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2007 All-Time Adopt-A-Tiger Selection Thread!!!

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I used to love how George Kell would always say his name, "Chester Lemon is coming to bat with the bases loaded." It was always Chester and never Chet with him.

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I'm on business in Washington, DC and haven't had much time to be on here the past 2 days. However, I did get a chance to talk to my grandma tonight in GR. She shared some fond memories she had with my grandpa at spring training watching the Tigers get ready for the season. During the conversation I asked her who grandpa's favorite Tiger was, because I never got the chance to ask him before he passed away last May. After thinking for a little while she named some famous Tigers. I told her about the draft and the process involved selecting our favorite players. After I finished, she said she knew who grandpa would pick and I'm glad this player hasn't been picked.

So, with pick # 28, I'm picking

  • a Tiger in honor of my late grandpa who was a huge Detroit Tigers fan
  • a Tiger who served in the US armed forces, like myself and my grandpa in WWII

My 2007 All-Time Adopt-A-Tiger:

Hank Greenberg

Henry Benjamin "Hammerin' Hank" Greenberg (January 1, 1911 – September 4, 1986), was a Jewish-American baseball player in the 1930s and '40s.

A first baseman primarily for the Detroit Tigers, Greenberg was one of the premier power hitters of his generation. He hit fifty-eight home runs in 1938, the most in one season by any player between 1927, when Babe Ruth set a record of sixty, and 1961 when Roger Maris surpassed it. He was a five-time All-Star, was twice named the American League's Most Valuable Player, and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1956.

He is also notable for being the first Jewish superstar in American professional sports.[1] He garnered national attention in 1934 when he refused to play baseball on Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement, even though the Tigers were in the middle of a pennant race.

Greenberg was born in New York City to an Orthodox Jewish family. He attended James Monroe High School in the Bronx, where he was an outstanding all-around athlete. His preferred sport was baseball, and his preferred position was first base.

In 1929, he was recruited by the New York Yankees, who already had a capable first baseman: Lou Gehrig. Greenberg turned them down and instead attended New York University for a year, after which he signed with the Detroit Tigers for $9,000.

Greenberg played minor league baseball for three years.

Greenberg played 17 games in 1930 for Hartford, then played at Raleigh, North Carolina where he hit .314 with 19 home runs.

In 1931, he played at Evansville in the Three I League (.318, 15 homers, 85 RBIs).

In 1932, at Beaumont in the Texas League, he hit 39 homers with 131 RBIs, won the MVP award, and led Beaumont to the Texas League title.

During the season, one of his teammates (Jo-Jo White) walked slowly around Greenberg, staring at him. Greenberg asked him what he was looking at. White said he was just looking, as he'd never seen a Jew before. "The way he said it," noted Greenberg, "he might as well have said, 'I've never seen a giraffe before.'" I let him keep looking for a while, and then I said, 'See anything interesting?'" Looking for horns and finding none, White said, "You're just like everyone else."

In 7 of the 9 years in which he was active, he was one of the dominant players in the game. He has the 8th highest slugging percentage lifetime of any ballplayer in major league history, at .605, ahead of such sluggers as Mark McGwire and Joe DiMaggio.

In 1930 he was the youngest player in the majors when he first broke in, at 19.

In 1933, he rejoined the Tigers and hit .301 while driving in 87 runs. At the same time, he was third in the league in strikeouts (78).

In 1934, his second major-league season, he hit .339 and helped the Tigers reach their first World Series in 25 years. He led the league in doubles, with 63. He was 3rd in the AL in slugging percentage (.600) -- behind Jimmy Foxx and Lou Gehrig, but ahead of Babe Ruth, and in RBIs (139).

Late in the 1934 season, he announced that he would not play on Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Fans grumbled, "Rosh Hashanah comes every year but the Tigers haven't won the pennant since 1909." Greenberg did considerable soul-searching, and discussed the matter with his rabbi; finally he relented and agreed to play on Rosh Hashanah, but stuck with his decision not to play on the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur. Of the latter decision, a sportswriter expressed the general opinion in a poem in which he used the Irish (and thus Catholic) names Murphy and Mulroney. He ended the poem with the lines "We will miss him on the field and we will miss him at the bat/But he is true to his religion and I honor him for that." In more recent years, Sandy Koufax likewise declined to play on Yom Kippur.

