1921 1926 933 479 444 .519 2 6 0 0 0

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HARRY HEILMANN

Right Fielder, 1914-1929

Broadcaster, 1934-1950

"Slug"

Harry_Heilmann.jpg

--Class of 1930--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 8/3/1894

Died - 7/9/1951

Biography:

One of the greatest hitting Tiger players of all time can credit his career to an old friend who offered him $10 to play third base in Bakersfield. In the crowd there was a scout for the Portland Colts, and the rest is history. The greatest hitting pupil of Ty Cobb’s career, Harry "Slug" Heilmann was one of the most feared hitters of his time. Providing a nice combination of power and average, Heilmann hit 183 homers during a time when round-trippers weren’t terribly plentiful. He also hit .403 in 1923, .398 in 1927, .294 in 1921, and .393 in 1925. A big man – reportedly 6-foot-1 and 200 pounds - Heilmann was also well liked by his teammates. In 1933 he became a Tiger broadcaster, a role in which he flourished between both radio and television until 1952. On the air he was known for his telling of stories from his playing days. Later, while he was dying of lung cancer, Cobb came to his hospital room to tell Heilmann he was being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. He lied. Heilmann was inducted in 1952, a year after his death.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1914 19 DET AL 69 182 25 41 8 1 2 18 1 8 22 29 .225 .316 .313 87 57 12 2
1916 21 DET AL 136 451 57 127 30 11 2 73 9 42 40 .282 .349 .410 124 185 15 5
1917 22 DET AL 150 556 57 156 22 11 5 86 11 41 54 .281 .333 .387 120 215 19 3
1918 23 DET AL 79 286 34 79 10 6 5 39 13 35 10 .276 .359 .406 134 116 8 2
1919 24 DET AL 140 537 74 172 30 15 8 93 7 37 41 .320 .366 .477 137 256 18 2
1920 25 DET AL 145 543 66 168 28 5 9 89 3 7 39 32 .309 .358 .429 110 233 18 2
1921 26 DET AL 149 602 114 237 43 14 19 139 2 6 53 37 .394 .444 .606 167 365 15 2
1922 27 DET AL 118 455 92 162 27 10 21 92 8 4 58 28 .356 .432 .598 169 272 11 3
1923 28 DET AL 144 524 121 211 44 11 18 115 9 7 74 40 .403 .481 .632 194 331 23 5
1924 29 DET AL 153 570 107 197 45 16 10 114 13 5 78 41 .346 .428 .533 149 304 26 4
1925 30 DET AL 150 573 97 225 40 11 13 134 6 6 67 27 .393 .457 .569 160 326 23 1
1926 31 DET AL 141 502 90 184 41 8 9 103 6 7 67 19 .367 .445 .534 153 268 25 4
1927 32 DET AL 141 505 106 201 50 9 14 120 11 5 72 16 .398 .475 .616 180 311 17 2
1928 33 DET AL 151 558 83 183 38 10 14 107 7 3 57 45 .328 .390 .507 132 283 18 0
1929 34 DET AL 125 453 86 156 41 7 15 120 5 6 50 39 .344 .412 .565 149 256 14 2

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 15 1914 1929 1991 7297 1209 2499 497 145 164 1442 792 498 .342 .410 .518 111 64 148

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HOOKS DAUSS

Pitcher, 1912-1926

hooksdauss.jpg

--Class of 1930--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 9/22/1889

Died - 7/27/1963

Biography:

The all-time winningest pitcher in Tiger history, George August "Hooks" Dauss won 222 games during his time in Detroit, while tossing 3,391 innings, second only to George Mullin. Relying on an effective curve ball, for which his nickname can be credited, Dauss earned double-digit victories for 14 consecutive seasons. He won at least 20 games in three of those seasons. He also threw a pitch called a fadeaway ball. During a time when the Tigers’ pitching staff struggled, he recorded earned run averages below 3.00 five times during his 15-year career.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1912 22 DET AL 1 1 2 2 2 0 0 0 17.0 11 7 6 0 9 7 3 0 71 3.18 103 1.176
1913 23 DET AL 13 12 33 29 22 2 4 1 225.0 188 101 62 4 82 107 13 8 918 2.48 118 1.200
1914 24 DET AL 18 15 45 35 22 3 8 4 302.0 286 126 96 3 87 150 18 8 1218 2.86 98 1.235
1915 25 DET AL 24 13 46 35 27 1 9 2 309.7 261 115 86 1 115 132 11 8 1235 2.50 121 1.214
1916 26 DET AL 19 12 39 29 18 1 9 4 238.7 220 102 85 2 90 95 16 8 961 3.21 89 1.299
1917 27 DET AL 17 14 37 31 22 6 5 2 270.7 243 105 73 3 87 102 7 4 1090 2.43 109 1.219
1918 28 DET AL 12 16 33 26 21 1 7 3 249.7 243 105 83 3 58 73 9 5 1027 2.99 89 1.206
1919 29 DET AL 21 9 34 32 22 2 1 0 256.3 262 125 101 9 63 73 5 1 1049 3.55 90 1.268
1920 30 DET AL 13 21 38 32 18 0 6 0 270.3 308 158 107 11 84 82 8 3 1174 3.56 104 1.450
1921 31 DET AL 10 15 32 28 16 0 4 1 233.0 275 141 112 11 81 68 13 1 1047 4.33 99 1.528
1922 32 DET AL 13 13 39 25 12 1 13 4 218.7 251 123 102 7 59 78 6 0 967 4.20 92 1.418
1923 33 DET AL 21 13 50 39 22 4 9 3 316.0 331 140 127 10 78 105 7 1 1340 3.62 107 1.294
1924 34 DET AL 12 11 40 10 5 0 20 6 131.3 155 78 67 6 40 44 1 0 580 4.59 89 1.485
1925 35 DET AL 16 11 35 30 16 1 3 1 228.0 238 110 80 11 85 58 4 1 990 3.16 136 1.417
1926 36 DET AL 12 6 35 5 0 0 23 9 124.3 135 63 58 6 49 27 0 0 536 4.20 97 1.480

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 15 1912 1926 222 182 .550 3.30 538 388 121 245 22 40 3390.7 3407 1599 1245 87 1067 1201 102

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FRANK NAVIN

Owner, 1908-1935

President, 1903-1935

navin.jpg

--Class of 1935--

Born - 4/18/1871

Died - 11/13/1935

Biography:

What was initially 10 percent interest in a baseball club for brokering a deal, quickly became a passion for Frank Navin. And because of it, the organization's ex-bookkeeper became the most influential owner in Detroit Tigers history. While majority owner William H. Yawkey was away with little interest in the club, Navin was learning everything he could about owning a professional baseball club. And while doing so he made some decisions that not only solidified the Tiger organization but also allowed them to thrive and become a part of the community’s fabric. He scouted and purchased the greatest Tiger of all, Ty Cobb, for $750. With the makings of a champion he brought the manager that could finish the deal, Hughie Jennings. However, he had to convince American League President Ban Johnson first. He did. The Tigers won championships from 1907 to 1909 but were still on shaky ground in terms of being a permanent fixture in the AL. The Tigers ranked eighth in attendance in the AL in 1907, but Navin remained unwavering, only investing money into the organization and continuously improving the product. Earning more of the percentage of ownership throughout the years, Navin eventually became the face of Tiger baseball. He brought Sunday baseball to Detroit. He brought expansion to Bennett Field and in 1912 opened Navin Field, a permanent structure that held 23,000 fans. As Detroit’s population expanded, so did the Tigers’ prosperity. The stadium, now double-decked around the first and third baselines, grew to hold 29,000 in 1923. By 1929 the "Motor City" was established, and with it, Navin’s empire. During the depression Navin made his final run for a World Championship. He purchased Mickey Cochrane to be player-manager and to cement an already talented team. The investment paid off. Falling short after losing 1934 World Series in seven games, the Tigers finally won their first World Championship in 1935. With the aid of Walter Briggs (by now co-owner), Navin declared that the stadium would be expanded once again after the title was clinched. Unfortunately, he didn’t live to see its completion, dying a month after the Tigers’ Series victory. Navin, who was well known for his poker face and gambling, was one of baseball’s most respected figures throughout his career. Three American League presidents – Johnson, E.S. Banard, and William Harridge – listened intently to Navin’s opinions, as did baseball commissioner Judge Landis. He even served as interim American League president in 1927, following Johnson's death.

