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    JACK MORRIS

    Pitcher, 1977-1990
    #47


    --Class of 1990--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Right
    Born - 5/16/1955


    Biography:

    A Minnesota native, Jack Morris has always been fond of hunting. And that fondness wasn't limited to nature. He did a ton of hunting against opposing batters during his 14-year career at Tiger Stadium. The winningest pitcher of the 1980s, Morris won 162 games for the Tigers during that decade, tossing at least 197 innings in every year but 1989. Morris was a fierce competitor. It was a fire that showed he cared, but at other times it rubbed his manager Sparky Anderson and teammates the wrong way. He wasn't a fan of the media either. Sometimes his emotions got the best of him on the mound, but more often than not it was the other way around, and Morris finished 154 of the 408 games he started in a Tigers' uniform. He armed himself with a fastball, slider, and later a split-finger fastball. The splitter helped him to four All-Star Game appearances during his tenure as a Tiger, but it also resulted in scores of wild pitches and passed balls. In fact, he threw at least ten wild pitches in every year of is Tigers career past 1982, leading the league four times. The three best consecutive seasons of his career surely began in 1985. During that period, Morris threw over 250 innings every year, with an ERA never higher than 3.38. He reached his career high-water mark for wins in 1986, posting 21 victories in the Old English D. In 1984 he also started blazingly hot, with nine straight winning verdicts, including a first-week no-hitter against the Chicago White Sox in Comiskey. Despite cooling off considerably, he still found time to go 19-11 that season. He posted a 3-0 mark in three postseason starts during the Tigers' World Championship run in 1984, and went on to post a 1-1 record in the 1987 ALCS. Seemingly always among the league leaders in strikeouts, Morris struck out at least 200 batters three times as a Tiger. Since leaving the team, Morris spent some time doing television broadcasts for the Tigers, but is now a commentator for his hometown team, the Minnesota Twins. He was named The Sporting News American League Pitcher of the Year during the strike-shortened 1981 season, in which he went 14-7. Morris went on to win the Babe Ruth Award in 1984.


    Pitching:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP
    1977	22	DET	AL	1	1	7	6	1	0	0	0	45.7	38	20	19	4	23	28	0	2	189	3.74	115	1.336
    1978	23	DET	AL	3	5	28	7	0	0	10	0	106.0	107	57	51	8	49	48	3	4	469	4.33	90	1.472
    1979	24	DET	AL	17	7	27	27	9	1	0	0	197.7	179	76	72	19	59	113	4	9	806	3.28	133	1.204
    1980	25	DET	AL	16	15	36	36	11	2	0	0	250.0	252	125	116	20	87	112	4	6	1074	4.18	99	1.356
    1981	26	DET	AL	14	7	25	25	15	1	0	0	198.0	153	69	67	14	78	97	2	2	798	3.05	124	1.167
    1982	27	DET	AL	17	16	37	37	17	3	0	0	266.3	247	131	120	37	96	135	0	10	1107	4.06	101	1.288
    1983	28	DET	AL	20	13	37	37	20	1	0	0	293.7	257	117	109	30	83	232	3	18	1204	3.34	117	1.158
    1984	29	DET	AL	19	11	35	35	9	1	0	0	240.3	221	108	96	20	87	148	2	14	1015	3.60	109	1.282
    1985	30	DET	AL	16	11	35	35	13	4	0	0	257.0	212	102	95	21	110	191	5	15	1077	3.33	122	1.253
    1986	31	DET	AL	21	8	35	35	15	6	0	0	267.0	229	105	97	40	82	223	0	12	1092	3.27	127	1.165
    1987	32	DET	AL	18	11	34	34	13	0	0	0	266.0	227	111	100	39	93	208	1	24	1101	3.38	126	1.203
    1988	33	DET	AL	15	13	34	34	10	2	0	0	235.0	225	115	103	20	83	168	4	11	997	3.94	97	1.311
    1989	34	DET	AL	6	14	24	24	10	0	0	0	170.3	189	102	92	23	59	115	2	12	743	4.86	78	1.456
    1990	35	DET	AL	15	18	36	36	11	3	0	0	249.7	231	144	125	26	97	162	6	16	1073	4.51	88	1.314
    	        
            YR	From	To	W	L	WL%	ERA	G	GS	GF	CG	SHO	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	ERA+
    TOTALS	14	1977	1990	198	150	.569	3.73	430	408	10	154	24	0	3042.7	2767	1382	1262	321	1086	1980	108
    VT - RIP BB

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    LANCE PARRISH

    Catcher, 1977-1986
    "Big Wheel"
    #13


    --Class of 1990--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Right
    Born - 6/15/1956


    Biography:

    One time during the offseason, Lance Parrish's part-time job as a bodyguard had him protecting Tina Turner for an assignment. During "Big Wheel's" career in Detroit, he probably did just as good a job protecting the plate. Converted from third to catcher early during his Tigers career, Parrish was the Tigers' first-round selection in the 1974 amateur draft. Already possessing a powerful bat, he worked hard to become a strong defensive presence behind the plate. He succeeded. A five-time Silver Slugger award-winner during his Tigers career, Parrish also won three consecutive Gold Gloves between 1983 and 1985. His first full season in the major leagues came in 1979, when he slugged 19 home runs while letting through 21 passed balls. However, his reputation as an all-around player quickly improved, and in 1980 Parrish was selected to the first of six All-Star games during his Tigers career, as he clouted 24 home runs, and drove in 82, and slowed down the opposition's running game with his cannon arm. One of the first players to heavily concentrate on body building, Parrish's conditioning program was initially met with a chilly response by manager Sparky Anderson. However, the hard work apparently paid off as he posted home run totals of 32, 27, 33, and 28 between 1982 and 1985. By then he was considered the best catcher in the American League, if not the best in baseball. During the Tigers' 1984 pennant run, Parrish drove in 98 runs despite batting just .237. He also clubbed a home run in both the ALCS and World Series that year. In fact, his home run in Game 5 of the '84 World Series plated the fifth run in an 8-4 victory that clinched the World Championship. The following year, Parrish got off to one of his best power seasons ever. He had 22 home runs and 62 RBI in just 91 games, when back problems eventually ended his season, and his career as a Tigers backstop. In 1987 he continued his career in Philadelphia, signing with the Phillies during the previous offseason. He went on to retired with the third-highest home run total ever by a catcher (324). After retirement, Lance returned to the club, as a coach during the managerial tenure of both Larry Parrish and Alan Trammell. He also briefly joined the broadcasting ranks, joining Frank Beckmann in the booth for WKBD in 2002.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1977	21	DET	AL	12	46	10	9	2	0	3	7	0	0	5	12	.196	.275	.435	87	20	0	0
    1978	22	DET	AL	85	288	37	63	11	3	14	41	0	0	11	71	.219	.254	.424	86	122	1	3
    1979	23	DET	AL	143	493	65	136	26	3	19	65	6	7	49	105	.276	.343	.456	112	225	3	2
    1980	24	DET	AL	144	553	79	158	34	6	24	82	6	4	31	109	.286	.325	.499	121	276	2	3
    1981	25	DET	AL	96	348	39	85	18	2	10	46	2	3	34	52	.244	.311	.394	99	137	1	0
    1982	26	DET	AL	133	486	75	138	19	2	32	87	3	4	40	99	.284	.338	.529	135	257	0	1
    1983	27	DET	AL	155	605	80	163	42	3	27	114	1	3	44	106	.269	.314	.483	119	292	0	1
    1984	28	DET	AL	147	578	75	137	16	2	33	98	2	3	41	120	.237	.287	.443	100	256	2	2
    1985	29	DET	AL	140	549	64	150	27	1	28	98	2	6	41	90	.273	.323	.479	118	263	3	2
    1986	30	DET	AL	91	327	53	84	6	1	22	62	0	0	38	83	.257	.340	.483	122	158	1	5
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	10	1977	1986	1146	4273	577	1123	201	23	212	700	334	847	.263	.317	.469	22	30	114
    VT - RIP BB

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    CHET LEMON

    Center Fielder, 1982-1990
    "The Jet"
    #34


    --Class of 1990--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Right
    Born - 2/12/1955


    Biography:

    Chet Lemon had some serious shoes to fill. He came to Detroit in a deal with Chicago that sent the ever-popular Steve Kemp to the White Sox. But it wasn't too long after the deal that Lemon became a fan favorite at The Corner. His great range in center and his solid arm made him a tremendous defensive presence. And while he was a .300 hitter with Chicago, his offensive contribution to the Tigers was one of consistent power. During his first year in Detroit, he clouted 19 home runs, and clubbed at least 17 in every season until 1989. Lemon was a hustler, and if he was up with two outs in the ninth inning, you could guarantee that he would be sliding into first base head-first. In the expansive Tiger Stadium outfield, Lemon's range was routinely above the league average. For awhile he was moved to right field to give Kirk Gibson a shot at playing the center, but that didn't last long as Lemon was simply a natural fit for Tiger Stadium's 440-foot fences. As an All-Star selection in 1984, Chet put together what was likely his best offensive season in what became a magical run to the Tigers' fourth World Championship. He went on to hit .287 that season, with 20 home runs. During the 1984 postseason, Lemon scored the pennant-clinching run in Game 3 of the ALCS, punching the Tigers' ticket to the World Series, where he batted .294. A member of the 1987 AL East champions, Lemon clouted 20 more round-trippers that season while knocking in 64 RBI. He batted .278 during the five games of the ALCS that season, pounding another two postseason home runs. Lemon never had issues with inside pitches, leading the American League in plunks in 1981, 1982, and finally 1983, when he was hit by a career-high 20 pitches. It was that sort of selfless production that made Chet Lemon one of the Tiger greats.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1982	27	DET	AL	125	436	75	116	20	1	19	52	1	4	56	69	.266	.368	.447	123	195	4	15
    1983	28	DET	AL	145	491	78	125	21	5	24	69	0	7	54	70	.255	.350	.464	126	228	4	20
    1984	29	DET	AL	141	509	77	146	34	6	20	76	5	5	51	83	.287	.357	.495	135	252	2	7
    1985	30	DET	AL	145	517	69	137	28	4	18	68	0	2	45	93	.265	.334	.439	111	227	0	10
    1986	31	DET	AL	126	403	45	101	21	3	12	53	2	1	39	53	.251	.326	.407	99	164	3	8
    1987	32	DET	AL	146	470	75	130	30	3	20	75	0	0	70	82	.277	.376	.481	130	226	0	8
    1988	33	DET	AL	144	512	67	135	29	4	17	64	1	2	59	65	.264	.346	.436	122	223	1	7
    1989	34	DET	AL	127	414	45	98	19	2	7	47	1	5	46	71	.237	.323	.343	90	142	2	8
    1990	35	DET	AL	104	322	39	83	16	4	5	32	3	2	48	61	.258	.359	.379	107	122	2	4
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	9	1982	1990	1203	4074	570	1071	218	32	142	536	468	647	.263	.349	.437	13	28	117
    VT - RIP BB

