Jump to content

bulldogg

MotownSports Fan
  • Content Count

    18
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

10 Good

About bulldogg

  • Rank
    MotownSports Fan
  1. Yes, that is rubber and sand particles that are filtered throughout the turf for better footing. They have a machine that refines the field turf particles and evenly dispurses it. It's the best turf money can buy other than true sod.
  2. they just built a Million Dollar Plus practice facility. Why would they even consider moving? Did I miss something? What's the reasoning? Thanks
  3. Aren't you the one that called Brian Tiernny on WDFN and made that suggestion?
  4. http://www.mudhens.com/stats/indstats.asp
  5. Yankee Stadiums Left Center and Center fields aren't much different than Copa, and players don't complain about their fences being to deep
  6. Comerica Park 346 402 422 379 330 Averages 331 377 407 378 330
  7. Major League Ballparks MLB Ballpark Left Field Left Center Center Field Right Center Right Field LF Fence CF Fence RF Fence Ballpark at Arlington 334 388 400 381 325 14 8 8 Bank One Ballpark 330 374 407 374 334 7? 7? 7? Busch Stadium 330 372 402 372 330 8 8 8 Camden Yards 337 376 407 391 320 7 7 25 Cinergy Field 325 370 393 373 325 8 40 8 Comerica Park 346 402 422 379 330 8 8 ? Comiskey Park II 330 377 400 372 335 8 8 8 Coors Field 347 390 415 375 350 8 8 17 Dodger Stadium 330 385 395 385 330 8 8 8 Edison Int'l Field 330 365 406 365 330 8 8 18 Enron Field 315 362 435 373 326 21 9 7 Fenway Park 310 379 420 380 302 37.17 8.75 3.42 H.H.H. Metrodome 343 385 408 367 327 7 7 23 Jacobs Field 325 370 405 375 325 19 8 8 Kauffman Stadium 330 375 400 375 330 9 9 9 Miller Park 342 374 400 378 355 8-12 8-12 8-12 Network Associate Coliseum 330 375 400 375 330 8 8 8 Olympic Stadium 325 375 404 375 325 12 12 12 Pacific Bell Park 335 364 404 420 307 8 11 25 PNC Park 325 386 399 375 320 6 10 21 Pro Player Stadium 330 385 434 385 345 8(33) 8 8 Qualcomm Stadium 327 370 405 370 330 8.5 8.5 8.5 Safeco Field 331 390 405 386 326 8 8 8 Shea Stadium 338 378 410 378 338 8 8 8 SkyDome 328 375 400 375 328 10 10 10 Tropicana Field 315 370 404 370 322 8.5 8.5 8.5 Turner Field 335 380 401 390 330 8 8 8 Veterans Stadium 330 371 408 371 330 12 12 12 Wrigley Field 355 368 400 363 353 16 11 15.5 Yankee Stadium 318 399 408 385 314 8 13 10 Averages 331 377 407 378 330 - - -
  8. Our starting pitching is our strong point right now.
  9. Just days after the Tigers traded away pitcher Jeff Weaver, resentment still lingers. Most fans, 90% in a recent Detroit News poll, feel that the Tigers got swindled, blindsided and robbed in the deal. However, given a closer look Dave Dombrowski may have made a trade that could help build the foundation of a team that may well break them out of their decade-long (and counting) slump. In Jeff Weaver, the Tigers gave up a young right-handed starting pitcher just on the brink of stardom. He was the jewel of the Tigers organization and a breath of fresh air from an otherwise lifeless farm system. He gave hope to an organization desperately in need of a savior. A fan favorite, Weaver joined the Tigers in 1999 as a brash, hotheaded 22-year-old just three minor league starts removed from college. In front of fans’ eyes he grew from an immature kid to an outspoken young ace with a fierce desire to win. His 40-51 career record may seem mediocre, however that is a consequence of playing for one of the worst offensive teams in baseball. Now that Weaver is a Yankee look for him to be among the top starters in the American League. Given Weaver’s superior talent and young age (25) one would have to be crazy to trade him, right? Especially after he made a four-year commitment to help turn a losing team around. As talented as Jeff Weaver is and as exceptional as he could become, individuals don’t win championships – teams do. A team consists of a group of twenty-five guys working together for a full season, all for the good of the team. With so much work do be done, where does Mr. Dombrowski start? Many fans think free agency is the answer. Not quite. The truth is there aren’t enough quality free agents to build a team with. History has shown numerous times that one player can’t do it all. Alex Rodriguez is a great example. Sure, he makes a quarter of a billion dollars, but his team is in last place. Money clearly isn’t the quick fix fans make it out to be and in some cases it can be irrelevant altogether. Face the inevitable: Elite free agents don’t want to play for a losing team. Goodbye Jason Giambi, hello Craig Paquette. Others fans think that building from within is the best way to build a team. Drafting, signing and developing your own young talent is a great way to build a contender, unfortunately for the Tigers you need to have young talent to develop. While the Tigers farm system is nowhere near as bad as it was just a decade earlier, it is by no means bursting with talent. While youngsters like Omar Infante, Andres Torres and Kenny Baugh show great promise, the organization lacks depth. As you can see, Mr. Dombrowski’s options are limited. Other than the MLB draft and scouting foreign players the only way to acquire good young talent is via trade. Dave Dombrowski has already rebuilt organizations in Montreal and Florida – who now have two of the best farm systems in baseball as well as success at the Major League level. The best and most effective way to acquire the prospects necessary to rebuild an organization is by trading proven veterans for talented young prospects. Unfortunately for Mr. Dombrowski the Tigers have few players with little or any trade value. The only player with serious trade value