Executive Record:

[b]Year	Team	W	L	WP	Finish	Champs[/b]
1903 Detroit 65 71 .478 5
1904 Detroit 62 90 .408 7
1905 Detroit 79 74 .516 3
1906 Detroit 71 78 .477 6
[b]1907 Detroit 92 58 .613 1 AL
1908 Detroit 90 63 .588 1 AL
1909 Detroit 98 54 .645 1 AL[/b]
1910 Detroit 86 68 .558 3
1911 Detroit 89 65 .578 2
1912 Detroit 69 84 .451 6
1913 Detroit 66 87 .431 6
1914 Detroit 80 73 .523 4
1915 Detroit 100 54 .649 2
1916 Detroit 87 67 .565 3
1917 Detroit 78 75 .510 4
1918 Detroit 55 71 .437 7
1919 Detroit 80 60 .571 4
1920 Detroit 61 93 .396 7
1921 Detroit 71 82 .464 6
1922 Detroit 79 75 .513 3
1923 Detroit 83 71 .539 2
1924 Detroit 86 68 .558 3
1925 Detroit 81 73 .526 4
1926 Detroit 79 75 .513 6
1927 Detroit 82 71 .536 4
1928 Detroit 68 86 .442 6
1929 Detroit 70 84 .455 6
1930 Detroit 75 79 .487 5
1931 Detroit 61 93 .396 7
1932 Detroit 76 75 .503 5
1933 Detroit 75 79 .487 5
[b]1934 Detroit 101 53 .656 1 AL
1935 Detroit 93 58 .616 1 WS[/b]

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MICKEY COCHRANE

Manager, 1934-1938

Catcher, 1934-1937

"Black Mike"

#3

mickeycochrane.jpg

--Class of 1940--

Bats - Left

Throws - Right

Born - 4/6/1903

Died - 6/28/1962

Biography:

A fiery personality, Gordon Stanley "Mickey" Cochrane’s infectious and competitive nature brought the best and the worst out of him during his life. For the Detroit Tigers, it brought much more good than bad. Looking for a new manager entering 1934, Babe Ruth was the early front runner. However, his snub opened the door for Mickey Cochrane. The Tigers got him for $100,000 and it paid off in spades. In 1934 he was named the American League’s Most Valuable Player, despite the fact that Lou Gehrig completed the Triple Crown. The Tigers won their first AL pennant since 1909 but fell short of their first World Championship in a crushing seven-game World Series loss to St. Louis's Gashouse Gang. But Cochrane’s troops had one more run in them. In 1935 Cochrane had another outstanding season and the Tigers capped it off with the first World Series championship in team history, with Cochrane scoring the game-winning run in the sixth and deciding game. Reportedly not a great defensive player initially, "Black Mike" made himself a strong catcher. He had an outstanding arm and good speed on the basepaths. At the plate he almost always put the ball in play, and batted .313 during his Tiger career. In the end, his competitive nature got the best of him. He suffered a nervous breakdown in 1936. In 1937 he almost lost his life when he was drilled in the head by a Bump Hadley pitch. Finally, after a lackluster first half, he was let go as manager midway through the 1938 season. A member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, he came back as a Tiger scout in 1960 and even served as the team’s vice president in 1962. So respected, when he died shortly thereafter, the street that lined the left field line at Tiger Stadium was renamed Cochrane Avenue.

Managerial Record:

[B]Year	League    	Team	Age	G	W	L	WP	Finish	Champs[/B]
1934 American Lg Detroit 31 154 101 53 .656 1 AL
1935 American Lg Detroit 32 152 93 58 .616 1 WS
1936 American Lg Detroit 33 120 65 55 .542 2
1937 American Lg Detroit 34 76 42 33 .560 2
1938 American Lg Detroit 35 98 47 51 .480 4

[B]YR From To G W L WP BstFin WstFin PostSsn Pennts WrldSer[/B]
TOTALS 5 1934 1938 600 348 250 .582 1 4 2 2 1

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1934 31 DET AL 129 437 74 140 32 1 2 76 8 4 78 26 .320 .428 .412 117 180 5 4
1935 32 DET AL 115 411 93 131 33 3 5 47 5 5 96 15 .319 .452 .450 137 185 11 4
1936 33 DET AL 44 126 24 34 8 0 2 17 1 1 46 15 .270 .465 .381 111 48 6 0
1937 34 DET AL 27 98 27 30 10 1 2 12 0 1 25 4 .306 .452 .490 135 48 2 1

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 4 1934 1937 315 1072 218 335 83 5 11 152 245 60 .312 .444 .430 14 11 126

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DONIE BUSH

Shortstop, 1908-1921

doniebush.jpg

--Class of 1940--

Bats - Both

Throws - Right

Born - 10/8/1887

Died - 3/28/1972

Biography:

One of the great lead-off hitters of the deadball era, Owen Joseph "Donie" Bush was the keys to the engine for Detroit’s 1909 pennant winning season and for the duration of the following decade. The 5-foot-6 switch hitter had no power to speak of, and only carried a .250 batting average during his Tiger career, but he could do one thing very well - he could draw walks. In fact, he drew 1,242 of them during his time in Detroit, only 502 fewer than he had hits. His late-season addition to the 1908 season was credited for not only improving the lineup, but for erasing the defensive problems at shortstop in one of the greatest pennant races in baseball history. When he got on base for the Tigers’ feared hitters, he also had the speed to drive defenses crazy. He stole 400 bases in his Tiger career, second in franchise history to Ty Cobb. He ended up scoring 1,242 runs in Detroit, good for fifth on the franchise's all-time list. As his career continued, some talked about his glove going from a plus to a minus, but he remained around long enough to start 1,846 games at shorstop, second only to Alan Trammell. His career was hardly over after his extensive playing career. He spent 65 years in organized ball as a player, a manager, a scout, and an owner.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1908 20 DET AL 20 68 13 20 1 1 0 4 2 7 .294 .360 .338 123 23 4 0
1909 21 DET AL 157 532 114 145 18 2 0 33 53 88 .273 .380 .314 116 167 52 4
1910 22 DET AL 142 496 90 130 13 4 3 34 49 78 .262 .365 .323 109 160 30 2
1911 23 DET AL 150 561 126 130 18 5 1 36 40 98 .232 .349 .287 75 161 30 3
1912 24 DET AL 144 511 107 118 14 8 2 38 35 117 .231 .377 .301 97 154 12 3
1913 25 DET AL 153 597 98 150 19 10 1 40 44 80 32 .251 .344 .322 96 192 13 4
1914 26 DET AL 157 596 97 150 18 4 0 32 35 26 112 54 .252 .373 .295 99 176 10 3
1915 27 DET AL 155 561 99 128 12 8 1 44 35 27 118 44 .228 .364 .283 90 159 22 2
1916 28 DET AL 145 550 73 124 5 9 0 34 19 75 42 .225 .319 .267 73 147 27 1
1917 29 DET AL 147 581 112 163 18 3 0 24 34 80 40 .281 .370 .322 111 187 10 2
1918 30 DET AL 128 500 74 117 10 3 0 22 9 79 31 .234 .340 .266 86 133 13 1
1919 31 DET AL 129 509 82 124 11 6 0 26 22 75 36 .244 .343 .289 80 147 16 2
1920 32 DET AL 141 506 85 133 18 5 1 33 15 7 73 32 .263 .357 .324 83 164 48 1
1921 33 DET AL 104 402 72 113 6 5 0 27 8 11 45 23 .281 .355 .321 74 129 40 1