In 1935 Greenberg led the league in RBIs (170) and total bases (389), tied Foxx for the AL title in home runs (36), was 2nd in the league in doubles (46), triples (16), and slugging percentage (.628), and was 3rd in the league in runs scored (121). He also led the Tigers to their first World Series title. He was voted the American League's Most Valuable Player.

In 1937 Greenberg was voted to the All-Star Team. He led the AL by driving in 183 runs (3rd all-time, behind Hack Wilson in 1930 and Lou Gehrig in 1931), while batting .337 with 200 hits. He was 2nd the league in home runs (40), doubles (49), total bases (397), slugging percentage (.668), and walks (102). Still, Greenberg came in only 3rd in the vote for MVP.

A prodigious home run hitter, Greenberg narrowly missed breaking Babe Ruth's single-season home-run record in 1938, when he was again voted to the All-Star Team and hit 58 home runs, leading the league for the second time. The story goes that several pitchers intentionally walked Greenberg towards the end of the season rather than give a Jewish man a chance to break Babe Ruth's record. (There is some reason to dispute this as a motive. It is true that the Cleveland Indians did not give Greenberg good pitches to hit during the last week of the season; it is also true that Detroit and Cleveland were battling for third place, which in those days carried with it a share of World Series profits, so Cleveland players had a financial interest in keeping Greenberg from hitting home runs.)

He also led the league in runs scored (144) and at-bats per home run (9.6), tied for the AL lead in walks (119), was 2nd in RBI (146), slugging percentage (.683), and total bases (380), and was also 3rd in OBP (.438). Still, Greenberg came in only 3rd in the vote for MVP.

In 1939 Greenberg was voted to the All-Star Team for the third year in a row. He was 2nd in the league in home runs (33), 3rd in the AL in doubles (42) and slugging percentage (.622), while leading the league in strikeouts (95).

After moving to the outfield in 1940, Greenberg was voted to the All-Star Team for the 4th year in a row. He led the league in home runs (41; for the third time in 6 years), RBIs (150), doubles (50), total bases (384), and slugging percentage (.670; 44 points ahead of Joe DiMaggio). He was second in the league behind Ted Williams in runs scored (129) and OBP (.433), all while batting .340 (5th best in the AL). He led the Tigers to a pennant, and won his 2nd American League MVP award, becoming at the time only the second player ever to win the MVP award at two different positions.

The Detroit draft board initially classified Greenberg as 4F for "flat feet." Rumors that he had bribed the board, and concern that he would be likened to Jack Dempsey, who received negative publicity for failure to serve in World War I, led Greenberg to be reexamined, and he was found fit to serve.

Although drafted in 1940, he was honorably discharged after Congress released men aged 28 years and older from service, being released on December 5, 1941, two days before Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Greenberg re-enlisted and volunteered for service in the United States Army Air Forces. He graduated from Officer Candidate School and was commissioned as a first lieutenant. He eventually served overseas in the Republic of China-Burma-India theater, scouting locations for B-29 bases.

Greenberg remained in uniform until the summer of 1945. Without the benefit of spring training, he returned to the Tigers, was again voted to the All-Star Team, and helped lead them to a come-from-behind American League pennant, clinching it with a grand-slam home run on the final game of the season.

In 1946 he returned to peak form, leading the league in home runs (44) and RBIs (127), both for the 4th time. He was 2nd in slugging percentage (.604) and total bases (316), behind Ted Williams.

In 1947, Greenberg and the Tigers had a lengthy salary dispute. When Greenberg decided to retire rather than play for less, Detroit traded him to the Pittsburgh Pirates. To persuade him not to retire, Pittsburgh made Greenberg the first baseball player to earn over $100,000 in a season (though the exact amount is a matter of some dispute). Team co-owner Bing Crosby recorded a song, "Goodbye, Mr. Ball, Goodbye" with Groucho Marx and Greenberg, to celebrate Greenberg's arrival. The Pirates also moved in the seats in Forbes Field's cavernous left field, renaming the section "Greenberg's Gardens," to accommodate Greenberg's pull-hitting style. Greenberg played first base for the Pirates for 1947, and was one of the few opposing players to publicly welcome Jackie Robinson to the majors.