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    LOU WHITAKER

    Second Baseman, 1977-1995
    "Sweet Lou"
    #1


    --Class of 1995--

    Bats - Left
    Throws - Right
    Born - 5/12/1957


    Biography:

    For 19 seasons, it was a Detroit Tigers fans' own ritual: cheers of "Loooouuuu" filled Tiger Stadium anytime Louis Rodman Whitaker, Jr. came to the plate. And whether if it was because of his potent glove or because of his potent bat, fans got plenty of chances to cheer on one-half of baseball's most prolific double-play combination. "Sweet Lou" first came up for a cup of coffee in 1977, and by 1978 had really begun to make waves. Earning Rookie of the Year honors, Whitaker batted .285 with 58 RBI and a .361 on base percentage that season. His glove was equally as impressive, and the young second baseman consequently posted a range factor that was well above the American League average. As the years went on, Whitaker added power to his ever-growing arsenal. In 1983, he batted .320 while winning the first of his three Gold Gloves. By the following year, during the Tigers' 1984 World Championship season, he had established himself as the unquestioned table-setter in the lineup, and the team leapt out to a 35-5 start. He finished the year with a .289 average, 13 home runs, and his second of five All-Star appearances. Now a perennial double-digit home run hitter, in 1986 Whitaker became one of the members of the Tigers' vaunted 20-home run infield, each starting infielder having notched twenty round-trippers by year's end. Perhaps his best season, however, was 1991. That year, he clouted a career-best 28 home runs while driving in 85 runs. His power numbers are good for sixth in career home runs in a Tigers uniform (244, one behind Cecil Fielder), and fifth in doubles (420). Whitaker also ranks sixth in hits (2,369), fourth in runs scored (1,386), third in games played (2,390), eighth in RBI (1,084), and second in walks (1,197) on the organization's all-time list. A fairly quiet person, Whitaker was also known for occasional bouts of absent-mindedness, most notably when he forgot his uniform for the 1985 All-Star Game. He ended up puchasing a replica jersey at the stadium to complete his outfit that day. In the end, Whitaker's career numbers come close to mirroring his fellow double play partner, Alan Trammell. Perhaps fittingly, they were the two last players to set foot on the field during Tiger Stadium's closing ceremonies. All-told, Lou played an incredible 1,918 games with Trammell. After Joe Morgan, Whitaker became one of only two second basemen in baseball history to amass 2,000 games, 2,000 hits, and 200 home runs. A remarkable feat for one of the greatest players to ever don the Old English D -- replica jersey or otherwise.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1977	20	DET	AL	11	32	5	8	1	0	0	2	2	2	4	6	.250	.333	.281	67	9	1	0
    1978	21	DET	AL	139	484	71	138	12	7	3	58	7	7	61	65	.285	.361	.357	101	173	13	1
    1979	22	DET	AL	127	423	75	121	14	8	3	42	20	10	78	66	.286	.395	.378	108	160	14	1
    1980	23	DET	AL	145	477	68	111	19	1	1	45	8	4	73	79	.233	.331	.283	69	135	12	0
    1981	24	DET	AL	109	335	48	88	14	4	5	36	5	3	40	42	.263	.340	.373	103	125	3	1
    1982	25	DET	AL	152	560	76	160	22	8	15	65	11	3	48	58	.286	.341	.434	112	243	6	1
    1983	26	DET	AL	161	643	94	206	40	6	12	72	17	10	67	70	.320	.380	.457	133	294	2	0
    1984	27	DET	AL	143	558	90	161	25	1	13	56	6	5	62	63	.289	.357	.407	113	227	4	0
    1985	28	DET	AL	152	609	102	170	29	8	21	73	6	4	80	56	.279	.362	.456	124	278	5	2
    1986	29	DET	AL	144	584	95	157	26	6	20	73	13	8	63	70	.269	.338	.437	110	255	0	0
    1987	30	DET	AL	149	604	110	160	38	6	16	59	13	5	71	108	.265	.341	.427	106	258	4	1
    1988	31	DET	AL	115	403	54	111	18	2	12	55	2	0	66	61	.275	.376	.419	127	169	6	0
    1989	32	DET	AL	148	509	77	128	21	1	28	85	6	3	89	59	.251	.361	.462	133	235	1	3
    1990	33	DET	AL	132	472	75	112	22	2	18	60	8	2	74	71	.237	.338	.407	107	192	1	0
    1991	34	DET	AL	138	470	94	131	26	2	23	78	4	2	90	45	.279	.391	.489	142	230	2	2
    1992	35	DET	AL	130	453	77	126	26	0	19	71	6	4	81	46	.278	.386	.461	136	209	5	1
    1993	36	DET	AL	119	383	72	111	32	1	9	67	3	3	78	46	.290	.412	.449	133	172	7	4
    1994	37	DET	AL	92	322	67	97	21	2	12	43	2	0	41	47	.301	.377	.491	122	158	3	1
    1995	38	DET	AL	84	249	36	73	14	0	14	44	4	0	31	41	.293	.372	.518	128	129	0	2
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	19	1977	1995	2390	8570	1386	2369	420	65	244	1084	1197	1099	.276	.363	.426	143	75	117
    VT - RIP BB

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    KIRK GIBSON

    Right Fielder, 1979-1995
    "Gibby"
    #23


    --Class of 1995--

    Bats - Left
    Throws - Left
    Born - 5/28/1957


    Biography:

    Kirk Gibson was a hometown boy that was loved and hated throughout his career in Detroit, whether it was as a player, an announcer, or a coach. But what he undoubtedly did for the Tigers was provide many great memories, resulting in many more cheers than jeers. Born in Pontiac, he attended Michigan State where he became an All-American wide receiver. He only spent one season with the Spartans baseball team, but after being drafted by the Tigers, he decided to pursue baseball. Early in his pro career, he occasionally struggled with the bat and the glove, but he quickly became one of the Tigers' most feared power hitters and baserunners. In 1981 he showed a hint of his burgeoning talent, as he posted a .328 batting average while hitting nine home runs and driving in 40 RBI, nearly propelling the Tigers to the second-half division title in what was a strike-shortened season. Best friends with Tigers hurler Dave Rozema, the two men eventually became brothers-in-law when they married sisters. But while Rozema's career went stagnant, Gibby's propsered. In 1984 he finished sixth in the MVP voting after slugging 27 home runs, driving in 91 runs, and stealing 29 bases. He was named ALCS MVP later that season, posting a .417 average en route to the Fall Classic. However, it was during Game 5 of the World Series at Tiger Stadium that he recorded the greatest hit of his Tigers career, clouting Goose Gossage's first pitch into the upper deck in right for a three-run homer, icing the Tigers' fourth World Championship. He flashed that great power consistently between 1984 and 1987, smashing at least 24 homers in each of those four seasons, to go along with no less than 26 stolen bases. He left the Tigers after the squad won the American League East in 1987, but returned in 1993 to notch two more solid years, along with an average one. Gibson ranks tenth on the Tigers' career home run list with 195 four-baggers, and sixth on the organization's all-time stolen base list with 194. He later joined Josh Lewin as a color commentator for the Tigers from 1998 to 2002 before becoming a bench coach for Alan Trammell in 2003. He remained in that position until halfway through the 2005 season, when he was briefly moved to hitting coach before leaving the organization entirely at the end of the year.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1979	22	DET	AL	12	38	3	9	3	0	1	4	3	3	1	3	.237	.256	.395	71	15	0	0
    1980	23	DET	AL	51	175	23	46	2	1	9	16	4	7	10	45	.263	.303	.440	100	77	1	1
    1981	24	DET	AL	83	290	41	95	11	3	9	40	17	5	18	64	.328	.369	.479	140	139	1	2
    1982	25	DET	AL	69	266	34	74	16	2	8	35	9	7	25	41	.278	.341	.444	114	118	1	1
    1983	26	DET	AL	128	401	60	91	12	9	15	51	14	3	53	96	.227	.320	.414	104	166	5	4
    1984	27	DET	AL	149	531	92	150	23	10	27	91	29	9	63	103	.282	.363	.516	142	274	3	8
    1985	28	DET	AL	154	581	96	167	37	5	29	97	30	4	71	137	.287	.364	.518	140	301	3	5
    1986	29	DET	AL	119	441	84	118	11	2	28	86	34	6	68	107	.268	.371	.492	133	217	1	7
    1987	30	DET	AL	128	487	95	135	25	3	24	79	26	7	71	117	.277	.372	.489	130	238	1	5
    1993	36	DET	AL	116	403	62	105	18	6	13	62	15	6	44	87	.261	.337	.432	107	174	0	4
    1994	37	DET	AL	98	330	71	91	17	2	23	72	4	5	42	69	.276	.358	.548	130	181	2	3
    1995	38	DET	AL	70	227	37	59	12	2	9	35	9	2	33	61	.260	.358	.449	109	102	0	3
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	12	1979	1995	1177	4170	698	1140	187	45	195	668	499	930	.273	.354	.480	194	64	125
    VT - RIP BB