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 14 1908 1921 1872 6970 1242 1745 181 73 9 427 1125 334 .250 .357 .301 400 71 92

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CHARLIE GEHRINGER

Second Baseman, 1924-1942

"The Mechanical Man"

#2

charliegehringer.jpg

--Class of 1945--

Bats - Left

Throws - Right

Born - 5/11/1903

Died - 1/21/1993

Biography:

The Fowlerville native was known as "The Mechanical Man" – and for good reason. "You wind him up in the spring and he goes all summer. He hits .330 or .340 or whatever, and then shuts off in the fall," said Yankees Hall of Famer Lefty Gomez. And that was about it. He was a quiet man who didn’t marry until after his mother’s death, devoted to her to the very end. On the field he was a model of consistency at second base and at the plate. Already considered baseball's best defensive second baseman for most of his career, he also batted .320 during his 19-year career in Detroit. He finished his career with 2,839 hits, and clouted 574 doubles. He scored 1,774 runs and plated 1,427 more. He also found time to steal 182 bases. During the 1930s, he was one of the Tigers’ "G Men." Along with Hank Greenberg and Goose Goslin, Gehringer made up a potent offense that led the American League comfortably in runs scored between 1934 and 1935. In 1934 he combined with Greenberg, Billy Rogell, and Marv Owen for what was one of baseball’s top run-producing infields. Gehringer drove in 127 runs that season, while Rogell was the only infielder not to reach 100 RBI's, tallying 96. An All-Star selection in 1933, Gehringer was selected to six straight Summer Classics. He also was the American League Most Valuable Player in 1937, when he batted an incredible .371 with 14 home runs and 96 RBI. He played with the Tigers right through 1942, whereupon at age 39 he joined the Navy, midway through the Second World War. Year later, from 1951-1953, Gehringer served as the Tigers' general manager. He continued to serve in the front office as vice president until 1959. Throughout his career, Gehringer frequently played in barnstorming games against Negro League teams, and his legend was thus furthered. "He was some ball player," remarked fellow Hall of Famer and Negro League star Cool Papa Bell. The admiration was mutual.

He was inducted into Baseball’s Hall of Fame in 1949 and joined the Michigan Hall of Fame in 1956. His number was retired on the same day as his great teammate Greenberg.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1924 21 DET AL 5 13 2 6 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 .462 .462 .462 140 6 0 0
1925 22 DET AL 8 18 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 .167 .250 .167 8 3 0 0
1926 23 DET AL 123 459 62 127 19 17 1 48 9 7 30 42 .277 .322 .399 86 183 27 1
1927 24 DET AL 133 508 110 161 29 11 4 61 17 8 52 31 .317 .383 .441 112 224 9 2
1928 25 DET AL 154 603 108 193 29 16 6 74 15 9 69 22 .320 .395 .451 120 272 13 6
1929 26 DET AL 155 634 131 215 45 19 13 106 27 9 64 19 .339 .405 .532 139 337 11 6
1930 27 DET AL 154 610 144 201 47 15 16 98 19 15 69 17 .330 .404 .534 134 326 13 7
1931 28 DET AL 101 383 67 119 24 5 4 53 13 4 29 15 .311 .359 .431 104 165 2 0
1932 29 DET AL 152 618 112 184 44 11 19 107 9 8 68 34 .298 .370 .497 119 307 3 3
1933 30 DET AL 155 628 103 204 42 6 12 105 5 4 68 27 .325 .393 .468 126 294 6 3
1934 31 DET AL 154 601 134 214 50 7 11 127 11 8 99 25 .356 .450 .517 149 311 5 3
1935 32 DET AL 150 610 123 201 32 8 19 108 11 4 79 16 .330 .409 .502 137 306 17 3
1936 33 DET AL 154 641 144 227 60 12 15 116 4 1 83 13 .354 .431 .555 142 356 3 4
1937 34 DET AL 144 564 133 209 40 1 14 96 11 4 90 25 .371 .458 .520 144 293 5 1
1938 35 DET AL 152 568 133 174 32 5 20 107 14 1 113 21 .306 .425 .486 122 276 3 4
1939 36 DET AL 118 406 86 132 29 6 16 86 4 3 68 16 .325 .423 .544 138 221 11 1
1940 37 DET AL 139 515 108 161 33 3 10 81 10 0 101 17 .313 .428 .447 118 230 10 3
1941 38 DET AL 127 436 65 96 19 4 3 46 1 2 95 26 .220 .363 .303 71 132 3 3
1942 39 DET AL 45 45 6 12 0 0 1 7 0 0 7 4 .267 .365 .333 91 15 0 0

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 19 1924 1942 2323 8860 1774 2839 574 146 184 1427 1186 372 .320 .404 .480 181 89 124

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RUDY YORK

First Baseman, 1934-1945

#4

rudyyork.jpg

--Class of 1945--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 8/17/1913

Died - 2/5/1970

Biography:

Rudy York simply couldn’t find a position on the field for the Detroit Tigers. But a bean ball to Mickey Cochrane and the eventual move of Hank Greenberg changed all that. With a position secured, York became one of the premier Tiger sluggers of the mid-1930s and early 1940s. Always ridiculed for his glove no matter where he played, no one dared ridicule his lumber. That was particularly true during his rookie season. Replacing Cochrane at catcher, he began reaching the fences. And for one particular month, he reached the fences more than anyone had ever done in baseball history. In August 1937, York clubbed an incredible 18 home runs, and drove in 49 RBIs. The record held for decades until Sammy Sosa broke it at Tiger Stadium in June of 1998. All told, York hit 35 home runs in just 375 at bats in that 1937 season. He never hit the long ball at that torrid pace again, but he hit at least 21 home runs in each of his first six full seasons with the Tigers, and never hit less than 18 during any of his seasons as a regular. During World War II he was one of the few legitimate power hitters, leading the American League with 34 home runs in 1943. York made the All-Star team five times, and was a clear fan favorite because of his rugged style. He hit 33 home runs and drove in 134 runs during the Tigers’ pennant-winning 1940 season. This season was made possible when Greenberg agreed to move to left field for the good of the team, cementing York as a full-time fixture at first base. It was once said that York was part Cherokee and part first baseman. The former was certain; the latter, not as much. But the bat was never in doubt. Everything he did was in the extreme – even off the field. He once claimed that he wasted every penny he earned during his career, spending $250,000 on booze, women and a new car every year.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1934 20 DET AL 3 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 .167 .286 .167 19 1 0 0
1937 23 DET AL 104 375 72 115 18 3 35 103 3 2 41 52 .307 .375 .651 151 244 1 0
1938 24 DET AL 135 463 85 138 27 2 33 127 1 2 92 74 .298 .417 .579 141 268 0 2
1939 25 DET AL 102 329 66 101 16 1 20 68 5 0 41 50 .307 .387 .544 128 179 4 2
1940 26 DET AL 155 588 105 186 46 6 33 134 3 2 89 88 .316 .410 .583 144 343 4 4
1941 27 DET AL 155 590 91 153 29 3 27 111 3 1 92 88 .259 .360 .456 106 269 4 1
1942 28 DET AL 153 577 81 150 26 4 21 90 3 3 73 71 .260 .343 .428 109 247 3 0
1943 29 DET AL 155 571 90 155 22 11 34 118 5 5 84 88 .271 .366 .527 152 301 5 1
1944 30 DET AL 151 583 77 161 27 7 18 98 5 3 68 73 .276 .353 .439 120 256 0 1
1945 31 DET AL 155 595 71 157 25 5 18 87 6 6 60 85 .264 .331 .413 110 246 0 0