That year he tied for the league lead in walks, with 104. He had a .408 on base percentage, and was also 8th in the league in home runs and 10th in slugging percentage. Nevertheless, the Pirates released him after the season.

As a fielder, the 6'4" Greenberg was awkward and unsure of himself early in his career, but he mastered his first-base position through countless hours of practice. Over the course of his career, he had a higher than average fielding percentage and range at first base. When asked to move to left field in 1940 to make room for Rudy York, he worked tirelessly to master that position as well, and reduced his errors in the outfield from 15 in 1940 to 0 in 1945.

Greenberg felt that runs batted in were more important than home runs. He would tell his teammates, "just get on base," or "just get the runner to third," and he would do the rest.

Starring as a first baseman and outfielder with the Detroit Tigers (1930, 1933-46), and briefly with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1947), he played only 9 full seasons. He missed 3 full seasons and most of 2 others to military service during World War II, and missed most of another season with a broken wrist.

It is often estimated that Greenberg, had he played in another era uninterrupted by war, would have amassed between 500 and 600 home runs and 1,800 to 2,000 RBI. As it is, his totals of 331 home runs and 1,276 RBI are amazing for a 1,394-game career. He also hit for average, batting .313.

The following year, Greenberg retired from the field to become the Cleveland Indians' farm system director and two years later, their general manager and part-owner along with Bill Veeck. His contributions in finding and developing talent contributed to that team's successes through the 1950s, though Bill James wrote that Greenberg should also be given partial credit for the Indians' late 1950s collapse due to questionable personnel decisions.[1] He followed Veeck to the Chicago White Sox as part-owner.

Greenberg sold off his share of the White Sox in 1961 after the American League announced plans to put a team in Los Angeles. He immediately became the favorite to become the new team's first owner, and persuaded Veeck, who had sold off his majority interest in the White Sox due to poor health, to join him as his partner. However, when Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley got word of these developments, he threatened to scuttle the whole deal by invoking his exclusive rights to operate a major league team in Southern California. In truth, O'Malley wanted no part of having to compete against an expansion team owned by a master promoter such as Veeck. Greenberg wouldn't budge, and pulled out of the running for what became the Los Angeles Angels (now the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim). He later became a successful investment banker.

American League Most Valuable Player, 1935 and 1940.

American League All-Star team, 1937-1940.

First Jewish player elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, in 1956. He garnered 85% of the votes.

In 1983, the Tigers celebrated "Greenberg-Gehringer Day" at Tiger Stadium, honoring Greenberg with the retirement of his uniform number 5 and former teammate Charlie Gehringer with the retirement of his number 2. Both players were on hand for the ceremony.

In 1999, despite injuries and wartime service that essentially limited him to half a career, he ranked Number 37 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team.

Member of the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame (1996).

Member of the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame (1979).

Greenberg was a sports icon in the Jewish American community.

Greenberg was not the first Jewish man to play major-league baseball, but by the end of his career he had become by far the best Jewish player ever, and the first major Jewish star. In the 50 years since Greenberg's retirement, only Sandy Koufax achieved similar success among Jewish players.

Greenberg was subject to the most vicious ethnic taunting seen in the sport prior to the arrival of Jackie Robinson in 1947, yet Greenberg nevertheless became a first-rank ballplayer. While playing in his last year for the Pirates, he told Robinson what to expect as a minority from a baseball player's point of view.

Greenberg lacked coordination as a youngster, and flat feet prevented him from running fast. But he worked diligently to overcome his inadequacies and became a basketball standout in high school, helping Monroe win the city championship.

The anti-Semitism Greenberg faced ranged from players staring at him because they had never before seen a Jew, to coarse racial epithets hurled at him. Particularly abusive were the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1934 World Series. Examples of this were: "Hey Mo," referring to Moses, and "Throw a pork chop he can't hit that," referring to laws of Kashrut.

Greenberg sometimes retaliated against the racial attacks, once going into the Chicago White Sox clubhouse to challenge manager Jimmy Dykes, and on another occasion calling out the entire Yankee team.

