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Bo don't know Ernie

Historical Photos of Briggs Stadium

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I'd guess the number would be zero. But it does make for a good legend, a fun part of the history of the corner.

Any chance the Mythbuster's would tackle this one?

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I remember a game back in 1998, when Higginson was playing right field at Tiger Stadium. Rick Reed was an umpire in that game; he was at first base.

A ball was hit to right field. It looked like a long fly ball that would be caught at the fence. In fact, Higginson caught it on the warning track. But the umpire ruled that it was a home run. I remember Higginson was livid and ran all the way in from right field to argue with Reed about it, and eventually he was thrown out of the game ofr it. A replay showed that the ball barely touched the facing of the upper deck as it was coming down (there was no bounce) and, therefore, it was a home run; from Higgy's view, it was a fly ball that just missed the facing and he caught it.

When I've heard the overhang legend, I've always heard about right fielders being the biggest gripers about the overhang "stealing" home runs from what would be a routine flyout otherwise.

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Any chance the Mythbuster's would tackle this one?

We better get this request in quickly.

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I remember a game back in 1998, when Higginson was playing right field at Tiger Stadium. Rick Reed was an umpire in that game; he was at first base.

A ball was hit to right field. It looked like a long fly ball that would be caught at the fence. In fact, Higginson caught it on the warning track. But the umpire ruled that it was a home run. I remember Higginson was livid and ran all the way in from right field to argue with Reed about it, and eventually he was thrown out of the game ofr it. A replay showed that the ball barely touched the facing of the upper deck as it was coming down (there was no bounce) and, therefore, it was a home run; from Higgy's view, it was a fly ball that just missed the facing and he caught it.

When I've heard the overhang legend, I've always heard about right fielders being the biggest gripers about the overhang "stealing" home runs from what would be a routine flyout otherwise.

Still that slight touch to the facing makes it tough to judge whether the ball would have been a homerun without the overhang. Even the slightest touch at that point in the flight could change the direction of the ball and take off anywhere from very little to quite a bit off of the flight of the ball.

A simple change in the amount of spin and you can comepletely change the tragectory.

I wouldn't be shocked if we drew up a model of the flight of that ball and found that it would have been a homerun.

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How high was the overhang, in relation to the playing field? If it was, say, 30 feet, that gives you two points on the parabola (Fence,0) (Fence-10,30), plus the starting point at home plate (0,0)

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One thing I don't get is all the talk about the RF overhang adding to home runs totals there. If the overhang was only 10 feet, doesn't seem possible? I'm guessing it was at least 50-60 feet above field level ???

PS Great Photos !!!!!!!!

34 feet.

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