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 10 1934 1945 1268 4677 738 1317 236 42 239 936 641 672 .282 .369 .503 34 24 128

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SCHOOLBOY ROWE

Pitcher, 1933-1942

#14

rowe.jpg

--Class of 1945--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 1/11/1910

Died - 1/8/1961

Biography:

They may have called him Schoolboy, but during his 10-year Tiger career it was the lanky 6-foot-4 righthander that did most of the teaching. When healthy, there were very few pitchers who could match Lynwood Thomas "Schoolboy" Rowe’s talent or character. Born in an oil boomtown in Arkansas, Rowe was named Schoolboy when he played for a semi-pro baseball team at age 15. As many older players who faced Rowe would learn to say; "I was beaten by a schoolboy." Rowe beat many players with his ability to mix a fierce fastball with an effective curveball and changeup. In 1933 he showed a hint of his potential with a 3.58 ERA and a 7-4 mark. However, he inched his game up another notch in 1934, tying an American League record with 16 straight wins. He finished the season at 24-8, completing 20 of the 30 games he started. He continued his strong play into 1935, posting a 19-9 record and pitching 21 innings during the World Series. It was a series the Tigers won, earning them their first ever World Championship after four unsuccessful tries. Due to arm troubles, Rowe hardly pitched during the 1937 and 1938 seasons, but bounced back with one of his finest seasons in 1940, going 16-3 with a 3.46 ERA and helping lead the Tigers to a third World Series in seven years. He would leave the team in 1942, but his mark was already established. As colorful as he was talented, Rowe was the son of a circus performer and was well known for his catchphrase "How am I doin’, Edna?", a question he had asked of his wife during a radio interview. Edna, a very beautiful lady, became almost as much a celebrity as Rowe, eventually writing a column for The Detroit News. Rowe himself was very superstitious, and among his collection was a lucky Canadian penny, rabbit’s foot, jade elephant figurine, and four feathers that were plucked from a three-legged rooster for luck. A great athlete, he was considered the top hitting pitcher of the 1930s, batting .271 with nine homers in his 561 at-bats as a Tiger. He had 22 pinch hit at-bats during his Tiger career, and compiled 111 RBIs and 83 runs scored during his time in Detroit. All told, Rowe went 105-62 with a .629 winning percentage with the Tigers.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1933 23 DET AL 7 4 19 15 8 1 3 0 123.3 129 60 49 7 31 75 1 3 521 3.58 121 1.297
1934 24 DET AL 24 8 45 30 20 3 13 1 266.0 259 110 102 12 81 149 1 1 1111 3.45 128 1.278
1935 25 DET AL 19 13 42 34 21 6 8 3 275.7 272 121 113 11 68 140 2 1 1146 3.69 114 1.233
1936 26 DET AL 19 10 41 35 19 4 5 3 245.3 266 134 123 15 64 115 2 5 1046 4.51 109 1.345
1937 27 DET AL 1 4 10 2 1 0 2 0 31.3 49 32 30 7 9 6 1 1 152 8.62 54 1.851
1938 28 DET AL 0 2 4 3 0 0 1 0 21.0 20 11 7 1 11 4 0 0 93 3.00 166 1.476
1939 29 DET AL 10 12 28 24 8 1 2 0 164.0 192 113 91 17 61 51 2 2 734 4.99 98 1.543
1940 30 DET AL 16 3 27 23 11 1 4 0 169.0 170 68 65 15 43 61 1 2 706 3.46 138 1.260
1941 31 DET AL 8 6 27 14 4 0 9 1 139.0 155 70 64 6 33 54 0 2 599 4.14 110 1.353
1942 32 DET AL 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 10.3 9 2 0 0 2 7 0 0 43 0.00 inf 1.065

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 10 1933 1942 105 62 .629 4.01 245 181 47 92 16 8 1445.0 1521 721 644 91 403 662 114

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HANK GREENBERG

First Baseman, 1930-1946

"Hammerin' Hank"

#5

hankgreenberg.jpg

--Class of 1950--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 1/1/1911

Died - 9/4/1986

Biography:

Certainly one of the most feared sluggers of all time, "Hammerin'" Hank Greenberg flirted with many impressive offensive records during his dominating career with the Detroit Tigers. Not known as a natural athlete, Greenberg worked for those numbers. And at other times, he worked to be effective with the glove. The first prominent Jewish player in baseball, he held the hopes and dreams of a large group of people on his shoulders and did so in spectacular fashion. Coveted by the Yankees as well, this Bronx native said he saw Lou Gehrig playing first base while being recruited by his hometown team. Despite what was being said to him by the New York front office, he realized that he had no future there and signed with Detroit. In 1933 he had his first real action with his parent club, clouting 12 homers and compiling a .301 average. In 1934 he missed just one game during the Tigers’ AL pennant-winning season, batting .339 and smashing 26 homers and 63 doubles. Amid considerable controversy throughout Detroit, Greenberg decided to play on Rosh Hashanah, the first day of the Jewish season; however he later sat out on Yom Kippur. During the Rosh Hashanah game he hit two solo homers en route to a 2-1 victory. Greenberg's bat seemingly always created headlines. In 1938, he chased Babe Ruth’s single-season home run record, smashing 58 long-balls before season's end. A year earlier, he came within one RBI of the single-season record with 183. Hammerin' Hank was one of the first baseball players to leave the game due to military service, missing most or all of the regular season between 1941 and 1945. However, when he was granted leave during the Tigers' 1945 pennant run, Greenberg made the absolute most of it. Hank hit a home run during his first game back in 1945, and concluded that magical regular season with a game-winning, pennant-clinching grand-slam in the final game of the season against the St. Louis Browns. Greenberg was more than power, however. When asked to move to left field because Rudy York’s only possible defensive position was first base, Greenberg made the move in 1940 -- for an extra $10,000. He worked relentlessly to make himself an adequate left fielder, and went on to win the second MVP of his career -– the only player to win the award at two different positions. Greenberg also missed most of the 1936 season due to a wrist injury. And yet despite losing peak years to injury and the Second World War, this slugger still finished his Tiger career with 306 homers, a .319 batting average and a .616 slugging percentage. Inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1956 and the Michigan Hall of Fame in 1986, Greenberg was fifth on baseball’s all-time home run list (with 331 four-baggers) when he retired.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1930 19 DET AL 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 -100 0 0 0
1933 22 DET AL 117 449 59 135 33 3 12 87 6 2 46 78 .301 .367 .468 118 210 2 1
1934 23 DET AL 153 593 118 201 63 7 26 139 9 5 63 93 .339 .404 .600 156 356 9 2
1935 24 DET AL 152 619 121 203 46 16 36 170 4 3 87 91 .328 .411 .628 169 389 4 0
1936 25 DET AL 12 46 10 16 6 2 1 16 1 0 9 6 .348 .455 .630 165 29 0 0
1937 26 DET AL 154 594 137 200 49 14 40 183 8 3 102 101 .337 .436 .668 172 397 2 3
1938 27 DET AL 155 556 144 175 23 4 58 146 7 5 119 92 .315 .438 .683 170 380 3 3
1939 28 DET AL 138 500 112 156 42 7 33 112 8 3 91 95 .312 .420 .622 155 311 11 2
1940 29 DET AL 148 573 129 195 50 8 41 150 6 3 93 75 .340 .433 .670 170 384 3 1
1941 30 DET AL 19 67 12 18 5 1 2 12 1 0 16 12 .269 .410 .463 121 31 0 0
1945 34 DET AL 78 270 47 84 20 2 13 60 3 1 42 40 .311 .404 .544 167 147 0 0
1946 35 DET AL 142 523 91 145 29 5 44 127 5 1 80 88 .277 .373 .604 163 316 1 0