Jewish fans in Detroit -- and around the American League for that matter -- took to Greenberg almost at once, offering him everything from free meals to free cars, all of which he refused.

On Sept. 19, 1937, he hit the first-ever homer into the center field bleachers at Yankee Stadium.

After being passed over for the All-Star team in 1935 and being left on the bench for the 1937 game, Greenberg refused to participate in the 1938 contest after being named to the AL team.

In 1938 he homered in four consecutive at-bats over two games.

In Greenberg's first game back after being discharged, he homered on July 1, 1945.

That year, he set the major league record with 11 multi-homer games. Sammy Sosa tied Greenberg's mark in 1998.

Jackie Robinson said of Greenberg, "Class tells. It sticks out all over Mr. Greenberg."

In 23 World Series games, he hit .318 with five homers and 22 RBI.

Greenberg was one of the few baseball people to testify on behalf of Curt Flood in 1970 when the outfielder challenged the reserve clause.

Greenberg died of cancer in Beverly Hills, California and his remains were entombed at Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery in Culver City, California.


Year Ag Tm Lg G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG *OPS+ TB SH SF IBB HBP GDP
+--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+---+---+---+---+
1930 19 DET AL 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 -100 0 0 0
1933 22 DET AL 117 449 59 135 33 3 12 87 6 2 46 78 .301 .367 .468 118 210 2 1
1934 23 DET AL 153 593 118 201 63 7 26 139 9 5 63 93 .339 .404 .600 156 356 9 2 MVP-6
1935 24 DET AL 152 619 121 203 46 16 36 170 4 3 87 91 .328 .411 .628 169 389 4 0 MVP-1
1936 25 DET AL 12 46 10 16 6 2 1 16 1 0 9 6 .348 .455 .630 165 29 0 0
1937 26 DET AL 154 594 137 200 49 14 40 183 8 3 102 101 .337 .436 .668 172 397 2 3 MVP-3,AS
1938 27 DET AL 155 556 144 175 23 4 58 146 7 5 119 92 .315 .438 .683 170 380 3 3 MVP-3,AS
1939 28 DET AL 138 500 112 156 42 7 33 112 8 3 91 95 .312 .420 .622 155 311 11 2 8 MVP-18,AS
1940 29 DET AL 148 573 129 195 50 8 41 150 6 3 93 75 .340 .433 .670 170 384 3 1 15 MVP-1,AS
1941 30 DET AL 19 67 12 18 5 1 2 12 1 0 16 12 .269 .410 .463 121 31 0 0 1
1945 34 DET AL 78 270 47 84 20 2 13 60 3 1 42 40 .311 .404 .544 167 147 0 0 9 MVP-14,AS
1946 35 DET AL 142 523 91 145 29 5 44 127 5 1 80 88 .277 .373 .604 163 316 1 0 17 MVP-8
1947 36 PIT NL 125 402 71 100 13 2 25 74 0 104 73 .249 .408 .478 132 192 0 4 16
+--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+---+---+---+---+
13 Seasons 5193 1628 71 1276 26 844 .313 .412 .605 158 35 0 0 16 66
1394 1051 379 331 58 852 3142
+--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+---+---+---+---+
162 Game Avg 603 122 189 44 8 38 148 7 3 99 98 .313 .412 .605 158 365 4 0 0 2 8
Career High 155 619 144 203 63 16 58 183 9 5 119 101 .340 .438 .683 172 397 11 0 0 4 17

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hank_Greenburg

http://www.baseball-reference.com/g/greenha01.shtml

Greenberg_Hank.jpg

HGreenberg.jpg

Greenberg_Hank_2.jpg

card_hank_greenberg.jpg

38099.jpg

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I think I'm on the clock but I'm not going to have a chance to do this until tomorrow night. So, just skip over me and I'll jump in later.
Just type in two words...

a first name and a last name.

Done!

The old K.I.S.S. principle, but I elected to ellaborate.

On clock:

#29 - Charles Liston (no problem if you bust your time, but you're still on the clock)

#30 - whitecapwendy

Get ready:

#31 - NATE

#32 - treyKemper

#33 - mancity09

#34 - lesgoblue02

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I think since he was too lazy to type two words, that Nate should be put on the clock.