was Jeff Weaver, his young ace. He did what he felt he had to do In trading Weaver the Tigers acquired three young players who could make solid contributions for years to come. Carlos Pena, a power hitting first baseman; Franklyn German, a closer who has drawn comparisons to Lee Smith; and Jeremy Bonderman, an eighteen year old starting pitcher whose fastball consistently hits in the mid 90s. While it may not be the most popular move now, it is important to keep an open mind. Remember, Curt Schilling was once a throw-in prospect in a deal for an experience veteran. When it comes to trades, anything can happen – especially when prospects are involved. Let’s take a closer look at the newest players to don the Olde English D. Carlos Pena, a power hitting first baseman that has drawn comparisons to Jason Giambi, was the principle player the Tigers received in the deal. Ranked as sixth best prospect in the nation by Baseball Prospectus, Carlos has spent the majority of his minor league career in the Texas Rangers’ farm system. Traded to Oakland this off-season for a package of 4 prospects, he began the year as the A’s starting first baseman. After getting off to a hot start, he quickly cooled off and was sent to the minors by A’s GM Billy Beane in a roster shake-up to help break his team out of an early season slump. He has shown power to all fields and has exceptional strike zone judgment. He is well above average defensively and could be a Gold Glove candidate eventually. He has a great mind for the game and scouts praise his work ethic, clutch ability and openness to suggestion. He could be a fixture in Motown for years to come. Franklyn German, the pitcher acquired in the deal has been rated as the top closer prospect in baseball by several sources. He throws, as well as looks like Lee Smith or Armando Benitez. While playing for AA Midland in the A’s farm system he had a record of 1-1 with 16 saves and struck out an amazing 59 batters in 41 1/3 innings. In the hitter friendly Texas League the 6-6, 260-pound right-hander held opposing batters to a miniscule .194 average. At only 22 years old, he will join the Tigers AAA Toledo affiliate and share the closers role there with fellow flamethrower Fernando Rodney. The unofficial third player in the deal, Jeremy Bonderman, was Oakland’s 2001 first round draft pick at 26th overall. He can’t officially be announced as the player to be named later until August 22nd - one year after he signed his first pro contract. At age 17 his fastball was clocked at 97 MPH. Now 19 years old and pitching in the class A California League he has racked up 105 K in just 93 1/3 IP. While his 4.15 ERA isn’t spectacular, when you consider he was in high school 13 months ago and now he’s on the verge of AA, you can see he could be something special. It may not make sense now, but give it time. The results might just surprise you.
  10. I like Alan Trammel as much as anyone, he has always been one of my favorite Tigers. But he wasn't respected before as a coach. He wouldn't make a good manager I don't believe.
  11. Top Prospect Alert - David Espinosa David Espinosa: Even though Espinosa has yet to play a regular season game in the Reds system, this first round pick from last year's draft is my choice as the best infield prospect in this system now with Drew Henson recently being traded. As an 18-year-old, Espinosa was probabaly the second best high school middle infield prospect in the state of Florida, only ranking behind Luis Montanez. In his last season playing at Gulliver Prep, he batted .476 with 9 home runs, 35 runs batted in, and 38 steals in 103 at-bats as a lead-off hitter. Even with all of his talents, Espinosa was stll available for Cincinnati as the 23rd overall selection, probably because of him being a Scott Boras client. He signed too late to play in the minors during 2000, but eventually agreed to a creative deal that guarantees he will make at least $2.75 million with the max being as much as $5 million with incentives. At 6-foot-2 and 175 pounds, this switch-hitting second baseman as been compared to a bigger, better hitting Rey Ordonez with some power. The hitting assessment is correct but the defensive view may be a stretch as there aren't many you can make the spectatular plays look as routine as Ordonez does. Espinosa is a very good defensive player, but that label is probably unfair. He as the speed to bat leadoff and projects as the Reds future leadoff hitter. His power is above average for that spot plus he is a very good contact hitter. Look for this now 19-year-old to spend 2001 at SIngle-A Dayton. If everything goes to plan he should be ready to play in the majors in about three years. The Reds do already have a very good midle infield with Larkin and Reese, pls they have Travis "Gookie" Dawkins almost ready to compete for playing time so there is no need to rush Espinosa. I think Espinosa will pass Dawkins as the system's best middle infield prospect