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    SPARKY ANDERSON

    Manager, 1979-1995
    "Captain Hook"
    #11


    --Class of 1995--

    Born - 2/22/1934


    Biography:

    George "Sparky" Anderson was no dumb man. When given a contract to manage the Detroit Tigers early in the 1979 season, he had a five-year plan to get the Tigers to the World Series. Not coincidentally, that was the exact length of his first contract with the team. A master psychologist, Anderson is credited as the one that shaped, molded, and developed a bunch of young talented players into a respected group of professionals that propelled the Tigers to one of the greatest seasons in the organization's history. In 1984, his fifth season in Detroit, he led the Tigers to a 35-5 start en route to a wire-to-wire A.L. East title and the team's fourth World Championship. During his 17-year managerial reign in Detroit, Anderson recorded 1,331 wins while losing 1,248, making him the winningest manager in team history and helping him to notch a remarkable 2,194 total wins during his 26-year Hall of Fame career. In doing so, Anderson also became the only manager to lead two franchises in total victories -- Detroit and Cincinnati (863) -– and the first skipper to win Manager of the Year in both leagues. "When Sparky Anderson walks into a room, he immediately grabs your attention," said Alan Trammell. "You know he’s in charge." And Anderson's run of memorable seasons didn't end in 1984. After an 11-19 start to the 1987 season, the Tigers rebounded and captured the American League East title during the last weekend of the season, beating out second place Toronto both on the field and in the standings in a thrilling finish. Nicknamed Captain Hook for his tendency to lift his starting pitcher earlier than most (a strategy that most managers had adopted by the end of his career), he also tried to put hitters in beneficial positions. Many players were platooned. Rarely did a position player spend too much time on the bench. This approach kept everyone prepared. By the end of his career, however, Anderson and the Tigers fell on hard times. He found it increasingly difficult to remain patient with younger players, and the Tigers struggled as a result of their thinning talent. Then came the 1995 season, when Anderson refused to manage "scab" players during the ongoing players' strike. Reportedly these actions didn't please owner Mike Ilitch, and as a result Anderson was fired at the end of the season. But Sparky still has ties to Detroit. His charity, "CATCH", is one of his greatest achievements, and he continues to be active with the organization. And he has also made a few appearances at the ballpark. "Sparky Anderson Day" was held at Comerica Park, and he later threw the opening pitch during Game 2 of the 2006 World Series. Anderson achieved the ultimate honor when he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000.


    Managerial Record:

    Code:
    Year	League    	Team	Age	G	W	L	WP	Finish	Champs
    1979	AL East		Detroit	45	106	56	50	.528	5	
    1980	AL East		Detroit	46	163	84	78	.519	5	
    1981	AL East		Detroit	47	109	60	49	.550		
    1982	AL East		Detroit	48	162	83	79	.512	4	
    1983	AL East		Detroit	49	162	92	70	.568	2	
    1984	AL East		Detroit	50	162	104	58	.642	1	WS
    1985	AL East		Detroit	51	161	84	77	.522	3	
    1986	AL East		Detroit	52	162	87	75	.537	3	
    1987	AL East		Detroit	53	162	98	64	.605	1	DIV
    1988	AL East		Detroit	54	162	88	74	.543	2	
    1989	AL East		Detroit	55	162	59	103	.364	7	
    1990	AL East		Detroit	56	162	79	83	.488	3	
    1991	AL East		Detroit	57	162	84	78	.519	2	
    1992	AL East		Detroit	58	162	75	87	.463	6	
    1993	AL East		Detroit	59	162	85	77	.525	4	
    1994	AL East		Detroit	60	115	53	62	.461	5	
    1995	AL East		Detroit	61	144	60	84	.417	4	
    	        
            YR	From    To	G	W	L	WP	BstFin	WstFin	PostSsn	Pennts	WrldSer
    TOTALS	17	1979	1995	2580	1331	1248	.516	1	7	2	1	1
    VT - RIP BB

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    PAUL CAREY

    Broadcaster, 1973-1991


    --Class of 1995--

    Born -


    Biography:

    For years, two names always went together when you talked about Detroit Tiger baseball. For many Tigers fans, when you talk about the golden era of baseball radio, it begins and ends with Ernie Harwell and Paul Carey. The two paired up for almost 20 years broadcasting the sounds of summer on WJR. Nicknamed "4, 5, and 6" because those were the innings he did play-by-play, Carey's voice was rich, and widely considered a gift to radio. Getting his radio start in Mt. Pleasant and Saginaw, Carey moved to the Detroit area in 1956, when he became the sports director for WJR. During that time, he called University of Michigan and Detroit Pistons basketball games, and hosted a Friday night show in which he highlighted high school football scores. He joined the Tigers in 1973, just a year after the squad made it to the 1972 ALCS. Carey made his own postseason debut during the Tigers' magical run in 1984, but it was a bittersweet time for Carey. His wife Patti underwent cancer treatment that summer, and passed away before the start of the 1985 season. The big season called by Carey came in 1987, when the Tigers won the American League East but lost to the Minnesota Twins in the ALCS. His plan to retire after the 1991 season gave him a unique and somewhat controversial opportunity. His last appearance in the booth came in Baltimore, at the final game for the Orioles in historic Memorial Stadium. In the midst of reading the out-of-town scoreboard at the end of the game, Carey uncharacteristically quit reading scores and began noting all the former Baltimore greats as they walked onto the field as part of the closing ceremonies. "The heck with the scores. What's going on out on the field is more interesting." Little did fans in Baltimore and across baseball realize, it wasn’t just the end of a classic ballpark, but the end of what may have been the greatest radio tandem in baseball history.
    VT - RIP BB

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    JOHN FETZER

    Owner, 1960-1983
    President, 1960-1978
    Minority Owner, 1956-1960


    --Class of 1995--

    Born - 3/25/1901
    Died - 2/20/1991


    Biography:

    John Fetzer wanted baseball to be owned by the "common man" when he was owner of the Detroit Tigers. He accomplished his mission. Becoming a part-owner in 1956 and eventually taking over entire ownership in 1960, John Fetzer always felt that it was the fan that owned the Tigers; not him. He was merely the landlord. A television and radio pioneer, Fetzer used his expertise to land baseball a two-year, $12.2 million deal with ABC in 1964. The deal helped create financial stability for every team in baseball. He was a powerful owner, some suggesting the most powerful of his time, but he didn't exploit that power. Rather, he more often than not put the team's fate in the hands of people who he trusted, not the least of whom was his brilliant executive, Jim Campbell. "[Fetzer] loved the game dearly and was concerned about its future," said ex-American League president Lee MacPhail. "Even when he tried to remove himself from certain committees, we always convinced him that he had to stay. The owners recognized he was always looking out for the good of the game and not just the self interests of the Tigers." His habit of doing what was best for baseball usually paid dividends for the Tigers as well. He won his only World Championship in 1968, but throughout his tenure oversaw a team that was typically strong, if not an outright contender. The closest he came to a second world title came in 1972, when the Tigers clinched a spot in the American League Championship Series before losing three games to two to the Oakland Athletics. Fetzer sold the team in 1983 to Tom Monaghan, but remained as the team's Chairman of the Board long enough to see the squad win another World Series in 1984. By that time he was growing tired of the increasingly commercial and dollar-driven direction baseball was headed in. In the years previous, Fetzer had helped deliver the type of game he thought the fan wanted. And when it was all said and done, he did so successfully.


    Executive Record:

    Code:
    Year	Team	W	L	WP	Finish	Champs
    1960	Detroit	71	83	.461	6	
    1961	Detroit	101	61	.623	2	
    1962	Detroit	85	76	.528	4	
    1963	Detroit	79	83	.488	5	
    1964	Detroit	85	77	.525	4
    1965	Detroit	89	73	.549	4
    1966	Detroit	88	74	.543	3
    1967	Detroit	91	71	.562	2	
    1968	Detroit	103	59	.636	1	WS	
    1969	Detroit	90	72	.556	2	
    1970	Detroit	79	83	.488	4	
    1971	Detroit	91	71	.562	2	
    1972	Detroit	86	70	.551	1	DIV
    1973	Detroit	85	77	.525	3	
    1974	Detroit	72	90	.444	6	
    1975	Detroit	57	102	.358	6
    1976	Detroit	74	87	.460	5
    1977	Detroit	74	88	.457	4
    1978	Detroit	86	76	.531	5
    1979	Detroit	85	76	.528	5
    1980	Detroit	84	78	.519	4
    1981	Detroit	60	49	.550	
    1982	Detroit	83	79	.512	4
    1983	Detroit	92	70	.568	2
    VT - RIP BB

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    ALAN TRAMMELL

    Shortstop, 1977-1996
    "Tram"
    #3


    --Class of 2000--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Right
    Born - 2/21/1958


    Biography:

    For two full decades, shortstop wasn't an issue for the Detroit Tigers. Along with double play partner Lou Whitaker, Alan Stuart Trammell made up one of the most potent and durable double-play combinations in baseball history, as the tandem played a major league record 1,915 games together. Gifted with soft hands and a quick release, "Tram" won four Gold Gloves in five seasons (1980, 1981, 1983, and 1984). The six-time All-Star was potent with the bat as well, and his blossoming offensive skills earned him three Silver Slugger awards (1987, 1988, and 1990). Trammell's breakthrough year with the bat came in 1980, when he batted .300 for the first of seven times during his 20-year playing career. He eventually developed power as well. In 1983 he reached double-digits in homers for the first time, with 14 long-balls. He would continue to log double-digit home run totals for the next six seasons. In 1984, he missed 43 games due to a shoulder injury, but nonetheless finished fifth in American League batting race with a .314 average. But his greatest moment of 1984 may have came during the postseason. He batted .364 during the ALCS and then .450 during the World Series, earning the series MVP award at the conclusion of the Fall Classic. In 1987 he was moved to fourth in the lineup and delivered in a big way. He hit a career-best 28 homers that season, plating 105 runs while scoring 109 of his own. He also finished third in the A.L. with a .343 batting average on his way to finishing second in the MVP voting to Toronto's George Bell. And while he missed out on that award, he was bestowed with a personal honor at the end of the season from his double-play partner. On a Tiger Stadium base, Whitaker inscribed "To Alan Trammell, 1987 AL MVP. From Lou Whitaker." As the years went by, injuries began to take their toll on Trammell. He never played in more than 112 games in any given season after 1990, but did post some fine numbers during 1993 in limited duty, as he batted .329 with 60 RBI and 72 runs scored. Trammell remained for three more seasons but never regained his legendary durability. Three years after the end of his playing career, Trammell returned in 1999 as a coach. After a sojourn in San Diego, he was eventually named Tigers manager in 2003. Plagued by a lack of talent, Trammell's teams won only 186 games during his three years at the helm. A year later, Jim Leyland led the Tigers to the pennant, but the sudden success did nothing to sully Trammell's legend. That legend had already been cemented in the final quarter of the 20th century, at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1977	19	DET	AL	19	43	6	8	0	0	0	0	0	0	4	12	.186	.255	.186	21	8	1	0
    1978	20	DET	AL	139	448	49	120	14	6	2	34	3	1	45	56	.268	.335	.339	89	152	6	2
    1979	21	DET	AL	142	460	68	127	11	4	6	50	17	14	43	55	.276	.335	.357	85	164	12	0
    1980	22	DET	AL	146	560	107	168	21	5	9	65	12	12	69	63	.300	.376	.404	113	226	13	3
    1981	23	DET	AL	105	392	52	101	15	3	2	31	10	3	49	31	.258	.342	.327	91	128	16	3
    1982	24	DET	AL	157	489	66	126	34	3	9	57	19	8	52	47	.258	.325	.395	97	193	9	0
    1983	25	DET	AL	142	505	83	161	31	2	14	66	30	10	57	64	.319	.385	.471	138	238	15	0
    1984	26	DET	AL	139	555	85	174	34	5	14	69	19	13	60	63	.314	.382	.468	136	260	6	3
    1985	27	DET	AL	149	605	79	156	21	7	13	57	14	5	50	71	.258	.312	.380	90	230	11	2
    1986	28	DET	AL	151	574	107	159	33	7	21	75	25	12	59	57	.277	.347	.469	120	269	11	5
    1987	29	DET	AL	151	597	109	205	34	3	28	105	21	2	60	47	.343	.402	.551	155	329	2	3
    1988	30	DET	AL	128	466	73	145	24	1	15	69	7	4	46	46	.311	.373	.464	138	216	0	4
    1989	31	DET	AL	121	449	54	109	20	3	5	43	10	2	45	45	.243	.314	.334	85	150	3	4
    1990	32	DET	AL	146	559	71	170	37	1	14	89	12	10	68	55	.304	.377	.449	130	251	3	1
    1991	33	DET	AL	101	375	57	93	20	0	9	55	11	2	37	39	.248	.320	.373	91	140	5	3
    1992	34	DET	AL	29	102	11	28	7	1	1	11	2	2	15	4	.275	.370	.392	114	40	1	1
    1993	35	DET	AL	112	401	72	132	25	3	12	60	12	8	38	38	.329	.388	.496	138	199	4	2
    1994	36	DET	AL	76	292	38	78	17	1	8	28	3	0	16	35	.267	.307	.414	85	121	2	1
    1995	37	DET	AL	74	223	28	60	12	0	2	23	3	1	27	19	.269	.345	.350	81	78	3	0
    1996	38	DET	AL	66	193	16	45	2	0	1	16	6	0	10	27	.233	.267	.259	35	50	1	0
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	20	1977	1996	2293	8288	1231	2365	412	55	185	1003	850	874	.285	.352	.415	236	109	110
    VT - RIP BB

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    CECIL FIELDER

    First Baseman, 1990-1996
    "Big Daddy"
    #45


    --Class of 2000--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Right
    Born - 9/21/1963


    Biography:

    "Big Daddy" was as large in stature as he was a threat at the plate. Plucked from the obscurity of the Japanese leagues, the 250+ pound Cecil Grant Fielder rocked the baseball world in 1990 by clouting 51 home runs during his first season with the Tigers; the most in the American League since Roger Maris hit 61 in '61. Detroit's lovable slugger also became only the third player to clear Tiger Stadium's left-field roof. Fielder was an instant sensation during that 1990 season, and remained that way for most of his Tigers career. He led the league in home runs (44) and RBI (133) in 1991, and followed that by hitting 35 home runs and driving in a league-leading 124 runs in 1993. It marked his third straight RBI title. His monster homers – and monster strikeouts – continued throughout his career in Detroit. Along the way he became a three-time All-Star and a two-time Sliver Slugger recipient. Although his time in Detroit lasted less than seven full seasons, Fielder finds himself fifth on Tigers' all-time career home run list, with 245. Always a smile on his face, Cecil's love of the game was never in question. And he also had soft hands at first base. While he didn't have extraordinary range, his physical size belied solid defensive skills. He also proved to be incredibly durable, playing at least 154 games in each of his first four seasons with the Tigers, including a 1991 campaign in which he played every game. Never a part of a strong contender while with the Tigers, Big Daddy's feats soon became the main attraction at Tiger Stadium. And for the most part, the main attraction was well worth the price of admission.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1990	26	DET	AL	159	573	104	159	25	1	51	132	0	1	90	182	.277	.377	.592	167	339	0	5
    1991	27	DET	AL	162	624	102	163	25	0	44	133	0	0	78	151	.261	.347	.513	134	320	0	6
    1992	28	DET	AL	155	594	80	145	22	0	35	124	0	0	73	151	.244	.325	.458	117	272	0	2
    1993	29	DET	AL	154	573	80	153	23	0	30	117	0	1	90	125	.267	.368	.464	124	266	0	4
    1994	30	DET	AL	109	425	67	110	16	2	28	90	0	0	50	110	.259	.337	.504	114	214	0	2
    1995	31	DET	AL	136	494	70	120	18	1	31	82	0	1	75	116	.243	.346	.472	110	233	0	5
    1996	32	DET	AL	107	391	55	97	12	0	26	80	2	0	63	91	.248	.354	.478	109	187	0	3
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	7	1990	1996	982	3674	558	947	141	4	245	758	519	926	.258	.351	.498	2	3	126
    VT - RIP BB

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    TRAVIS FRYMAN

    Third Baseman, 1990-1997
    #24


    --Class of 2000--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Right
    Born - 3/25/1969


    Biography:

    David Travis Fryman was businesslike in everything he did. He was never flashy, but nonetheless got the job done. And oh, did he get the job done. At first expected to be the heir replacement to Alan Trammell at shortstop, Fryman gradually became entrenched at third base, where he eventually became maybe the greatest third-sacker in team history. Drafted in the first round of the 1987 draft, Fryman was already with parent club by 1990, posting nine home runs and a .297 batting average in just 66 games. And he continued to produce. In 1991, Fryman began a string of seven straight seasons in which he hit at least 15 home runs and drove in at least 80 for the Tigers. When it was all said and done, his two best seasons in Detroit may have been his last two. Fryman hit 22 homers, drove in 100 runs, and batted .268 in 1996, and followed that up with a '97 campaign in which he clubbed 22 long-balls to go along with 102 RBI and a .274 average. A four-time All-Star with the Tigers, he Fryman was also a Silver Slugger winner in 1992. His defensive abilities flourished at third base, and he eventually won a Gold Glove with the Indians in 2000. Following the '97 season, Fryman was traded to the fledgling Diamondbacks organization for Joe Randa, Gabe Alvarez, and a career minor leaguer. Ernie Harwell knew then and there that it wasn’t a good move. "Travis was a great leader and a great talent," the Tigers legend said. "The Tigers never should have let him go. He's one of those true team players." No Tigers fan who remembers Fryman could disagree.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1990	21	DET	AL	66	232	32	69	11	1	9	27	3	3	17	51	.297	.348	.470	127	109	1	1
    1991	22	DET	AL	149	557	65	144	36	3	21	91	12	5	40	149	.259	.309	.447	106	249	6	3
    1992	23	DET	AL	161	659	87	175	31	4	20	96	8	4	45	144	.266	.316	.416	103	274	5	6
    1993	24	DET	AL	151	607	98	182	37	5	22	97	9	4	77	128	.300	.379	.486	133	295	1	4
    1994	25	DET	AL	114	464	66	122	34	5	18	85	2	2	45	128	.263	.326	.474	104	220	1	5
    1995	26	DET	AL	144	567	79	156	21	5	15	81	4	2	63	100	.275	.347	.409	96	232	0	3
    1996	27	DET	AL	157	616	90	165	32	3	22	100	4	3	57	118	.268	.329	.437	93	269	1	4
    1997	28	DET	AL	154	595	90	163	27	3	22	102	16	3	46	113	.274	.326	.440	99	262	0	5
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	8	1990	1997	1096	4297	607	1176	229	29	149	679	390	931	.274	.334	.444	58	26	106
    VT - RIP BB

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    JIM CAMPBELL

    President, 1978-1990
    General Manager, 1962-1983


    --Class of 2000--

    Born - 2/5/1924
    Died - 10/31/1995


    Biography:

    Jim Campbell was married to baseball, literally and figuratively, and his devotion to the game cost him his wife of 15 years. "She accused me of loving baseball more than her. Damned if she wasn’t right," Campbell later said. Making his start in the Tigers organization for the Tomasville, Georgia farm club in 1949, he quickly moved up the ranks, with owner John Fetzer promoting him to Vice President and Director of Minor League Operations in 1960. He held that position until 1963, when he became Fetzer's Vice President and General Manager. Considered family by Fetzer, Campbell was allowed in many cases to run the team the way he saw fit. That worked well, as he shared many of Fetzer's values. Conservative in nature, Campbell held on to baseball's past when it came to negotiating contracts and when it came to his views on arbitration and free agency. Hank Aguirre once refused to sign a contract drawn up by the cigar-smoking executive until it involved a raise in salary. Aguirre got his wish. Campbell increased his salary one cent. Despite his hard-line tactics, Campbell came by his ways honestly. The ex-Ohio State University baseball player was a frugal man himself who believed in few frills. And he was good at what he did. During his tenure, the Tigers won a World Series (in 1968) and fielded contenders throughout the 1960s and early 1970s. In 1972, the nucleus of the '68 team had one last push, winning the American League East title before plummeting to the depths of the standings in 1974. Campbell, who became team president in 1979, soon rebuilt the Tigers into another contender. They won the World Series in 1984 with a core of players built once again through a flourishing farm system. Like its predecessor, that nucleus also went on to win another A.L. East crown. However, just as in 1972, the remnants of the 1987 Tigers fell deep into the second division just two years later. Campbell was eventually promoted to chairman and chief executive to make room for Bo Schembechler on January 8, 1990. However, the Campblell-Schembechler front office didn't last long. Mike Ilitch purchased the team on August 22, 1992, and Campbell's 43-year relationship with the Detroit Tigers was ended with a phone call. Without his first love, Campbell didn't live much longer. He died of a heart attack on Halloween in 1995.


    Executive Record:

    Code:
    Year	Team	W	L	WP	Finish	Champs
    1962	Detroit	85	76	.528	4	
    1963	Detroit	79	83	.488	5	
    1964	Detroit	85	77	.525	4
    1965	Detroit	89	73	.549	4
    1966	Detroit	88	74	.543	3
    1967	Detroit	91	71	.562	2	
    1968	Detroit	103	59	.636	1	WS	
    1969	Detroit	90	72	.556	2	
    1970	Detroit	79	83	.488	4	
    1971	Detroit	91	71	.562	2	
    1972	Detroit	86	70	.551	1	DIV
    1973	Detroit	85	77	.525	3	
    1974	Detroit	72	90	.444	6	
    1975	Detroit	57	102	.358	6
    1976	Detroit	74	87	.460	5
    1977	Detroit	74	88	.457	4
    1978	Detroit	86	76	.531	5
    1979	Detroit	85	76	.528	5
    1980	Detroit	84	78	.519	4
    1981	Detroit	60	49	.550	
    1982	Detroit	83	79	.512	4
    1983	Detroit	92	70	.568	2
    1984	Detroit	104	58	.642	1	WS
    1985	Detroit	84	77	.522	3
    1986	Detroit	87	75	.537	3
    1987	Detroit	98	64	.605	1	DIV
    1988	Detroit	88	74	.543	2
    1989	Detroit	59	103	.364	7
    1990	Detroit	79	83	.488	3
    VT - RIP BB

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    WILLIE HERNANDEZ

    Pitcher, 1984-1989
    #21


    --Class of 2005--

    Bats - Left
    Throws - Left
    Born - 11/14/1954


    Biography:

    Needing one more piece to complete the World Championship puzzle in 1984, the Tigers traded away fan favorites John Wockenfuss and Glenn Wilson to the Philadelphia Phillies for Dave Bergman and a lefty hurler named Guillermo "Willie" Hernandez. It didn't take long for the Tigers to realize that they may have made one of the best trades in team history. Equipped with a deadly screwball and equally deadly confidence, Hernandez's 1984 campaign was one for the ages, especially for a relief pitcher. Willie posted a 9-3 record that season, notching a save in each of his first 32 opportunities. His only blown save in '84 came in his final opportunity of the regular season. It was a regular season in which Herandez pitched just over 140 innings in 80 appearances, posting a sparkling 1.92 ERA in the process. In tandem with Aurelio Lopez, the Tigers were able to feature one of the the best 1-2 bullpen combinations in team history. But as Hernandez proved, the regular season was only the beginning. During the postseason, he was as equally effective. In six games that October, Hernandez logged just over nine innings of work, earning three saves and recording the final out of the 1984 World Series in the process. He finished the season by winning not only the American League Cy Young Award, but also collecting MVP honors, an incredible achievement for any pitcher, much less a reliever. The three-time Tigers All-Star never again had a season that equaled 1984, but he had a few more strong ones. In 1985, he saved 31 games and posted a 2.70 ERA in 107 innings of work. He went on to save 24 games in '86, but started losing favor with the fans, and in turn began to lose confidence. He rejected the name Willie in favor of his given name, Guillermo, and in a fit of frustration once dumped the contents of a water bucket on to a reporter's head. In 1987, manager Sparky Anderson began rotating closers, with Hernandez saving only eight games en route to the Tigers' American League East Division title. He also shared the closer's role with Mike Henneman in the following two seasons, collecting another 25 saves before opting for retirement. When it was all said an done, Hernandez had solidified himself as one of the great relief pitchers in team history. His 120 saves in a Tigers uniform places him third all-time for a Detroit reliever.


    Pitching:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP
    1984	29	DET	AL	9	3	80	0	0	0	68	32	140.3	96	30	30	6	36	112	4	2	548	1.92	204	0.941
    1985	30	DET	AL	8	10	74	0	0	0	64	31	106.7	82	38	32	13	14	76	1	2	415	2.70	151	0.900
    1986	31	DET	AL	8	7	64	0	0	0	53	24	88.7	87	35	35	13	21	77	5	2	376	3.55	117	1.218
    1987	32	DET	AL	3	4	45	0	0	0	31	8	49.0	53	27	20	8	20	30	0	1	217	3.67	116	1.490
    1988	33	DET	AL	6	5	63	0	0	0	38	10	67.7	50	24	23	8	31	59	4	3	284	3.06	125	1.197
    1989	34	DET	AL	2	2	32	0	0	0	25	15	31.3	36	21	20	4	16	30	1	0	141	5.74	66	1.660
    	        
            YR	From	To	W	L	WL%	ERA	G	GS	GF	CG	SHO	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	ERA+
    TOTALS	6	1984	1989	36	31	.537	2.98	358	0	279	0	0	120	483.7	404	175	160	52	138	384	135
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    ERNIE HARWELL

    Broadcaster, 1960-2002


    --Class of 2005--

    Born - 1/25/1918


    Biography:

    While Ty Cobb may be the most famous Detroit Tiger ever, he nonetheless cannot lay claim to the most beloved Georgian in team history. That honor clearly goes to Ernie Harwell. Known as the golden voice of the Tigers, Ernie Harwell is in league with Al Kaline as one of the most influential and enduring names of the second half of the 20th century. He enjoyed stints with the Atlanta Crackers, Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Giants, and Baltimore Orioles before coming to Detroit, where he replaced veteran broadcaster Van Patrick. He immediately became known for his inviting, low-key southern delivery. And his stories of baseball yesteryear soon became as much a part of his broadcasts as the game itself. Although most of them came late in his career, Harwell's classic catch-phrases have become part of the baseball lexicon, not only in Detroit but throughout Major League Baseball. His famed strikeout call, "he stood there like the house by the side of the road," is also his oldest. That phrase came from a poem called "The House by the Side of the Road," that he recited as a ten year-old in the fifth grade. Other legendary Harwell catch-phrases included his home run call ("it’s LONG gone") and his double-play call ("two for the price of one"). Another of Ernie's signature calls was his assigning of hometowns to foul balls caught in the stands. Fans across the state quickly caught on, asking him to plug their hometown on the air, and by the late 1970s it was a Tiger Stadium tradition. Throughout his career Harwell teamed with George Kell, Bob Scheffing, Gene Osborne, Ray Layne, Rick Rizzs, Bob Rathbun, Al Kaline, Jim Price, and Dan Dickerson, but he's best remembered for his partnership with Paul Carey. The legendary broadcasting duo were paired from 1973 until 1991, when Carey retired and Harwell was summarily fired by the Tigers' flagship station, WJR. A hellstorm ensued. Fans threatened to boycott not only the team, but Tigers owner Tom Monaghan's Domino's Pizza franchises. As a result, Harwell's departure from the Tigers was short-lived. He returned to radio for three innings with his apparent replacements –- Rick Rizzs and Bob Rathburn -– for one season, and between 1994 and 1998 did television broadcasts on cable and local TV, before returning to radio in 1999. He remained a radio mainstay until his retirement on September 29, 2002. The only broadcaster to ever be traded for a player, Harwell was the first active announcer to be honored with the Ford C. Frick Award, which cemented his place in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Harwell's portrait is located at the one of the main entrances at Comerica Park, along with a life-size statue honoring his illustrious broadcasting career. In 2004, the Detroit Public Library dedicated a room which will house his personal collection of baseball memorabilia. Harwell was eventually elected to the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 1989, the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame in 1989, and in perhaps his greatest achievement as a broadcaster, the Radio Hall of Fame in 1998. And in 2001, the legacy of legendary Detroit Tigers radio voices came full circle, when Harwell won the Ty Tyson Award for Excellence in Broadcasting.
    VT - RIP BB

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    CHARLIE BENNETT

    Catcher, 1881-1888
    -- Detroit Wolverines --


    --Class of 1890--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Right
    Born - 11/21/1854
    Died - 2/24/1927


    Biography:

    Before Ty Cobb, Joe Lewis, Bobby Layne, Al Kaline, and Gordie Howe, there was Charlie Bennett. He was Detroit's first sports legend. Bennett was considered by many the best catcher in the 1800s, and was one of two captains during the Detroit Wolverines' eight-year tenure. He was the ingenious and popular leader for the franchise that kicked off major league baseball in Detroit. And he was a pioneer. Bennett is often credited for creating the first chest protector for catchers. It was a cork-lined vest made by his wife that he wore under his uniform. A .278 hitter with Detroit, Bennett batted .243 during the Wolverines' glorious 1886 campaign in which they won 87 and lost 36, but defensively lead all National League catchers in total chances (533) and fielding percentage (.955). He also was effective at stopping the opposition's running game. During the Wolverines' World Championship season in 1887, he saw split duties with fellow Charlie (Ganzel), but provided a .400 slugging percentage in the process. His best season with Detroit was probably 1885 when he slugged .456 with 24 doubles, 13 triples, and five home runs in just 91 games. He batted over .300 during each of his first three seasons in Detroit (1881 to 1883). A tragic train accident in 1893 resulted in the loss of both of Bennett's legs, reducing him to the use of artificial limbs. However, the accident didn’t destory Bennett's zest for life or his love affair with Detroit. Bennett Park was opened on Michigan and Trumbull on April 28, 1896, with Charlie throwing the first pitch. It's a routine he continued for every home opener until 1926.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1881	26	DTN	NL	76	299	44	90	18	7	7	64			18	37	.301	.341	.478	149	143		
    1882	27	DTN	NL	84	342	43	103	16	10	5	51			20	33	.301	.340	.450	151	154		
    1883	28	DTN	NL	92	371	56	113	34	7	5	55			26	59	.305	.350	.474	152	176		
    1884	29	DTN	NL	90	341	37	90	18	6	3	40			36	40	.264	.334	.378	130	129		
    1885	30	DTN	NL	91	349	49	94	24	13	5	60			47	37	.269	.356	.456	161	159		
    1886	31	DTN	NL	72	235	37	57	13	5	4	34	4		48	29	.243	.371	.391	129	92		
    1887	32	DTN	NL	46	160	26	39	6	5	3	20	7		30	22	.244	.363	.400	109	64		0
    1888	33	DTN	NL	74	258	32	68	12	4	5	29	4		31	40	.264	.347	.399	137	103		2
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	8	1881	1888	625	2355	324	654	141	57	37	353	256	297	.278	.349	.433	15	0	142
    VT - RIP BB

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    DAN BROUTHERS

    First Baseman, 1886-1888
    "Big Dan"
    -- Detroit Wolverines --


    --Class of 1890--

    Bats - Left
    Throws - Left
    Born - 5/8/1858
    Died - 8/2/1932


    Biography:

    After five years of ineptitude, glory on the diamond was brought to Detroit in the only way they knew how: cold hard cash. For $8,000, the Detroit Wolverines likely purchased themselves the city's first and only N.L. pennant in the fall of 1885. For that tidy sum, Detroit president Fredrick Kimball Stearns purchased the entire Buffalo club, with first baseman Dan Brouthers being the crown jewel of the franchise. Brouthers didn't disappoint. He batted .338 with a .543 slugging percentage during his three-year career in the pre-Motor City, slugging 32 homers and driving in 239 in the process. He led the National League with 40 doubles, 11 home runs, and a .581 slugging percentage in 1886. He followed up that magical season with a .338 batting average, .562 slugging percentage, and an N.L.-leading 153 runs scored and 36 doubles to help lead the Wolverines to the city's first ever World Championship. He was sidelined for much of the 15-game World Series that season due to an ankle injury, but despite that setback the Wolverines beat the American Association's St. Louis Browns 10 games to five. Credited for coining the phrase "keep your eye on the ball," Brouthers once reportedly knocked out a fan with a home run shot. "Big Dan" was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1945.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1886	28	DTN	NL	121	489	139	181	40	15	11	72	21		66	16	.370	.445	.581	206	284		
    1887	29	DTN	NL	123	500	153	169	36	20	12	101	34		71	9	.338	.426	.562	169	281		6
    1888	30	DTN	NL	129	522	118	160	33	11	9	66	34		68	13	.307	.399	.464	174	242		12
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	3	1886	1888	373	1511	410	510	109	46	32	239	205	38	.338	.423	.534	89	0	182
    VT - RIP BB

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    SAM THOMPSON

    Right Fielder, 1885-1888
    "Big Sam"
    -- Detroit Wolverines --


    --Class of 1890--

    Bats - Left
    Throws - Left
    Born - 3/5/1860
    Died - 11/7/1922


    Biography:

    One of baseball's first great sluggers, "Big Sam" Thompson was a 6-foot-2 home run hitting machine. The legendary right fielder was first managed by Indianapolis's young skipper Bill Watkins, and when Watkins was named the Wolverines manager, he brought Thompson along. For parts of four seasons, Thompson proved his worth in the major leagues. During limited action in 1885, Thompson slugged seven home runs and nine triples while batting .303. The strong-armed outfielder followed that up in '86 with his first full season, batting .310 with 18 doubles, 13 triples, and eight homers. He also clouted 89 RBIs along the way. In 1887, Thompson had one of the greatest seasons in National League history. He batted a league-leading .372, to go along with a .571 slugging percentage as well as 166 RBI, 23 triples, and 203 hits. He continued his dominating season in the World Series that October, hitting two home runs while batting .362 with a .621 slugging percentage. "Big Sam's" efforts helped Detroit win the series, ten games to five. Thompson suffered from arm injuries in 1888, in what was to become his last season with the Wolverines, but continued his playing career in Philadelphia before retiring in 1898. His final major league at-bats would come eight years later, when at the age of 46 he appeared in eight games for the Tigers, in the city that had made him a legend. The Veterans Committee elected Thompson to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1885	25	DTN	NL	63	254	58	77	11	9	7	44			16	22	.303	.344	.500	170	127		
    1886	26	DTN	NL	122	503	101	156	18	13	8	89	13		35	31	.310	.355	.445	139	224		
    1887	27	DTN	NL	127	545	118	203	29	23	11	166	22		32	19	.372	.416	.571	168	311		9
    1888	28	DTN	NL	56	238	51	67	10	8	6	40	5		23	10	.282	.352	.466	159	111		3
    1906	46	DET	AL	8	31	4	7	0	1	0	3	0		1		.226	.250	.290	67	9	0	0
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	4	1885	1888	368	1540	328	503	68	53	32	339	106	82	.327	.375	.502	40	0	157
    VT - RIP BB

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    ANDY COOPER

    Pitcher, 1920-1930
    "Lefty"
    -- Detroit Stars --


    --Class of 1930--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Left
    Born - 4/24/1898
    Died - 6/3/1941


    Biography:

    One of the greatest southpaw hurlers in Negro League history, Andy "Lefty" Cooper had it all. A smart pitcher, he was a master at mixing pitches, using a curveball, a change, a slider, and a screwball to frustrate batters with finesse for over 20-years. Cooper was the Stars' only real longtime presence on the mound, pitching in Detroit from 1920 to 1927, before returning to the Motor City in 1930. It took him a few seasons in Detroit to really get going, but once he did he dazzled batters with his pitch-to-contact pinpoint control, rarely issuing a walk and recording few strikeouts. His breakout year came in 1922, when he posted a 14-5 record, following that up with marks of 15-8 in 1923, 12-5 in 1924, 11-3 in 1925, 12-8 in 1926, and 7-3 in 1927. And he wasn't merely a starter. Cooper often came out of the bullpen, and holds the Stars' current known record for career saves (24). On three occasions he posted runs-per-game averages under four -– an incredible feat considering unearned runs were included in that statistic. Leaving for a spot on the Kansas City Monarchs after 1927, Cooper returned for one of the Stars' finest seasons in 1930. During that year he posted a 15-6 mark and completed 16 of the 20 games he started. He walked just nine batters in 161 innings that season and posted a 4.96 RPG mark. Perhaps his best season was his breakout 1922 campaign, in which he completed 16 of the 22 games he started, allowed just 132 hits and 21 walks in 153 innings, and recorded four shutouts en route to a sparkling 3.71 RPG. Holder of Stars records in virtually every key pitching statistic, Cooper finished his time in Detroit boasting a 91-48 record and a 4.24 career RPG. He also made a little history along the way. On June 28, 1930 Cooper was named the Stars' starting pitcher in what became the first baseball game played under lights in the city of Detroit. The visiting Monarchs' travelling night baseball caravan predated lights at Michigan and Trumbull by 18 years. Cooper didn't have one of his better performances that night, taking the loss. But for the most part, his star always shone bright in Detroit.