That and I am getting really close....

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I was hoping Hank would fall another 10 spots. He too, was my grandpa's favorite and he handed down an autographed baseball he got from him at the ballpark as a kid. I have a large autograph collection but that is by far my most treasured piece.

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I was hoping Hank would fall another 10 spots. He too, was my grandpa's favorite and he handed down an autographed baseball he got from him at the ballpark as a kid. I have a large autograph collection but that is by far my most treasured piece.

Thanks for sharing your story. I really had a great conversation with my grandma tonight. She named off some others I could have chosen that grandpa liked (Norm Cash, Mickey Lolich, Bill Freehan), but by far, Hank was my grandpa's favorite. I'm glad he was still available to pick b/c my grandma insisted that I pick him.

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My 2007 All-Time Adopt-A-Tiger:

Hank Greenberg

Fabulous selection! I was really torn between Greenberg and Gehringer with my pick, so I changed course and went with Ernie. Greenberg was a great player and person.

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With the 30th pick in the All Time Adopt a Tiger draft, WhitecapWendy chooses:

12576.jpg

Tom Brookens

Tom Brookens was born August 10, 1953 in Chambersburg, PA. This 5’10”, 170 lb right handed third baseman was the first round draft choice of the Detroit Tigers (4th overall) in 1975. He made his major league debut for the Tigers on July 10, 1979, and played his last game on September 30, 1990 with the Cleveland Indians. Of his 12 years in the major leagues, he spent 10 years with the Detroit Tigers (1979-1988), one year with the New York Yankees (1989) and one with the Cleveland Indians (1990). He had a career average of .246, a career OPS+ of 83, and a career fielding percentage of .950. As a Tiger, in 3543 at bats he had 445 runs, 871 hits, 175 2B, 38 3B, 69 HR, 392 RBIs, stole 85 bases, and was caught stealing 54 times giving him an average over the 10 years of .246.

Tom best year was 1980 when his AVE was .275, and his OPS+ was 98. He had one game that stood out above all the rest. When the Tigers played the Milwaukee Brewers on August 20, 1980, Tom went 5-5 with a triple and a home run. Not only did he have a big game offensively, but defensively he started a rare triple play, helping to insure the Tigers 8-6 victory over the Brewers. 1980 may have been his best season, but Tiger fans remember Tom Brookens best as the third baseman on the “Bless You Boys” 1984 World Series champion Tiger team.

Tom will never forget being in the minor leagues under the management of Jim Leyland in July of 1979. He shared the story recently in front of a crowd of West Michigan Tiger fans. He had not had a good night that night at the plate nor in the field. After the game, he was called into Manager Leyland’s office. When Leyland invited him to take a seat, young Brookens said he was so nervous, he looked for electrical cords that might be attached to the chair. Mr. Leyland looked him straight in the eye, and said, “I am going to tell you straight. The ball club has been forced to give up your contract.” Brookens hung his head, “I know I made a couple errors tonight.” “Three to be exact,” Mr Leyland retorted. Brookens looked at Leyland with a pleading look in his eyes, “But I thought I was having a pretty decent season.” Jim Leyland finally decided to put Tom out of his misery. There was probably a bit of a twinkle in Leyland’s eye as he said “We have been forced to give up your contract, because Detroit has purchased it.”

After completing the 1990 season, Tom decided to retire from baseball to make his family his priority. Once his twin daughters went to college, he realized he still loved baseball, and was hired by the Tigers to manage in the minor leagues. An interesting tidbit—Tom Brookens has a twin brother named Tim, who was also drafted in the first round (18th overall) as an outfielder for the Texas Rangers.

Brookens was the manager of the short season A Oneonta Tigers for the 2005-2006 seasons. In 2005, he led the Tigers to 48-27 record and a Stedler Division Championship. In 2006, he led the O-Tigers to a 40-34 record and second place in the division.

Before the short season club began in mid-June, Tom helped out for a month in West Michigan where the West Michigan Whitecaps had lost their hitting coach. In 2007, Tom will return to West Michigan to become the Whitecap’s manager.

I am looking forward to following my All time AAT, Tom Brookens as he develops as a manager, and hope to get a few stories out of him throughout the season.