  12. Top Prospect Alert - David Espinosa David Espinosa: Even though Espinosa has yet to play a regular season game in the Reds system, this first round pick from last year's draft is my choice as the best infield prospect in this system now with Drew Henson recently being traded. As an 18-year-old, Espinosa was probabaly the second best high school middle infield prospect in the state of Florida, only ranking behind Luis Montanez. In his last season playing at Gulliver Prep, he batted .476 with 9 home runs, 35 runs batted in, and 38 steals in 103 at-bats as a lead-off hitter. Even with all of his talents, Espinosa was stll available for Cincinnati as the 23rd overall selection, probably because of him being a Scott Boras client. He signed too late to play in the minors during 2000, but eventually agreed to a creative deal that guarantees he will make at least $2.75 million with the max being as much as $5 million with incentives. At 6-foot-2 and 175 pounds, this switch-hitting second baseman as been compared to a bigger, better hitting Rey Ordonez with some power. The hitting assessment is correct but the defensive view may be a stretch as there aren't many you can make the spectatular plays look as routine as Ordonez does. Espinosa is a very good defensive player, but that label is probably unfair. He as the speed to bat leadoff and projects as the Reds future leadoff hitter. His power is above average for that spot plus he is a very good contact hitter. Look for this now 19-year-old to spend 2001 at SIngle-A Dayton. If everything goes to plan he should be ready to play in the majors in about three years. The Reds do already have a very good midle infield with Larkin and Reese, pls they have Travis "Gookie" Dawkins almost ready to compete for playing time so there is no need to rush Espinosa. I think Espinosa will pass Dawkins as the system's best middle infield prospect
  13. Could Dave Dombrowski be cutting payroll to have enough money to afford some of the players that are going to be contracted ?
  14. This is an article from The Grand Rapids Press's Sports Editor Bob Becker. You can find this article on M-Lives Detroit Tiger Home page, under the Grand Rapids link. Dombrowski is right: Tigers are slugs Thursday, July 25, 2002 By Bob Becker The Grand Rapids Press Dave Dombrowski is right. The Detroit Tigers don't have many players other teams would want, and it would be a godsend if somebody would take Dean Palmer's $8 million salary and oft-injured body off his hands. For three days we've heard the weeping and gnashing of teeth, as people pondered the wisdom of the Tigers' team president actually telling the truth to his paying customers. When I first read his remarks, I thought "Go Dave!" And frankly, I don't understand the buzz. Why should you take grief for telling the truth? During the luncheon Dombrowski basically said it would be nice if another team would come in and take Palmer and Craig Paquette off his hands. He didn't say they were bad people, he didn't say he hated them. But he indicated that the $10.5 million the club was paying them was a drain, since it amounts to virtually 20 percent of the entire team payroll, and the team has gotten virtually nothing in return. What is wrong with that? Politically it probably was bolder than necessary. But in reality Dombrowski was right, and he had no reason to apologize to anybody for anything. If apologies are in order, they should be coming from the players, who are splitting a $55 million pot while performing like 55 cent players. Let's look at this for a minute. Palmer has been hurt, and that is unfortunate for both the player and the club. But despite very limited opportunities to play, he's gotten every penny of the salary his contract calls for. However, had he been healthy, hit .325, with 50 home runs and 120 RBI's, he'd have been rapping on Dombrowski's door asking for more. That's baseball. Reward me when I do well, but don't punish me when I fail to perform. The Tigers would be better offwithout him, but they are stuck because he is injury prone and getting paid millions more than he's worth. If he got his feelings hurt by what Dombrowski said, he's got eight million reasons to get over it. You haven't heard him offer to give any of it back, have you, to help his team get better? The Tigers are cleaning house. People were upset when Dombrowski unloaded Jeff Weaver to the Yankees. But why? What did the team win with Weaver under contract? For that matter, what has the team won with Bobby Higginson under contract? Or any of these guys? So why not dump the money, bring in some prospects and start over? Tigers fans hate to hear that -- they've been starting over for more than a decade -- but the team as its assembled now isn't going to win anything. I would rather have Dombrowski step up to the microphone and tell the truth then to have him spout some feel-good mumbo-jumbo that we all know means nothing. And if a player's feelings are bruised, too bad. It hasn't bothered them a bit that they've been bruising the feelings of the fans for years. The Tigers are in a sad state and there's nothing wrong with club officials saying so. If the players don't like it, let them start doing something about it. Dombrowski is making wholesale changes, built around prospects. This is a risky business, because a Triple-A all-star can very easily fizzle at the big-league level. But you have to start somewhere, and if you can get 12 young players for four veterans, then the odds tell you that you have a chance of getting four better ones once you've culled through that original 12 -- at a lot less money. So get off Dombrowski's back. He doesn't have many options. There is no benefit to an even-up trade, and he's not going to get a better play for a guy like Higginson. So all he can do is trade one veteran for two or three prospects, and then keep his fingers crossed. If that makes you uncomfortable, give me an alternative. Dave Dombrowski is a good baseball man, and he's trying to make something happen even though his hands are tied by a lack of talent in the clubhouse. I don't give a hoot about the players' feelings. Dombrowski was right. The roster doesn't give him much to work with, and any general manager would have to be nuts to take his high-priced, low-performing slugs off his hands. Apologize? For what?
×
×
  • Create New...