    Pitching:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	SV	IP	H	BB	SO	RPG	WHIP
    1920	22	DTS	NNL	0	2	8	3	1	0	1	36.7	31	19	10	5.15	1.362
    1921	23	DTS	NNL	5	8	23	16	9	1	0	117.0	122	13	29	4.46	1.154
    1922	24	DTS	NNL	14	5	25	22	16	4	0	153.0	132	21	43	3.71	1.000
    1923	25	DTS	NNL	15	8	36	20	14	1	5	172.7	146	42	55	4.07	1.089
    1924	26	DTS	NNL	12	5	30	13	7	1	6	126.0	122	33	75	4.50	1.230
    1925	27	DTS	NNL	11	3	31	12	6	1	6	126.7	110	24	44	3.41	1.058
    1926	28	DTS	NNL	12	8	36	22	12	1	4	178.0	172	21	48	3.99	1.084
    1927	29	DTS	NNL	7	3	13	11	6	0	1	80.3	87	3	34	4.93	1.121
    1930	32	DTS	NNL	15	6	27	20	16	2	2	161.0	161	9	50	4.97	1.056
    	        
            YR	From	To	W	L	WL%	RPG	G	GS	CG	SHO	SV	IP	H	R	BB	SO
    TOTALS	9	1920	1930	91	48	.655	4.24	229	139	87	11	24	1151.3	1083	542	185	388
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    EDGAR WESLEY

    First Baseman, 1920-1927
    -- Detroit Stars --


    --Class of 1930--

    Bats - Left
    Throws - Left
    Born - 5/2/1891
    Died - Unknown


    Biography:

    The Yankees had Gehrig and Ruth. The Detroit Stars had Edgar Wesley and Turkey Stearnes. And while three of those players are well known, maybe Wesley hasn't gotten the credit he deserves. The left-handed hitting first baseman terrorized opposing pitchers for eight seasons in Detroit, leading the Negro National League in homers three times and winning one batting title. Wesley, who had good speed, had his best season with the Stars in 1925, leading the league with a .424 average and 18 home runs in just 205 at bats. He also had 13 doubles, six triples, and nine stolen bases that season. In addition to his hitting prowess, Wesley was also considered an outstanding defensive first baseman, and was admired for his unassuming manner on and off the field. During his career in the Motor City, Wesley clouted 79 home runs in 330 league games to go along with a .338 career batting average. He also hit 57 doubles, pounded out 13 triples, and stole 27 bases. On five occasions, Wesley batted over .300 with Detroit, and was a member of the pre-NNL Stars team of 1919. Like many Negro Leaguers who came and went mysteriously, little is known of Wesley's life after baseball. What is certain is that he was one of the greatest sluggers to ever call Detroit home.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	H	2B	3B	HR	SB	BA	SLG
    1920	29	DTS	NNL	43	158	45	10	1	10	3	.285	.551
    1921	30	DTS	NNL	33	116	39	7	0	7	3	.336	.578
    1922	31	DTS	NNL	61	218	75	10	5	12	6	.344	.601
    1923	32	DTS	NNL	59	217	74	11	0	17	0	.339	.627
    1925	34	DTS	NNL	56	205	87	13	6	18	9	.424	.810
    1926	35	DTS	NNL	74	257	77	6	1	15	5	.300	.506
    1927	36	DTS	NNL	4	13	3	0	0	0	1	.231	.231
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	H	2B	3B	HR	BA	SLG	SB
    TOTALS	7	1920	1927	330	1185	400	57	13	79	.338	.613	27
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    TURKEY STEARNES

    Center Fielder, 1923-1931
    -- Detroit Stars --


    --Class of 1935--

    Bats - Left
    Throws - Left
    Born - 5/8/1901
    Died - 9/4/1979


    Biography:

    One of the best power hitters in baseball history -- regardless of era or race -- Norman "Turkey" Stearnes' place among the greats also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of the least well known. All who witnessed him were convinced of his greatness, both with his bat, his legs, his defense and his arm. Despite his talents, Stearnes was a quiet man that didn't play for headlines. He just played. When he heard that Turkey Stearnes' name was up for the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown alumnus and former Negro Leaguer Cool Papa Bell said "If they don't put Turkey Stearnes in the Hall of Fame, they shouldn't put anyone in." Bell should know. During 585 league games with Detroit, Stearnes hit 143 homers and led the Negro National League in four-baggers six times, including a run of five home run titles in six seasons (1923, 1924, 1925, 1927, and 1928). He also hit well over .300 routinely, and never once batted under .324 in any of his seasons with the Stars. Even in a season where his batting average bottomed out, Stearnes clouted a NNL-leading 24 home runs in 1928, while socking 18 doubles and seven triples in just 309 at bats. The left-hander purportedly had one of the strangest batting stances and swings in professional baseball. He swung as though his right foot was in a bucket and twisted his right heel with his bit toe pointing up. Clearly there was a method to the madness, as Stearnes finished his Stars career with a .353 average and a .678 slugging percentage. Some might say that if you assembled the three greatest players to ever roam the outfield in Detroit, the question wouldn't be if Stearnes belongs, but who should be out there with him.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	H	2B	3B	HR	SB	BA	SLG
    1923	22	DTS	NNL	57	232	82	15	13	17	1	.353	.750
    1924	23	DTS	NNL	58	231	80	7	11	10	3	.346	.602
    1925	24	DTS	NNL	84	324	118	20	10	18	11	.364	.654
    1926	25	DTS	NNL	82	301	113	24	10	20	13	.375	.721
    1927	26	DTS	NNL	80	292	99	22	12	20	11	.339	.702
    1928	27	DTS	NNL	81	309	100	18	7	24	5	.324	.660
    1929	28	DTS	NNL	69	259	98	15	5	19	12	.378	.695
    1930	29	DTS	NNL	36	127	43	12	10	3	6	.339	.661
    1931	30	DTS	NNL	34	120	45	9	1	8	5	.375	.667
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	H	2B	3B	HR	BA	SLG	SB
    TOTALS	9	1923	1931	585	2217	783	143	79	140	.353	.678	67
    VT - RIP BB

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    HARRY COVELESKI

    Pitcher, 1914-1918
    "The Giant Killer"


    --Class of 2007--
    Veterans Committee

    Bats - Both
    Throws - Left
    Born - 4/23/1886
    Died - 8/4/1950


    Biography:

    Nicknamed "The Giant Killer" because of his three victories over a five-day span against New York during the 1908 pennant chase, Harry Frank Coveleski never had truly consistent success until he came to Detroit in 1914. The southpaw flourished in the Motor City, and his five-year stay with the Tigers included three particularly outstanding seasons, beginning in 1914 when he completed 23 of 36 starts and went 22-12 with a 2.42 ERA. He followed up that campaign with another impressive 22-13 mark, and was a centerpiece a 1915 Tigers team that won 100 games and nearly won the pennant. One of four brothers to play professional baseball, Coveleski's final full season came in 1916 when he won 21 games, recorded a miniscule 1.97 ERA, and tossed a career-high 324 1/3 innings, good for a whopping 940 1/3 IP over the three-season span. Unfortunately, the work load exacted a heavy toll on Coveleski. He developed arm troubles and that limited to only 16 games in 1917. Despite his limited time with Detroit, "The Giant Killer" left an enduring mark on the franchise. To this day, the 2.34 ERA that he recorded as a Tiger remains the best in team history.


    Pitching:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP
    1914	28	DET	AL	22	12	44	36	23	5	6	2	303.3	251	109	84	4	100	124	12	6	1217	2.49	113	1.157
    1915	29	DET	AL	22	13	50	38	20	1	9	4	312.7	271	123	85	2	87	150	20	5	1269	2.45	123	1.145
    1916	30	DET	AL	21	11	44	39	22	3	4	2	324.3	278	105	71	6	63	108	11	5	1248	1.97	145	1.051
    1917	31	DET	AL	4	6	16	11	2	0	1	0	69.0	70	39	20	0	14	15	2	1	280	2.61	101	1.217
    1918	32	DET	AL	0	1	3	1	1	0	2	0	14.0	17	9	6	0	6	3	0	0	62	3.86	69	1.643
    	        
            YR	From	To	W	L	WL%	ERA	G	GS	GF	CG	SHO	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	ERA+
    TOTALS	5	1914	1918	69	43	.616	2.34	157	125	22	68	9	8	1023.3	887	385	266	12	270	400	123
    VT - RIP BB

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    BILLY ROGELL

    Shortstop, 1930-1939
    #7


    --Class of 2007--
    Veterans Committee

    Bats - Both
    Throws - Right
    Born - 11/24/1904
    Died - 8/9/2003


    Biography:

    After bouncing in and out of the major leagues early in his career, William George Rogell's strong 1929 season with St. Paul of the American Association had five big league clubs standing at his doorstep. He chose to sign with the Detroit Tigers, and thus began the start of a prominent career that ultimately saw Rogell making a difference in the city well into his 70s. On the diamond, Rogell was known for his defense and his fiery nature, and by 1932 he had become a fixture at shortstop for the Tigers. His defense was valued so much that Rogell played in every game during the 1933 and pennant-winning 1934 seasons. His constant presence on the field was well justified. Rogell led American League shortstops in fielding three consecutive years, and led in double plays twice. Once each, he also led all position players in the league in putouts, assists, and fielding percentage. Upon occasion his bat was explosive as well, never moreso than during the pennant-winning 1934 season. That year, despite suffering from a broken ankle, he batted .296, drove in 100 runs, and scored 114 of his own. Rogell, along with teammates Hank Greenberg, Charlie Gehringer, and Marv Owen, formed one of the most potent starting infields in baseball history. Their 462 RBIs in 1934 remains a major league record for an infield in a single season. During the following 1935 World Championship season, Rogell's batting average dipped to .275, but he still managed to drive in 71 runs while crossing the plate 88 times himself. He remained a fixture at short for the Tigers until 1939, when he was traded to the Cubs. When he retired from baseball three years later, the Springfield, IL native returned to Detroit where he served on the Detroit City Council until he was 77. While there, he was the chairman for many key committees, including the one that developed much of the highway system and the Detroit Metropolitan Airport. "There was something about Detroit that I always loved," said Rogell, who remained in the metro Detroit area until his death at age 98. The feeling was mutual. Billy Rogell was inducted into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 1970.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1930	25	DET	AL	54	144	20	24	4	2	0	9	1	2	15	23	.167	.250	.222	20	32	5	1
    1931	26	DET	AL	48	185	21	56	12	3	2	24	8	8	24	17	.303	.383	.432	111	80	2	0
    1932	27	DET	AL	144	554	88	150	29	6	9	61	14	6	50	38	.271	.332	.394	84	218	8	1
    1933	28	DET	AL	155	587	67	173	42	11	0	57	6	9	79	33	.295	.381	.404	106	237	6	3
    1934	29	DET	AL	154	592	114	175	32	8	3	100	13	3	74	36	.296	.374	.392	98	232	13	0
    1935	30	DET	AL	150	560	88	154	23	11	6	71	3	6	80	29	.275	.367	.388	98	217	7	1
    1936	31	DET	AL	146	585	85	160	27	5	6	68	14	10	73	41	.274	.357	.368	79	215	6	3
    1937	32	DET	AL	146	536	85	148	30	7	8	64	5	5	83	48	.276	.376	.403	95	216	10	3
    1938	33	DET	AL	136	501	76	130	22	8	3	55	9	2	86	37	.259	.373	.353	78	177	5	5
    1939	34	DET	AL	74	174	24	40	6	3	2	23	3	1	26	14	.230	.330	.333	65	58	6	0
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	10	1930	1939	1207	4418	668	1210	227	64	39	532	590	316	.274	.362	.381	76	52	89
    VT - RIP BB