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 12 1930 1946 1269 4791 980 1528 366 69 306 1202 748 771 .319 .412 .616 58 26 161

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TOMMY BRIDGES

Pitcher, 1930-1946

#10

bridges.jpg

--Class of 1950--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 12/28/1906

Died - 4/19/1968

Biography:

Definitely in the argument for being the greatest right-handed hurler in Detroit Tigers history, Tommy Bridges became so because he didn’t follow the path his father and grandfather created for him. And because he didn’t become a doctor, the Tigers had a pitcher that won 194 games during his 16-year career with Detroit. Despite his lack of stature, Bridges had a large hand that allowed him to break off a wicked curve ball, one that was considered the best in baseball for many seasons. Bridges was a quiet but well liked and respected player among both fans and teammates, and it is easy to see why. Betweeen 1934 and 1936 he accumulated 66 wins; never posting less than 21 victories in that time period. Bridges also led the American League in strikeouts in 1935 and 1936. He was, at times, as good as anyone in baseball, tossing 33 shutouts and hurling one-hitters on three different occasions. In one of those games -- an August 5, 1932 contest against the Washington Senators -- he came within a single out of a perfect game, when Senators pinch hitter Dave Harris singled with two outs in the bottom of the ninth. The game ended one batter later. Throughout his career, Bridges was a clutch pitcher and is the one of only two Tigers to ever play with four World Series teams while with Detroit. Perhaps his greatest feat came in the top of the ninth inning during Game 6 of the 1935 World Series. With the score tied at 3-3, Chicago’s Stan Hack opened the top of the ninth inning with a triple. Bridges retired the next three batters in order, stranding Hack on third. In the bottom of the ninth, the Tigers responded with the game-winning run and Detroit’s first World Championship. Called into military service years later, Bridges missed most of two seasons and was finally let go in 1946, under the belief that he was "washed up" because of the missed wartime seasons. It didn’t deter Bridges. He went to the Pacific Coast League, pitching another five seasons. While there, at the age of 42, he posted a league-leading 1.64 ERA and also tossed a no-hitter. A member of the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame, Bridges also scouted for the Tigers from 1958 to 1960.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1930 23 DET AL 3 2 8 5 2 0 2 0 37.7 28 18 17 4 23 17 0 0 158 4.06 118 1.354
1931 24 DET AL 8 16 35 23 8 2 8 0 173.0 182 120 96 13 108 105 0 9 809 4.99 92 1.676
1932 25 DET AL 14 12 34 26 10 4 7 1 201.0 174 95 75 14 119 108 1 6 881 3.36 140 1.458
1933 26 DET AL 14 12 33 28 17 2 4 2 233.0 192 102 80 8 110 120 6 2 984 3.09 140 1.296
1934 27 DET AL 22 11 36 35 23 3 1 1 275.0 249 117 112 16 104 151 3 3 1153 3.67 120 1.284
1935 28 DET AL 21 10 36 34 23 4 1 1 274.3 277 129 107 22 113 163 3 5 1195 3.51 119 1.422
1936 29 DET AL 23 11 39 38 26 5 1 0 294.7 289 141 118 21 115 175 5 6 1272 3.60 137 1.371
1937 30 DET AL 15 12 34 31 18 3 2 0 245.3 267 129 111 15 91 138 3 4 1076 4.07 115 1.459
1938 31 DET AL 13 9 25 20 13 0 4 1 151.0 171 83 77 14 58 101 2 2 665 4.59 109 1.517
1939 32 DET AL 17 7 29 26 16 2 2 2 198.0 186 87 77 11 61 129 6 4 840 3.50 140 1.247
1940 33 DET AL 12 9 29 28 12 2 1 0 197.7 171 89 74 11 88 133 0 5 843 3.37 142 1.310
1941 34 DET AL 9 12 25 22 10 1 2 0 147.7 128 66 56 10 70 90 1 2 630 3.41 134 1.341
1942 35 DET AL 9 7 23 22 11 2 1 1 174.0 164 66 53 6 61 97 4 5 742 2.74 144 1.293
1943 36 DET AL 12 7 25 22 11 3 3 0 191.7 159 57 51 9 61 124 0 3 774 2.39 147 1.148
1945 38 DET AL 1 0 4 1 0 0 2 0 11.0 14 6 4 2 2 6 0 2 48 3.27 108 1.455
1946 39 DET AL 1 1 9 1 0 0 6 1 21.3 24 16 14 5 8 17 1 1 95 5.91 62 1.500

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 16 1930 1946 194 138 .584 3.57 424 362 47 200 33 10 2826.3 2675 1321 1122 181 1192 1674 126

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HAL NEWHOUSER

Pitcher, 1939-1953

"Prince Hal"

#16

newhouser_hal.jpg

--Class of 1955--

Bats - Left

Throws - Left

Born - 5/20/1921

Died - 11/10/1998

Biography:

A sandlot star from Detroit, "Prince" Hal Newhouser was offered more money from the Cleveland Indians during the depression. However, feeling an obligation to Detroit scout Wish Egan, who first discovered Newhouser on the Detroit fields when he was 16, the local boy made good and signed with the Tigers for $4,000 -- $11,000 less than the Indians were offering. Because of this decision, he went on to became the greatest pitcher in Tigers' history. It didn’t start that way. Youthful Newhouser had a strong opening season but never really put it together until 1942, when the Tigers signed utility catcher Paul Richards to replace war-bound Birdie Tebbetts. It worked. Richards got Newhouser to overcome the battle between his ears and the frustrations with what Hal considered poor play by his teammates behind him, and got the southpaw to settle down and think positively. Rejected from military service because of a heart problem, Newhouser suddenly became a new player and probably posted the three best consecutive seasons by a hurler in team history. Once mentally and emotionally stable, Newhouser had it all. In full command of a blazing fastball and an effective curve and slider, Newhouser was named the American League MVP in 1944 after posting a 29-9 record with a 2.22 ERA. He followed that up with another MVP performance in 1945, recording a 25-9 mark with a 1.81 ERA. He also won two World Series games that October, as Detroit defeated the Chicago Cubs four games to two to win their second World Championship. He could have easily won a third MVP in 1946, when he recorded a 26-9 mark and a 1.94 ERA. Newhouser, who won ERA titles and led the league in strikeouts twice, was selected to seven consecutive All-Star games at one time, finishing as baseball’s winningest pitcher of the Forties with 170 victories. He also finished the decade with an MLB best 1,579 strikeouts. One of only four Tigers to finish his career with at least 200 victories (he hit that number exactly), Newhouser was selected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veteran’s Committee in 1992.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1939 18 DET AL 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 5.0 3 3 3 0 4 4 0 3 22 5.40 91 1.400
1940 19 DET AL 9 9 28 20 7 0 3 0 133.3 149 81 72 12 76 89 2 1 613 4.86 98 1.688
1941 20 DET AL 9 11 33 27 5 1 5 0 173.0 166 109 92 6 137 106 1 5 810 4.79 95 1.751
1942 21 DET AL 8 14 38 23 11 1 14 5 183.7 137 73 50 4 114 103 2 2 789 2.45 161 1.367
1943 22 DET AL 8 17 37 25 10 1 9 1 195.7 163 88 66 3 111 144 0 3 850 3.04 116 1.400
1944 23 DET AL 29 9 47 34 25 6 10 2 312.3 264 94 77 6 102 187 1 4 1271 2.22 161 1.172
1945 24 DET AL 25 9 40 36 29 8 2 2 313.3 239 73 63 5 110 212 0 10 1261 1.81 195 1.114
1946 25 DET AL 26 9 37 34 29 6 2 1 292.7 215 77 63 10 98 275 1 8 1176 1.94 188 1.069
1947 26 DET AL 17 17 40 36 24 3 4 2 285.0 268 105 91 9 110 176 2 11 1216 2.87 132 1.326
1948 27 DET AL 21 12 39 35 19 2 4 1 272.3 249 109 91 10 99 143 1 5 1146 3.01 145 1.278
1949 28 DET AL 18 11 38 35 22 3 3 1 292.0 277 118 109 19 111 144 0 3 1228 3.36 124 1.329
1950 29 DET AL 15 13 35 30 15 1 5 3 213.7 232 110 103 23 81 87 4 4 929 4.34 108 1.465
1951 30 DET AL 6 6 15 14 7 1 0 0 96.3 98 47 42 10 19 37 3 1 393 3.92 106 1.215
1952 31 DET AL 9 9 25 19 8 0 2 0 154.0 148 72 64 13 47 57 0 3 643 3.74 102 1.266
1953 32 DET AL 0 1 7 4 0 0 1 1 21.7 31 22 17 4 8 6 2 1 102 7.06 58 1.800

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 15 1939 1953 200 148 .575 3.07 460 373 64 212 33 19 2944.0 2639 1181 1003 134 1227 1770 130

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DIZZY TROUT

Pitcher, 1939-1952

#11

dizzy_trout.jpg

--Class of 1955--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 6/29/1915

Died - 2/28/1972

Biography:

Utilizing a true country flavor with his attitude and his speech, Paul Howard "Dizzy" Trout became one of the great pitchers of the 1940s. Known for a red handkerchief that stuck out of his back pocket while he was pitching, he combined with teammate Hal Newhouser to make up what became arguably the greatest 1-2 mound punch in Tigers' history. From 1943 to 1946, Trout usually overpowered American League hitters with his blazing fastball and slider, posting an 82-54 mark and completing 82 of the 133 games he started, including a league-best 33 complete games in 1944. That season was his best ever. He posted a 27-14 record, leading the league with a 2.12 ERA, and finished second in the American League MVP voting right behind Newhouser. Trout showed his durability during the Tigers’ 1945 World Championship season, at one point pitching in six games during a nine-game stretch, winning four of them. Perhaps due to a bet that he could lift a 365-pound barrel, or perhaps due to his great workload (he once pitched at least 246 innings for five straight seasons), Trout ended up suffering from a bad back and declined in later seasons. However, his time in Detroit didn’t end on the field. Dizzy's country wit worked well on radio, and he spent three seasons between 1953 and 1955 as the color man, where his baseball stories were legendary.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1939 24 DET AL 9 10 33 22 6 0 6 2 162.0 168 82 65 5 74 72 4 5 716 3.61 136 1.494
1940 25 DET AL 3 7 33 10 1 0 6 2 100.7 125 60 50 4 54 64 3 3 469 4.47 107 1.778
1941 26 DET AL 9 9 37 18 6 1 11 2 151.7 144 76 63 7 84 88 2 4 671 3.74 122 1.503
1942 27 DET AL 12 18 35 29 13 1 5 0 223.0 214 98 85 15 89 91 4 8 965 3.43 115 1.359
1943 28 DET AL 20 12 44 30 18 5 14 6 246.7 204 83 68 6 101 111 0 6 1019 2.48 142 1.236
1944 29 DET AL 27 14 49 40 33 7 6 0 352.3 314 104 83 9 83 144 4 2 1421 2.12 168 1.127
1945 30 DET AL 18 15 41 31 18 4 9 2 246.3 252 108 86 8 79 97 0 5 1041 3.14 112 1.344
1946 31 DET AL 17 13 38 32 23 5 6 3 276.3 244 85 72 11 97 151 3 2 1142 2.34 155 1.234
1947 32 DET AL 10 11 32 26 9 2 6 2 186.3 186 85 72 6 65 74 3 2 795 3.48 109 1.347
1948 33 DET AL 10 14 32 23 11 2 6 2 183.7 193 87 70 6 73 91 2 3 803 3.43 127 1.448
1949 34 DET AL 3 6 33 0 0 0 24 3 59.3 68 35 29 2 21 19 0 1 261 4.40 94 1.500
1950 35 DET AL 13 5 34 20 11 1 6 4 184.7 190 84 77 13 64 88 5 0 791 3.75 124 1.375
1951 36 DET AL 9 14 42 22 7 0 17 5 191.7 172 98 86 13 75 89 1 4 797 4.04 103 1.289
1952 37 DET AL 1 5 10 2 0 0 4 1 27.0 30 16 16 4 19 20 0 2 128 5.33 72 1.815

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 14 1939 1952 161 153 .513 3.20 493 305 126 156 28 34 2591.7 2504 1101 922 109 978 1199 125

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GEORGE KELL

Third Baseman, 1946-1952

Broadcaster, 1959-1996

#21

george_kell.jpg

--Class of 1955--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 8/23/1922

Biography:

Born in a little town in Arkansas called Swifton, George Kell came to Detroit in 1946 by way of a trade by Philadelphia Athletics’ owner Connie Mack, a trade that changed the face of Tiger baseball for almost a half-century. Arguably the greatest third baseman in team history, Kell combined determination and a clean-cut lifestyle to make him an outstanding defensive player as well as a terrific hitter for seven years with the Tigers. When his playing career was over, he worked just as hard at his craft as a radio announcer, a second career with the organization that began in 1959 for Kell. Serving as Van Patrick’s partner during a handful of contests that season, Kell went on to work with Ernie Harwell from 1960 until 1963. He returned to the booth in 1965 as a TV commentator and held that role until 1996, becoming just as well known for his broadcasting as he ever did for his on-the-field exploits. Kell was well known for his slight southern drawl; his "Hello everybody – I’m George Kell" became a familiar sound to millions of Tigers fans for many years. But his first gift was at third base. He batted over .300 in every full season with Detroit. In 1949, he batted a league-best .343, beating out Ted Williams on the last day of the season for the American League batting title. He led the AL in hits twice and was the league leader in doubles in 1950 and 1951. Never a great power hitter, Kell nonetheless drove in 101 runs in 1950 and scored at least 90 three times in Detroit. A four-time All-Star as a Tiger, he also completed one of the greatest defensive plays in Tiger history during the 1948 season. During the play, Kell had his jaw broken by a Joe DiMaggio line drive. Instinctively, he picked up the ball, crawled to third, and got the force out before fainting. It was just this type of determination that made Kell great and earned him a spot in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1946 23 DET AL 105 434 67 142 19 9 4 41 3 2 30 14 .327 .371 .440 120 191 13 0
1947 24 DET AL 152 588 75 188 29 5 5 93 9 11 61 16 .320 .387 .412 119 242 10 3
1948 25 DET AL 92 368 47 112 24 3 2 44 2 2 33 15 .304 .369 .402 103 148 8 5
1949 26 DET AL 134 522 97 179 38 9 3 59 7 5 71 13 .343 .424 .467 136 244 16 3
1950 27 DET AL 157 641 114 218 56 6 8 101 3 3 66 18 .340 .403 .484 123 310 16 1
1951 28 DET AL 147 598 92 191 36 3 2 59 10 3 61 18 .319 .386 .400 113 239 11 4
1952 29 DET AL 39 152 11 45 8 0 1 17 0 1 15 13 .296 .359 .368 102 56 4 0