11-06-06TomBrookens3.jpg

Tom Brooken's stats

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I think since he was too lazy to type two words, that Nate should be put on the clock.

That and I am getting really close....

I heartily disagree with you. Laziness had nothing to do with it. Perhaps we took all his choices, and he wants to use some time to decide on his pick, and he is allowed 24 hours until the rules state otherwise. Patience my good man.

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I will do an extensive write up on Tanana when time permits. He deserves one.
Nice pick, he and Dan Petry are my two favorite Tigers pitchers. Runner-ups would be Bridges and Morris.

11-06-06TomBrookens3.jpg

HEY! THE PENNSYLVANIA POKER !!!!

:classic:

:classic:

:classic:

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he should have played his whole career with the Tigers.

So what is your opinion of the other picks that have been made, mine included, that are players with careers that included other teams?

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So what is your opinion of the other picks that have been made, mine included, that are players with careers that included other teams?

Well, I understand that players sometimes need to go where the dollars go. But I do like loyalty too. I think that's what makes Alan Trammell, Lou Whitaker and Al Kaline so special to fans...they all seem like "Mr. Tiger." I respect people like Bernie Williams who sounds like he'd rather retire than leave the Yankees...or the George Brett's or Robin Yount's.

It doesn't mean I don't like the ones that got away...sometimes there is lousy management or no money or the team isn't loyal to the player and that makes a player jump. Just for my particular pick...I wanted to meet that criteria.

As a side note, for years I didn't like Jack Morris, because he had been a favorite of mine and then he seemed to dis the Tigers as he left (especially going to the hated Twins...although its his hometown team). When I found out that he might have been one of those free agents caught up in the collusion scandal, I felt a little more sympathy for him. Sometimes there are circumstances that force a player to turn on his team.

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...although its his hometown team.

Morris played for 14 seasons for the Tigers. The fact that he went to the Twins for ONE season...yes only one...does not make my pick any less valid than yours (and I'm not talking about legally valid. I'm talking about, "I'm better than you" valid!)!

He played 1 season with the Twins...2 for Toronto, and 1 for Cleveland...I count 14 seasons for the Tigers, and (1+2+1 = 4) FOUR seasons on teams OTHER than the tigers!.

I think that's what makes Alan Trammell, Lou Whitaker and Al Kaline so special to fans]

What make them special to fans is the same thing that makes Joe Dumars special to fans...what makes Ernie Harwell special to fans...What makes Isiah Thoms special to fans...

It's the battles that this person has witnessed. Not longevity. I give (to use a Pistons metaphore) Vinnie Johnson a ton of credit as a "Piston". Why not a guy that spent 14 years w/ the Tigers, and 4 on other teams? Do your research!

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...The fact that he went to the Twins for ONE season...yes only one...does not make my pick any less valid than yours (and I'm not talking about legally valid. I'm talking about, "I'm better than you" valid!)!

...Why not a guy that spent 14 years w/ the Tigers, and 4 on other teams? Do your research!

Why are you bashing on Motownphilly? He hasn't said anything whatsoever inflammatory. Did you miss this part:

...It doesn't mean I don't like the ones that got away...sometimes there is lousy management or no money or the team isn't loyal to the player and that makes a player jump. Just for my particular pick...I wanted to meet that criteria...

???

He selected a lifelong Tiger simply because that's what he wanted as part of his criteria. Everyone has their own personal reasons for making their selection. Why don't you get off his case?

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Originally Posted by ClintD

...The fact that he went to the Twins for ONE season...yes only one...does not make my pick any less valid than yours (and I'm not talking about legally valid. I'm talking about, "I'm better than you" valid!)!

...Why not a guy that spent 14 years w/ the Tigers, and 4 on other teams? Do your research!

Why are you bashing on Motownphilly? He hasn't said anything whatsoever inflammatory. Did you miss this part:

Quote:

Originally Posted by motownphilly

...It doesn't mean I don't like the ones that got away...sometimes there is lousy management or no money or the team isn't loyal to the player and that makes a player jump. Just for my particular pick...I wanted to meet that criteria...

???

