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Microline133

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Microline133 last won the day on February 12

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About Microline133

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    MotownSports Fan
  • Birthday 02/23/1980

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    Maynard, Massachusetts

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    Baseball, Scouting, Golf, Reading, Family.

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    Staff Writer/Scout, Baseball Prospectus

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  1. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    To address the first question, it's not that common -- at least in my experience -- that pitchers are told to shelve certain pitches in order to develop others. In more common situations. They are given quotas to throw certain secondary pitches so many times, or the pitch calls from the dugouts force use of certain pitches. To my knowledge, and I have asked explicitly, no such restrictions or directives have been given to Faedo. On Faedo in more detail...I'm sure there was some element of being "amped up" in the CWS, but he was sitting 93-94 and touching 96 as the season progressed and throughout supers. His velo was down early in the year after the fall knee surgery. This year, the velo has regularly been 89-91, and at times crept toward 93....there's a chance that's just him adjusting to pitching every fifth day. I'm not inclined to buy into that thought, as most of the time when that happens, guys tend to find a touch of velocity throughout the year....Faedo hasn't done that. Bottom line, hes not going to survive as more than a #5 absent a tick of velo....if he finds the velo, he might be a #3.
  2. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    This is definitely an understatement.
  3. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    Could be a combination of both, but right now, the tools just don't show up at all. He's lost behind the plate, at the plate, everything is a mess.
  4. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    De La Rosa was intriguing enough, though he's really raw. There's athleticism and the tools to be a solid player, but I think its going to take time. I only saw one game from Brinkman....org type right out of the gate. Nothing really remarkable on the roster. Guzman and Ariera were both interesting as back-end starter types, though Guzman has a little more popup potential than that. Nothing fancy out of the relieveres. O'Loughlin is a reliever all the way and the stuff (mostly the FB) has to step forward at some point for even that to be a realistic possibility. McMillan is a complete mess. Ames and Dugas are prototypical college sluggers with org futures....fringy bat speed, big hacks. Alvarado is impressive physically and flashes tools, but its a long way from coming together.
  5. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    Yes, absolutely. We were admittedly conservative with him based on the feedback we were receiving, and that looks even more justified based on my extended look this week. There's a case to be made that he slots higher than where we have him now, but not much.
  6. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    I sat on Connecticut this entire week....Wenceel is interesting, but he's not a Top 10 guy in this system right now.
  7. This isn't an easy question, because what a team can/will tolerate from an individual player depends largely on what else they have around them. If you assume a contending club that gets the bulk of its production from other positions, then I think you can say .250/.320/.380 with plus defense (I don't really care about the arm or speed for this discussion) may be acceptable (though would draw the ire of some fans, I would imagine). Coincidentally, that's about the leave average line for an NL shortstop this year (.255/.319/.405). The AL average is considerably higher (.266/.327/.433) and likely driven by the presence of guys like Machado, Lindor, Correa, Simmons, etc. For Alcantara, that's a tick better than what the club is getting from Iglesias this year, so maybe I'm slightly overstating what would be acceptable. Looking at Alcantara's minor league performance (and looking at the reasonable scouting projection), he's never slugged that high and as I said yesterday, I don't see any reason to expect he's suddenly going to do that. To make up for it, he'd need to get on base more, as @Gehringer_2 suggested yesterday. He's historically surpassed that .320 OBP mark in the minor leagues, but his OBP is largely batting average driven, and against MLB-level pitchers, I'd expect he's going to be challenged more and will see less pitches out of the zone; meaning you're unlikely to see an uptick in walks at any point, even if his approach/eye continues to improve. All told, Alcantara's a utility infielder for me.
  8. Agreed, it is common for power to develop later in the developmental cycle for many players, but I don't consider that to substantially be the function of physical strength gains at that stage of development. Instead, I find it more common the emergence of power later in the development cycle is a function of the development of other tools; namely the hit tool and overall offensive approach. Players that see power develop at that stage are often seeing the benefit of improved pitch recognition, strike zone knowledge, understanding what pitchers are trying to do against them in a given situation, learning which pitches they can impact and which they can just make contact with, etc. While Alcantara's development is certainly not complete, many of those attributes I mentioned above are nearing complete development. Dramatic development -- at this stage -- of his pitch recognition, strike zone knowledge, etc., is unlikely. When coupled with the fact he lacks present strength or substantive projection to add strength, there's little reason to believe he's going to develop much more than occasional doubles power.
  9. I don't disagree with you on several fronts here. Keep letting him develop in the minor leagues, that's not really a question. I'm just advocating that people probably need to adjust expectations for his upside potential. We're not talking a tall, skinny, 17-year old that you can dream on. We're talking a tin 22-year old that likely doesn't have substantial positive changes remaining his body. Its just expectation management and taking the full spectrum of development under consideration. On your second point, I don't think they're necessarily focusing any more on bat-to-ball skills in player acquisition, just rather this is what's at the upper levels and it gives off the appearance they are. There's plenty of swing-and-miss guys and plenty of contact-oriented guys throughout the system. I haven't noticed any substantive change in organizational philosophy on that front over the last 2-5 years. Lastly, I'm more of the opinion that you can't teach physicality/strength, and while the likelihood you can consistently teach someone how to make contact is small, its greater than teaching the former. From a player acquisition standpoint, for me personally, it depends on the portion of the developmental spectrum I'm looking to acquire from....if I'm going after a teenager that has years of development remaining, give me the guy with superior physicality/strength projection and I'll try to teach him how to get the most out of that physicality. If I'm going and getting a guy in his early-20 at High-A or Double-A (like Alcantara last year), then I may trend more toward a guy with demonstrated in-game skill (possibly bat-to-ball skills) than the dream of physical projection.
  10. How long do we wait for Alcantara to suddenly get stronger? At 22-years old, and with a thin frame, is there really an expectation there will be much in the way of strength gains over the next couple of years; at least in terms of meaningful, game impacting change? We're not talking about a guy with broad shoulders/back that looks like he's got room to hang positive weight/muscle. That's just not his body type. I wouldn't expect it at this point. He's a glove-first guy with contact ability and virtually no power. That's fine, but expecting more than that or projecting substantially more than that at this stage in his development doesn't seem wise to me.
  11. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    As someone involved in the BP list, I'm confident in saying your claim of bias toward certain teams is ridiculous. You don't have that many individuals, spread all over the country, watching different leagues and systems every day, coalesce with organizational bias and you suggest.
  12. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    Nope. The BP list is free: https://www.baseballprospectus.com/prospects/article/41327/2018-prospects-the-midseason-top-50/
  13. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    2018 draftees were intentionally excluded from the updated BP rankings, just as recent J2 guys were.
  14. Microline133

    2018 Draft Pick Watch

    Probably back when Ryan Strieby and Chris Carlson were torching the lowest levels of the minors. 😀
  15. Pena was actually going to retire and was offered a coaching role coming out of spring training. Supposedly, he opted to take some time and see if an opportunity presented either in the Tigers org or with someone else. It did -- sort of -- once injuries struck, but he ultimately did retire and will be coaching down the line, if not already. With Salty, he's simply an experienced catcher they signed because they had a ton of injuries that derailed other plans. Similarly, the conversion of Arvicent Perez to the mound was interrupted because of injuries (its now back in progress).
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