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 7 1946 1952 826 3303 503 1075 210 35 25 414 337 107 .325 .391 .433 34 27 119

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WALTER BRIGGS, SR.

Owner, 1936-1952

President, 1936-1952

Minority Owner, 1920-1935

briggs.jpg

--Class of 1955--

Born - 2/27/1877

Died - 1/17/1952

Biography:

Before the start of the 1908 World Series, Walter Briggs was upset. He was unable to get a ticket to the games in Detroit's cozy Bennett Park. Frustrated, the owner of the Briggs Manufacturing Company found a way to meet Tigers owner Frank Navin to get the tickets he craved. It also was the seeding of Briggs’ ultimate goal – to own the Tigers. Briggs became a minority owner in 1920 and for the next 30+ seasons put his inimitable stamp on the Tigers' organization. A fan first, Briggs wanted to see a winner on the field first and foremost. He gave Frank Navin the money necessary to lure Mickey Cochrane to the Tigers before the start of the 1934 season. Though it was Navin who announced plans to expand the ballpark that carried his namesake following the 1935 World Championship, he died soonafter, and it was Briggs who became the fulltime owner and who ultimately realized Navin's plans. He often said that his ultimate goal was to give Detroit the finest park in the country. With the addition of double-decking around the entire outfield in 1938, seating capacity of the newly renamed Briggs Stadium eventually reached 53,000. It was with these renovations that gave the park the look it has had for many decades. The field’s conditions were considered above average and it was Briggs that pioneered the idea to use a nylon tarpaulin to cover the infield during rainstorms. He also installed baseball’s first underground sprinkling system. He initially resisted installing lights, but was about to go ahead with it when the United States entered World War II. Instead of installing the lights, he donated the steel to the war effort. When he finally got around to the idea again in 1948, he made sure the Tigers had the best lighting system in baseball. Briggs’ tenure had its lows. The Tigers were found guilty of hiding minor league players through a system of illegal contracts and red tape. The Tigers were ordered to release 91 players, and the team was forced to pay over $47,000 to 15 others. Briggs was also slow to sign African-American players. At the time of his death, the Tigers had yet to sign a black ball player, which helped to exacerbate for one of the toughest eras in Tigers history, the 1950s. But Briggs' teams had many high points on the field as well. A co-owner when the Tigers went to the World Series in 1934 and 1935, he was the team's sole owner when they won the 1940 AL crown in one of the greatest pennant races in baseball history. That magical season ended with a loss to the Cincinnati Reds in the World Series. The squad finished second in 1944 in another great pennant race, and followed that up with the team's seventh pennant and second World Championship in 1945. The Tigers finished second in 1946, 1947 and in 1950, only to post the organization’s then-worst-ever season in 1952 in the wake of Briggs' death on January 17 of that year. Win or lose, and he did plenty of winning, Briggs was one thing before anything. He was a fan’s fan that just happened to own the team.

Executive Record:

[b]Year	Team	W	L	WP	Finish	Champs[/b]
1936 Detroit 83 71 .539 2
1937 Detroit 89 65 .578 2
1938 Detroit 84 70 .545 4
1939 Detroit 81 73 .526 5
[b]1940 Detroit 90 64 .584 1 AL[/b]
1941 Detroit 75 79 .487 4
1942 Detroit 73 81 .474 5
1943 Detroit 78 76 .506 5
1944 Detroit 88 66 .571 2
[b]1945 Detroit 88 65 .575 1 WS[/b]
1946 Detroit 92 62 .597 2
1947 Detroit 85 69 .552 2
1948 Detroit 78 76 .506 5
1949 Detroit 87 67 .565 4
1950 Detroit 95 59 .617 2
1951 Detroit 73 81 .474 5

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TY TYSON

Broadcaster, 1927-1952

tytyson.jpg

--Class of 1955--

Born - 5/11/1888

Died - 12/12/1968

Biography:

Truly one of the pioneers, Edwin "Ty" Tyson helped establish the standards that future baseball radio broadcasters were measured by. Using a no-frills style, as was typical of his era, Tyson worked for WWJ radio and in 1927 became the Tigers' first announcer (doing his first game on April 19 that year). Tyson became beloved throughout Michigan as the original "voice of the Tigers." He was precise with his words and could not be called a "homer" by any stretch, usually reporting the action just as it occurred. As was the practice of the day, he was a master at taking telegraph tape and "reconstructing" the game for road contests. As admired as any announcer in Tiger history, Tyson was a part of the first "silencing" controversy in team history. In 1934, as the Tigers prepared for the World Series, baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Landis intended to prohibit Tyson from calling the games because of partiality concerns. Landis soon found out how loyal Tyson’s fans were, receiving 600,000 letters of protest to his office. Decades later, Tigers fans flocked in support of another broadcast hero – Ernie Harwell – after he was shockingly given his walking papers. In Tyson's case, Landis surrendered, and the "voice of the Tigers" was allowed to call the Fall Classic on WWJ. A year later, Tyson joined NBC's World Series staff, where he remained for two seasons. He retired in 1942, having only missed one game during his radio career, but returned to do the first televised Tiger games from 1947 until 1952. To celebrate his 25th anniversary of broadcasting, Detroit Mayor Edward Jeffries proclaimed May 26, 1947 to be "Ty Tyson Day." Years later, on Father's Day in 1965, Ernie Harwell had Tyson do an inning for old time's sake. It was such a success that Ernie invited him back several times over. A member of the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame, Tyson's name lives on most noticeably as the namesake of an annual award that the Detroit Sports Broadcasters Association gives out in his honor.

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VIRGIL TRUCKS

Pitcher, 1941-1956

"Fire"

#22

virgiltrucks.jpg

--Class of 1960--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 4/26/1917

Biography:

Virgil "Fire" Trucks was all heat, as his nickname suggests. Armed with a blazing fastball and a terrific slider, he was known for his ability to go right at the opposition, with Trucks typically getting the better of his foes. He made an immediate impact in Detroit. During his rookie season he went 14-8 while posting a 2.74 ERA, and had compiled 30 victories with the Tigers before leaving for the service. Once back, he continued his impressive showing in the Old English D. His return to baseball came only a week after coming back from the service, and just in time to make one regular season start and then two World Series appearances. He responded by tossing a complete game victory in Game Two. The Tigers went on to defeat the Cubs in seven games and claim their second World Championship. In 1949, Trucks posted an American League best 2.68 ERA while striking out 153 batters -- also tops in the league. Later, in 1952, Trucks had one of the strangest performances in baseball history. On what was at the time the worst team in franchise history, Virgil went just 5-19 but tossed two no-hitters. The second hitless contest occurred at a mostly empty Briggs Stadium. That’s because General Douglas MacArthur was involved in a parade through downtown Detroit that day. Trucks was eventually traded after the 1952 season, only to return in 1956 for one final season. He completed his Tiger career with 114 victories, 22 of them shutouts.