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    BOBBY HIGGINSON

    Right Fielder/Left Fielder, 1995-2005
    "Higgy"
    #4


    --Class of 2008--

    Bats - Left
    Throws - Right
    Born - 8/18/1970


    Biography:

    When people talk about Detroit Tigers baseball from the-mid 1990s through the mid-2000s, Bobby Higginson is usually the first person brought up. "Higgy" was the face of the organization during these leans years, and was one of the few bright spots on what was often a mediocre or poor Tigers team. The Philadelphia native was originally drafted by Detroit in the 12th round of the 1992 amateur draft, and he signed with the Tigers on June 2. His Tigers career started with a Niagara Falls Rapids squad that finished .500 in the New York-Penn League in 1992, and also shared time with a successful Lakeland team in 1993. As misfortune would have it, it would be his final season as a member of a club with a winning record. By 1995, Higginson had quickly become a fixture with the big league club, featuring good power and patience from the left side of the plate. In his best seasons, a .300 batting average complimented the pop that produced 187 career four-baggers and the good eye that frequently put him among the team leaders in walks. Patrolling left- and right-field with almost equal frequency in his career, teams quickly found out that running on Higginson's arm wasn't a good idea. He threw out 13 runners in his rookie season, one of seven occasions in which he reached double-digits assists, including 20 put-outs in 1997. Considered a "gamer" by his fans, Higginson's best season probably came during his sophomore campaign, when he hit 26 home runs, drove in 81 runs, and batted .320. He followed that season with an equally impressive 27 home runs, 101 RBI, and .299 average in 1997. In impressive fashion, Higginson helped the team open their new home, Comerica Park, in 2000. That year he ripped a career-best 30 home runs and 102 RBI in what would also be the final time his batting average eclipsed .300. By 2003, Higginson's best years were behind him. Unfortunately, he never earned an All-Star invite during his big-league career, an honor that he probably deserved. He was named "Tiger of the Year" in 1997 and 2000, becoming one of only eight players to ever achieve that honor twice.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1995	24	DET	AL	131	410	61	92	17	5	14	43	6	4	62	107	.224	.329	.393	87	161	2	5
    1996	25	DET	AL	130	440	75	141	35	0	26	81	6	3	65	66	.320	.404	.577	146	254	3	1
    1997	26	DET	AL	146	546	94	163	30	5	27	101	12	7	70	85	.299	.379	.520	133	284	0	3
    1998	27	DET	AL	157	612	92	174	37	4	25	85	3	3	63	101	.284	.355	.480	114	294	0	6
    1999	28	DET	AL	107	377	51	90	18	0	12	46	4	6	64	66	.239	.351	.382	87	144	0	2
    2000	29	DET	AL	154	597	104	179	44	4	30	102	15	3	74	99	.300	.377	.538	132	321	2	2
    2001	30	DET	AL	147	541	84	150	28	6	17	71	20	12	80	65	.277	.367	.445	115	241	1	2
    2002	31	DET	AL	119	444	50	125	24	3	10	63	12	5	41	45	.282	.345	.417	108	185	1	6
    2003	32	DET	AL	130	469	61	110	13	4	14	52	8	8	59	73	.235	.320	.369	86	173	1	3
    2004	33	DET	AL	131	448	63	110	24	2	12	64	5	2	70	84	.246	.353	.388	97	174	2	7
    2005	34	DET	AL	10	26	1	2	0	0	0	1	0	0	1	5	.077	.111	.077	-48	2	0	0
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	11	1995	2005	1362	4910	736	1336	270	33	187	709	649	796	.272	.358	.455	91	53	112
    VT - RIP BB

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    MIKE HENNEMAN

    Pitcher, 1987-1995
    #39


    --Class of 2008--

    Bats - Right
    Throws - Right
    Born - 12/11/1961


    Biography:

    In the wake of Willie Hernandez's dominant seasons in the mid-80s, the Detroit Tigers found themselves desperate for some relief help. They eventually found the answer in rookie hurler Mike Henneman, who was soon thrust into the closer's role. Henneman did the job well, posting seven saves in 1987 en route to locking down the back end of the bullpen for the better part of the next eight years. Henneman ended his Tigers career with 154 saves, surpassing John Hiller as the all-time club record holder. He eclipsed 20 saves five times, and came close to doing so again in 1995 before he was dealt to Houston mid-season. Henneman boasted the American League's best win percentage during his debut 1987 season, posting an 11-3 mark. That impressive campaign earned him The Sporting News Rookie Pitcher of the Year award. He made his one and only All-Star Game appearance in 1989, a season in which he recorded 11-4 mark with eight saves. But perhaps his best year in a Tigers uniform had occurred the year before in his sophomore season. It was in that summer that Henneman, who had terrific sinking action on his fastball, racked up 22 saves while posting a microscopic 1.87 earned run average, a career best. As the last effective 1+ inning closer in franchise history, Henneman's career marked the end of an era. Too see a closer take the mound before the ninth inning in today's game is rare. Almost as rare as a pitcher of Henneman's caliber.


    Pitching:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	W	L	G	GS	CG	SHO	GF	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	HBP	WP	BFP	ERA	ERA+	WHIP
    1987	25	DET	AL	11	3	55	0	0	0	28	7	96.7	86	36	32	8	30	75	3	7	399	2.98	143	1.200
    1988	26	DET	AL	9	6	65	0	0	0	51	22	91.3	72	23	19	7	24	58	2	8	364	1.87	204	1.051
    1989	27	DET	AL	11	4	60	0	0	0	35	8	90.0	84	46	37	4	51	69	5	0	401	3.70	103	1.500
    1990	28	DET	AL	8	6	69	0	0	0	53	22	94.3	90	36	32	4	33	50	3	3	399	3.05	130	1.304
    1991	29	DET	AL	10	2	60	0	0	0	50	21	84.3	81	29	27	2	34	61	0	5	358	2.88	144	1.364
    1992	30	DET	AL	2	6	60	0	0	0	53	24	77.3	75	36	34	6	20	58	0	7	321	3.96	100	1.228
    1993	31	DET	AL	5	3	63	0	0	0	50	24	71.7	69	28	21	4	32	58	2	4	316	2.64	163	1.409
    1994	32	DET	AL	1	3	30	0	0	0	23	8	34.7	43	27	20	5	17	27	2	5	167	5.19	94	1.731
    1995	33	DET	AL	0	1	29	0	0	0	26	18	29.3	24	5	5	0	9	24	0	2	118	1.53	314	1.125
    	        
            YR	From	To	W	L	WL%	ERA	G	GS	GF	CG	SHO	SV	IP	H	R	ER	HR	BB	SO	ERA+
    TOTALS	9	1987	1995	57	34	.626	3.05	491	0	369	0	0	154	669.7	624	266	227	40	250	480	134
    VT - RIP BB

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    TONY PHILLIPS

    Left Fielder/Infielder, 1990-1994
    "Tony the Tiger"
    #4


    --Class of 2008--

    Bats - Both
    Throws - Right
    Born - 4/25/1959


    Biography:

    If it's a position on the baseball diamond, chances are Tony "The Tiger" Phillips played it sometime during his career. In a span of just five seasons, Phillips became a fan favorite as one of the irreplaceable cogs in the Tigers' powerful offense of the early- to mid-1990s. And while his 61 home runs with Detroit did help to provide some of that offensive firepower, his most potent weapon was his ability to get on base. One of the best leadoff hitters of the early 90s, Phillips batted .281 and had a .395 on-base percentage during his time at Michigan and Trumbull. His incredible knowledge of the strike zone earned him 519 walks in the Old English D, including a league-leading 132 free passes in 1993. He possessed tremendous baserunning abilities as well, stealing double-digit bases every year in Detroit. Needless to say, Phillips scored his share of runs and then some. He led the American League in runs scored in 1992 with 114, and touched the plate 113 times in an equally impressive 1993 campaign. And despite being a leadoff hitter, Phillips still drove in as many as 72 runs in 1991. Last but not least, he had tremendous defensive value as well. During his MLB career, Phillips played every position except pitcher. This versatility was best showcased in 1991 when the Tigers utilized him in at least nine games at six different positions (seven including designated hitter). It was this rare combination of offensive and defensive skillsets that makes Phillips' chapter in Detroit Tigers history a unique one.


    Hitting:

    Code:
    Year	Ag	Tm	Lg	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	SB	CS	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	OPS+	TB	SH	HBP
    1990	31	DET	AL	152	573	97	144	23	5	8	55	19	9	99	85	.251	.364	.351	101	201	9	4
    1991	32	DET	AL	146	564	87	160	28	4	17	72	10	5	79	95	.284	.371	.438	123	247	3	3
    1992	33	DET	AL	159	606	114	167	32	3	10	64	12	10	114	93	.276	.387	.388	118	235	5	1
    1993	34	DET	AL	151	566	113	177	27	0	7	57	16	11	132	102	.313	.443	.398	130	225	1	4
    1994	35	DET	AL	114	438	91	123	19	3	19	61	13	5	95	105	.281	.409	.468	126	205	0	2
    	        
            YR	From	To	G	AB	R	H	2B	3B	HR	RBI	BB	SO	BA	OBP	SLG	SB	CS	OPS+
    TOTALS	5	1990	1994	722	2747	502	771	129	15	61	309	519	480	.281	.395	.405	70	40	120
    VT - RIP BB

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