He selected a lifelong Tiger simply because that's what he wanted as part of his criteria. Everyone has their own personal reasons for making their selection. Why don't you get off his case?

I also meant nothing inflamatory! His criteria are as good as ANYONE's criteria. However, I thought, the crieterion that you had to be a life-time tiger was unfair. My All-Time-Tiger is not, so I used him as an example. NO SPITE INTENDED...just making a counterpoint!

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I also meant nothing inflamatory! ...NO SPITE INTENDED...just making a counterpoint!

Maybe. But if so... the following comments: "does not make my pick any less valid than yours (and I'm not talking about legally valid. I'm talking about, "I'm better than you" valid!)" and "Do your research!", aren't exactly counterpoints.

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Maybe. But if so... the following comments: "does not make my pick any less valid than yours (and I'm not talking about legally valid. I'm talking about, "I'm better than you" valid!)" and "Do your research!", aren't exactly counterpoints.

You're right...you pintpointed my inferiority complex. However....I think Jack Morris is a valid counterpoint to the "Life-time Tiger" apprpoach.

There is no wrong or no right...thank you 84 Lives!...for pointing out my mistakes as well!

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147570.jpg

Rocky Colavito

If you followed the Tigers by radio in the early 1960's one of the enduring memories is the sheer joy with which Ernie Harwell pronounced the names of two particular players: Chico Fernandez, and Rocky Colavito. Although Colavito only played for the Tigers for 4 years of his major league career, they were his peak years in terms of offensive performance and he was a key ingredient in one of the strongest offensive teams ever assembled in Detroit. Take a look at that devilishly handsome face in the photo above and it is easy to see why Rocky had a substantial following of female fans throughout his career.

Colavito started his career with Cleveland and by rights probably should have stayed there. Here is a selection from the article about him at Baseball Library:

Few players captured the imagination of a town the way Rocky Colavito did Cleveland. The 6'3", boyishly handsome strongman from the Bronx had a charisma that made him the most memorable personality in Indians history; he was voted so in 1976. He reached 300 home runs faster than all but four players; he was 31 when he hit number 300.

Colavito came up with best buddy Herb Score in 1955, but stayed just five games. Called back to Cleveland in July 1956, he began a string of 11 straight seasons of more than 20 homers, averaging 32 a year. His numbers really soared when manager Joe Gordon convinced him to cut down his swing. Colavito made himself a complete player, a run-producing slugger and a right fielder with an arm comparable to that of Roberto Clemente. Colavito was prone to slumps, and the Cleveland fans would jump all over him. That's when one sportswriter first starting saying, "Don't knock the Rock."

In 1958 Colavito batted .303 with 41 homers and 113 RBI. In 1959 he became the first Indian to have two 40-HR seasons; his 42 tied him with Harmon Killebrew for the AL lead. That June 10, he hit four HR in consecutive at-bats in a game at Baltimore. Cleveland fans were stunned when GM Frank Lane sent him to Detroit for batting champion Harvey Kuenn the following April; Lane had actually had a clause in Colavito's 1959 contract that would have rewarded the slugger for hitting fewer than 40 homers. After a year of adjustment in Detroit in 1960 (he had only 87 RBI), Colavito had his greatest season, hitting .290 with 45 HR and 140 RBI.

http://www.baseballlibrary.com/ballplayers/player.php?name=Rocky_Colavito_1933

Hitting .290 with 45 HR and 140 RBI tells part of the story, but not all of it; he hit those 45 homers while striking out only 75 times, against 113 walks. His OBP was .402 and his SLG was .580, and that 1961 season is one of the great single seasons by a Tiger in the past half-century.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/c/colavro01.shtml

The last of my aunts and uncles, Vicki, died last year at the age of 94. She was a Cleveland Indians fan; in my hometown of Thorold, Ontario everyone rooted for either the Yankees (they had the best Italians) or the Indians (closest bus trip to a weekend series). In the 1950's of course Vicki's favourite player was Rocky Colavito and she was pretty ticked when they traded him. That mistake was partially corrected when Cleveland reacquired the Rock towards the end of his career, but in the meantime Tiger fans were treated to a lot of enjoyable baseball. So for me and Vicki both I am taking the Rock with my AAT pick.

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