Pitching:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP[/B]
1941 24 DET AL 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.0 4 2 2 0 0 3 0 0 8 9.00 51 2.000
1942 25 DET AL 14 8 28 20 8 2 8 0 167.7 147 64 51 3 74 91 2 7 721 2.74 144 1.318
1943 26 DET AL 16 10 33 25 10 2 6 2 202.7 170 72 64 11 52 118 1 1 817 2.84 124 1.095
1945 28 DET AL 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5.3 3 1 1 0 2 3 0 0 19 1.69 209 0.938
1946 29 DET AL 14 9 32 29 15 2 1 0 236.7 217 94 85 23 75 161 3 5 992 3.23 113 1.234
1947 30 DET AL 10 12 36 26 8 2 5 2 180.7 186 105 91 14 79 108 2 5 800 4.53 83 1.467
1948 31 DET AL 14 13 43 26 7 0 9 2 211.7 190 97 89 14 85 123 2 7 901 3.78 115 1.299
1949 32 DET AL 19 11 41 32 17 6 8 4 275.0 209 95 86 16 124 153 4 3 1133 2.81 148 1.211
1950 33 DET AL 3 1 7 7 2 1 0 0 48.3 45 20 19 6 21 25 1 0 209 3.54 132 1.366
1951 34 DET AL 13 8 37 18 6 1 8 1 153.7 153 81 74 9 75 89 5 6 680 4.33 96 1.484
1952 35 DET AL 5 19 35 29 8 3 5 1 197.0 190 99 87 12 82 129 7 5 858 3.97 96 1.381
1956 39 DET AL 6 5 22 16 3 1 3 1 120.0 104 56 51 15 63 43 6 3 515 3.83 108 1.392

[B]YR From To W L WL% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ERA+[/B]
TOTALS 12 1941 1956 114 96 .543 3.50 316 229 53 84 20 13 1800.7 1618 786 700 123 732 1046 113

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RAY BOONE

Third Baseman, 1953-1958

"Ike"

#8

ray_boone.jpg

--Class of 1960--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 7/27/1923

Died - 10/17/2004

Biography:

The first of three generations of major league Boones, Ray "Ike" Boone would rather make the balls fly off his bat than fly himself. At a time when commercial flight was still in its infancy, Boone feared flying, but had no trouble sending a baseball flying over the fences. Boone was moved from shortstop to third base after he was traded to Detroit to take advantage of his strong arm but limited range. It worked. He hit 22 home runs in 101 games in 1953, and went on to slug at least 20 homers in each of his first five seasons with the squad. A line drive hitter who reportedly devoured curveballs, Boone led the American League with 116 RBI in 1955. And while he was a two-time All-Star during his Tiger career, he did not appear in the midsummer classic during that RBI-leading 1955 season. In 1954 -- one of his All-Star seasons -- Boone finished with a .295 average and 20 four-baggers. In 1956 he batted a career best .308 while knocking 25 over the fences. As the man that replaced George Kell at third about a year after Kell’s departure, Boone did a fine job of doing just that.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1953 29 DET AL 101 385 73 120 16 6 22 93 2 1 48 47 .312 .395 .556 155 214 5 5
1954 30 DET AL 148 543 76 160 19 7 20 85 4 2 71 53 .295 .376 .466 132 253 2 2
1955 31 DET AL 135 500 61 142 22 7 20 116 1 1 50 49 .284 .346 .476 122 238 2 1
1956 32 DET AL 131 481 77 148 14 6 25 81 0 0 77 46 .308 .403 .518 142 249 2 3
1957 33 DET AL 129 462 48 126 25 3 12 65 1 1 57 47 .273 .353 .418 108 193 4 3
1958 34 DET AL 39 114 16 27 4 1 6 20 0 2 14 13 .237 .323 .447 104 51 2 1

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 6 1953 1958 683 2485 351 723 100 30 105 460 317 255 .291 .372 .482 8 7 130

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HARVEY KUENN

Shortstop, 1952-1959

#7

harveykuenn.jpg

--Class of 1960--

Bats - Right

Throws - Right

Born - 12/4/1930

Died - 2/28/1988

Biography:

Few could make contact with a baseball better than Harvey Kuenn did during his time in Detroit. Kuenn was signed while attending the University of Wisconsin, and made his debut in 1952 by batting .325 in limited action. That was a just a precursor of what was to come. During his eight-year Tiger career, the fun-loving Kuenn batted over .300 in all but one season. He was Rookie of the Year in 1954, clouting 209 hits and posting a .308 batting average. He followed that up with 201 hits in 1953, and never again had less than 173 in his seasons with the Tigers. Kuenn wasn't known for his ability to draw a free pass, but he hardly ever struck out, going down on strikes only 51 times during his 4,372 at-bats in Detroit. Never a great defensive player, Kuenn's bat nonetheless ensured that he would be standing between the bases for a good chunk of the game. He usually hit the ball on a line, leading the American League in doubles three times. Kuenn was also an admired teammate. Sometimes called "Slug" because he never seemed rattled, Harvey was also well known for the large chaw of tobacco he always seemed to have in his cheek. Kuenn's value as a teammate was proven when he helped a young teenager named Al Kaline adjust to life in the major leagues. "We were both young and he made me feel like part of the team," Kaline later said. Kuenn's best with Detroit was probably his last. Moved to center field, the eight-time Tiger All-Star led the American League with a .353 batting average in 1959, slugging .501. However, his time in Detroit was about to end. During the offseason, he was involved in a batting-champ-for-home-run-champ trade that brought Rocky Colavito to the Motor City. Once traded, Kuenn didn’t experience the same success again, until years later as a manager when he skippered his home state Milwaukee Brewers to the World Series in 1982.

Hitting:

[B]Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP[/B]
1952 21 DET AL 19 80 2 26 2 2 0 8 2 1 2 1 .325 .349 .400 107 32 2 1
1953 22 DET AL 155 679 94 209 33 7 2 48 6 5 50 31 .308 .356 .386 101 262 1 1
1954 23 DET AL 155 656 81 201 28 6 5 48 9 9 29 13 .306 .335 .390 100 256 6 1
1955 24 DET AL 145 620 101 190 38 5 8 62 8 3 40 27 .306 .347 .423 109 262 0 1
1956 25 DET AL 146 591 96 196 32 7 12 88 9 5 55 34 .332 .387 .470 126 278 0 3
1957 26 DET AL 151 624 74 173 30 6 9 44 5 8 47 28 .277 .327 .388 93 242 6 0
1958 27 DET AL 139 561 73 179 39 3 8 54 5 10 51 34 .319 .373 .442 118 248 3 0
1959 28 DET AL 139 561 99 198 42 7 9 71 7 2 48 37 .353 .402 .501 142 281 3 1

[B]YR From To G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG SB CS OPS+[/B]
TOTALS 8 1952 1959 1049 4372 620 1372 244 43 53 423 322 205 .314 .360 .426 51 43 112

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